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Old 09-22-2013, 12:09 PM   #201
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id say a hobie kayak with the pedal system. I fished all the time near Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center in Florida. had a blast catching red fish and trout all day
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Old 09-22-2013, 12:14 PM   #202
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Native Ultimate FTW..... Best seat out there
http://www.nativewatercraft.com/m.boat.cfm?id=9
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Old 09-24-2013, 07:03 AM   #203
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I just ate it back in June and bought a 2013 Jackson Coosa. It was right at $1100, but by far the MIL-SPEC of kayak, other than the Hobies. Jackson makes a very solid boat, and by far the best and most comfortable seat i've ever fished out of. Im probably gonna register it and put a 30lb trolling motor on the back eventually. I will try and post up a video when I do.
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Old 10-28-2013, 10:54 AM   #204
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Smile Fishing Kayak

I have a Jackson Kilroy, it is 11ft long and weighs about 75lbs. Great fishing in a kayak. There are several types and prices of fishing rigs; but the run from $800 to over $2K.
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Old 10-28-2013, 07:49 PM   #205
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Love my Wilde Ride 115!
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Old 11-30-2013, 06:18 PM   #206
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wilderness systems tarpon 14ft FTW
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:36 AM   #207
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Of everyone that has a yak, what do you guys prefer sit in or sit on? Explain your reasoning please. I follow a couple yakers on Instagram and they mostly all have sit on, and seeing there pictures it makes me want to get into it more. Just curious what you all have to say about either. I personally like the sit ons, but I have never fished out of a kayak, let alone ride one anyways.
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:46 AM   #208
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You see my yak above. I'm standing in it and I love that. You can't stand in all of them and not everyone wants too anyway. Go to YouTube and look at all the videos. Tons of info GL. You really can't go wrong with any sot kayaks.
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Old 12-25-2013, 08:05 AM   #209
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Fishing kayaks are grat fun.
We picked up 2 Jackson Cuda 12s in Oct and brought them to Baja with us.
Great kayaks, pretty stable, easy to paddle, lots of rod and gear attachments, and a super comfy seat. Easy to get in and out for spearfishing.
That's a Tracrak rack on my Taco.
Have not tried too much fishing yet as the wind has been too strong, but great for paddling the bays. Balandra Beach in the pic.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:18 AM   #211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pope953 View Post
I had been looking at ones similar to this one:

http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/pr...417832.4417969
My claims about kayak types are generalizations. There are thousands of models and accessories which could contradict my opinions. Note that I have a sit on top variety (Jackson Big Tuna).

To answer your first question regarding sit-in vs. sit-on: the sit on top varieties offer more storage space and easier access to that storage. While on the water, I can spin around and access the tackle behind my seat OR I can scoot forward to access bow area storage. When I go fishing, I never want to look across the lake at my truck and think "man, wish I had brought that _____. So, I take roughly 70lbs of tackle and "stuff" with me. Nothing is worse than paddling across the lake just to fetch something you should have had in the first place.

Sit inside kayaks are generally narrower and faster. They typically require less effort to paddle. Sit inside kayaks are just more efficient. That's why touring kayaks are usually sit-ins. The sit on top kayaks are wider. Does this mean they are more stable? The sit inside versions have a lower COG (your rear end is under the water line in a sit inside kayak). Whereas I am 8" above the water line with my kayak's seat in the highest position. So the increased width of my sit on top kayak is nearly offset by the higher COG.

Entering and exiting a sit on top kayak is much easier (at least it is for me). I can hop out in the middle of a lake and climb back in with ease. Skilled (read: SKINNY) folks can probably do this on a sit-in type of kayak but not me.

Sit inside kayaks generally weigh much less than sit on top types. My Big Tuna kayak weighs a ton. If you're going to be hiking your boat into some remote put-in areas; weight should be a consideration. There's a river area I like to fish that I can't get to unless I'm with a friend who can help tote my kayak to the bank. Even if I had a dolly on the front end, it's impossible or at least really difficult to access.

I don't want to completely dissuade you from getting that kayak in the hyperlink but is a 250lb capacity enough for your needs? Seriously, gather up all of the rods/reels/tackle you'd be taking and weigh it. Get a milk crate for other goodies, some bungees, a few waters or a camelback, add a couple pound for a life jacket and a paddle. Then think about future gear options like an anchor or a drag chain. Add the weight of all of these items to your own weight and see how close you'll come to the 250# mark. My kayak is overkill for solo paddles but I regularly take a 220 pound buddy in my kayak with me (yes, it looks as funny as it sounds). But, I'd hate to dump $400 on something that MIGHT meet my needs. Now, if you're only doing this as a "proof of concept" trial to see if you like it, then go for it. If you are pretty sure this is a hobby you'll want to pursue, I'd consider a boat with a larger weight capacity. Academy has some awesome deals on kayaks. Specifically, look at their Perception Sport Pescador 12' version. It has a 350 lb. capacity with a dry storage compartment in the bow. While it's $100 more than the item you referenced; it offers quite a bit more including a padded seat with adjustable backrest.

Find a local kayak shop and rent one for the day or even the weekend. Spend a full day on the water with it and assess what you like or don't like about it.
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Old 12-27-2013, 03:05 PM   #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pope953 View Post
I had been looking at ones similar to this one:

http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/pr...417832.4417969
Good info from OkieLad there. Only thing I would add would be to check out some of your smaller dealers this time of year. There are newer models coming in and you may save a buck or three on a yak you might have thought out of your price range before. I looked long and hard and found a deal on labor day where I got the boat, a vest, paddle and a few other options for the normal price of the boat alone. PM me if you want info on where I got mine.


I have a Wilderness Systems Ride 115..which I LOVE. I do primarily bass fishing, which means standing up, sitting down...lots of movement. I think that would be difficult in a sit-in. Plus, the 350lb capacity means I can carry a bunch of stuff if I ever get the change to float a river and do some camping. Those were the two biggest determining factors with my choice of sit-on vs. sit-in. Bottom line, it's all personal preference. SOT works best for what I wanted the boat for, so that's the route I went.

In any case, I hope you find a good boat and get out there and enjoy it. I wish I'd have done this years ago!
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Old 12-27-2013, 05:39 PM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OkieLad View Post
My claims about kayak types are generalizations. There are thousands of models and accessories which could contradict my opinions. Note that I have a sit on top variety (Jackson Big Tuna).

To answer your first question regarding sit-in vs. sit-on: the sit on top varieties offer more storage space and easier access to that storage. While on the water, I can spin around and access the tackle behind my seat OR I can scoot forward to access bow area storage. When I go fishing, I never want to look across the lake at my truck and think "man, wish I had brought that _____. So, I take roughly 70lbs of tackle and "stuff" with me. Nothing is worse than paddling across the lake just to fetch something you should have had in the first place.

Sit inside kayaks are generally narrower and faster. They typically require less effort to paddle. Sit inside kayaks are just more efficient. That's why touring kayaks are usually sit-ins. The sit on top kayaks are wider. Does this mean they are more stable? The sit inside versions have a lower COG (your rear end is under the water line in a sit inside kayak). Whereas I am 8" above the water line with my kayak's seat in the highest position. So the increased width of my sit on top kayak is nearly offset by the higher COG.

Entering and exiting a sit on top kayak is much easier (at least it is for me). I can hop out in the middle of a lake and climb back in with ease. Skilled (read: SKINNY) folks can probably do this on a sit-in type of kayak but not me.

Sit inside kayaks generally weigh much less than sit on top types. My Big Tuna kayak weighs a ton. If you're going to be hiking your boat into some remote put-in areas; weight should be a consideration. There's a river area I like to fish that I can't get to unless I'm with a friend who can help tote my kayak to the bank. Even if I had a dolly on the front end, it's impossible or at least really difficult to access.

I don't want to completely dissuade you from getting that kayak in the hyperlink but is a 250lb capacity enough for your needs? Seriously, gather up all of the rods/reels/tackle you'd be taking and weigh it. Get a milk crate for other goodies, some bungees, a few waters or a camelback, add a couple pound for a life jacket and a paddle. Then think about future gear options like an anchor or a drag chain. Add the weight of all of these items to your own weight and see how close you'll come to the 250# mark. My kayak is overkill for solo paddles but I regularly take a 220 pound buddy in my kayak with me (yes, it looks as funny as it sounds). But, I'd hate to dump $400 on something that MIGHT meet my needs. Now, if you're only doing this as a "proof of concept" trial to see if you like it, then go for it. If you are pretty sure this is a hobby you'll want to pursue, I'd consider a boat with a larger weight capacity. Academy has some awesome deals on kayaks. Specifically, look at their Perception Sport Pescador 12' version. It has a 350 lb. capacity with a dry storage compartment in the bow. While it's $100 more than the item you referenced; it offers quite a bit more including a padded seat with adjustable backrest.

Find a local kayak shop and rent one for the day or even the weekend. Spend a full day on the water with it and assess what you like or don't like about it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by budd4766 View Post
Good info from OkieLad there. Only thing I would add would be to check out some of your smaller dealers this time of year. There are newer models coming in and you may save a buck or three on a yak you might have thought out of your price range before. I looked long and hard and found a deal on labor day where I got the boat, a vest, paddle and a few other options for the normal price of the boat alone. PM me if you want info on where I got mine.


I have a Wilderness Systems Ride 115..which I LOVE. I do primarily bass fishing, which means standing up, sitting down...lots of movement. I think that would be difficult in a sit-in. Plus, the 350lb capacity means I can carry a bunch of stuff if I ever get the change to float a river and do some camping. Those were the two biggest determining factors with my choice of sit-on vs. sit-in. Bottom line, it's all personal preference. SOT works best for what I wanted the boat for, so that's the route I went.

In any case, I hope you find a good boat and get out there and enjoy it. I wish I'd have done this years ago!
Thanks for all the amazing info guys. I currently weigh around 150lbs. And I didn't think about adding all the gear adding weight, and now that I think about it, I'd most likely stuff as many poles as I could, which would only be as many rod holes the yak has. I guarantee that I would have close to, if not right at 100lbs. I have a lot of gear, I'd be doing bass fishing, and probably bass fishing only, and that would be fishing only just lakes, so lots of calm water and mostly easy access areas to put the yak in. My thing is I want something that I can do like ya'll are saying, be able to carry all the gear that I possibly need but still be able to man handle the yak by myself.

I will really take all the info you all have given and really do some more homework as I had not thought it all the way through. Like I said, I just got the idea and thought it would be a fun thing to try. I have a couple small lakes close to me that are trolling motor only so that would be great to have a kayak, I could launch where I want on the lake rather than always at the boat ramp and then motor to where I want to go. If I had the kayak I could throw it in at the part of the lake I wanted to be at. I guess the question I have to ask myself is it really justifiable considering I have a 15' bass boat.
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Old 12-28-2013, 07:19 AM   #214
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I use a wilderness pungo 120 for fishing. I really like it. It's lightweight, has a good weight capacity, and a huge cockpit (sit in yak) so moving around for me is no big deal(i'm also ~150lbs). I can stand up in it, move around relatively freely, etc... It holds a pretty good amount of gear too. I use it for camping pretty regularly. I've got some crates I rigged up to go on the deck behind me. On other thing to consider is a lot of the SOT's have the scupper holes (which can be plugged). If you live/ use it primarily in warm weather the scupper holes are fine. I like my SIK since I use it almost year round, with the exception of when my lake is iced over. It keeps me a little warmer and the water off of me a little better than a SOT. That said, I also have a dry suit for when it's really cold so not much difference between a SOT or SIK at that point.

It has great stability, and tracks really well. I live on a lake, so the majority of fishing is bass fishing. However, about every other week (depending on schedule and tides) I use it for striper fishing off Cape Cod. It handles both flatwater and saltwater very well. Obviously there are trade offs (full range of movement, seating position, etc..) but for an all around kayak you can't go wrong with a pungo 120 or similar. It isn't the best at anything, but is good at just about everything besides getting out through heavy surf.

I also appreciate when striper fishing if we stay out too long and have to drag the boats across a few hundred yards of salt flats (depending on where we park) that it's relatively light. My striper fishing partner uses a wilderness tarpon 16ft and it's pretty exhausting hauling one across the flats. All in all you can't really go wrong. I got my kayak used off craigslist and couldn't be happier with it.

Don't only look at the "fishing" kayaks either. They are just regular ones with some extra gear bolted to the hull. You can usually make a "fishing" kayak from a regular one pretty easily and cheaper than buying the "fishing" one. Best advice is to go sit in a couple, try to pivot around, grab stuff from different points in the boat and see which one fits you and your intended use the best.

Off Cape Cod:








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Old 12-28-2013, 10:25 AM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth View Post
Don't only look at the "fishing" kayaks either. They are just regular ones with some extra gear bolted to the hull. You can usually make a "fishing" kayak from a regular one pretty easily and cheaper than buying the "fishing" one.
^THIS^ is spot on.
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Old 12-29-2013, 07:45 AM   #216
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Just bought my first yak last night from Bass Pro here in Palm Bay, FL. Too bad I cant get out there and fish today. Thunderstorms are headed in soon. I bought the FS10, and I spent a couple hours last night creating a list of things to do to it and mods for it. Now I have to hit up walmart to get some supplies. Hopefully I can get most of the stuff I need today and get out on the water first thing in the morning. Anyone in the melbourne, florida area wanna go fishing in the river hit me up. Would love to launch her for the first time with a fellow TacomaWorld member.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:08 PM   #217
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I recently bought my tacoma because I was sick and tired of transporting my kayak on top of a roof rack. I even went and got a long bed. It is such a breeze sliding the kayak in and out of the truck bed. I also use bed extender made by t-bone. I use a native watercraft manta ray 14 with a rudder. I choose the sit on top design because it has scupper holes to bail out the water. I fish mostly the florida gulf coast and paddle around 10-15 miles to find fish (redfish, seatrout, snook, black drum).

here is a picture of my friend's set up
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:33 PM   #218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth View Post
I use a wilderness pungo 120 for fishing. I really like it. It's lightweight, has a good weight capacity, and a huge cockpit (sit in yak) so moving around for me is no big deal. I can stand up in it, move around relatively freely, etc... It holds a pretty good amount of gear too. I use it for camping pretty regularly. It keeps me a little warmer and the water off of me a little better than a SOT. That said, I also have a dry suit for when it's really cold so not much difference between a SOT or SIK at that point.

It has great stability, and tracks really well. I live on a lake, so the majority of fishing is bass fishing. However, about every other week (depending on schedule and tides) I use it for striper fishing off Cape Cod. It handles both flatwater and saltwater very well. Obviously there are trade offs (full range of movement, seating position, etc..) but for an all around kayak you can't go wrong with a pungo 120 or similar. It isn't the best at anything, but is good at just about everything besides getting out through heavy surf.

Don't only look at the "fishing" kayaks either. They are just regular ones with some extra gear bolted to the hull. You can usually make a "fishing" kayak from a regular one pretty easily and cheaper than buying the "fishing" one. Best advice is to go sit in a couple, try to pivot around, grab stuff from different points in the boat and see which one fits you and your intended use the best.
We'll said. I love my Pungo 120 and have done multiple camping trips with it. Fishing is very easy in this wider boat with the SOT stability in a sit-in kayak. Fantastic all around useful kayak to have. The only down side for me was wanting to go with the 14ft Pungo for more storage on longer camping expeditions.

Also agree that just buy a regular kayak and make it a fishing kayak, much cheaper and you can customize it to your personal needs.

Local demo days are very common and are a lot of fun. You can see what you like, love, hate, must have, etc... without spending any money.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:49 PM   #220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tacodane View Post
id say a hobie kayak with the pedal system. I fished all the time near Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center in Florida. had a blast catching red fish and trout all day

The Hobie with the pedaldrive is awesome, your hands are free to handle the fishing gear and you can still propel yourself along using some of your strongest muscles.
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