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Old 01-10-2010, 08:31 PM   #21
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I would look towards a Hobart 187

Flux core is basic. It's simple, but its kinda hard to weld with it. It'll take you a few spools to get used to. Hard thing about flux is you can't see the puddle when you are welding. But once you get used to it you're golden.

If I was in your boat and didn't want to go with a 220 volt I'd get a Hobart 125 or 140. Both of those welders are good machine. I would look away from the Harbor Freight stuff. They are total garbage.

Both of those 2 welders allow you to go to a gas set up in the future.

Edit.
Hobart 140
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...6073_200306073

Hobart 125
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7024_200127024
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Old 01-11-2010, 06:05 AM   #22
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to be honest i would go stick. i have been researcing welders for a couple weeks now and thats what i am goig with. mig has way to many settings for my liking, and mig you really have to use gas for it to be worth it. arc or stick welding is cheap and from what i have seen make better (stronger) welders they just dont look as good.

i am in the same spot as you man, i have looked and am going to choose between one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=66787

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91110

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=98870

the last one i have almost already ruled out. that middle or the smaller one is a F*CKING BEAST look on youtube that thing is pretty cool for its little size and little price. type in harbor frieght 80 amp welder there is som artist that uses it and he had it welding some thick stuff. the fact that its inverted is key.

you have a washer and dryer right? good chance one of those is 230/240 volt plugg into that. thats what i am going to do. at this point i am liking this: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=66787

i dont know why people hate on the HF tools there great in my world. never had one break on me.

i am still new to this so dont judge me, also to the smart guys out there with the black smaller 240v welder, do you think i could weld smaller things like bicycle frames with it? or would it only work for the bigger stuff?

and too the orginal poster this is a good welder: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91110

i think you could use it to welder your bumpers, as far as like trying to mount a winch to those bumpers at that point i would say i wouldnt trust that little thing. but as long as you dont make a crazy thick, or heavy duty bumper i bet you ??COULD?? get by using that. and remeber for a mig that can weld as strong as that little thing your going to pay atleast 2 times as much for.
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Old 01-11-2010, 06:49 AM   #23
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I have had the Lincoln Weld Pak with the Flux Core wire for years and love it. Very good for light welds. I have even done a few iight frame reinforcement welds on my 71 TR-6 and it did fine.
True it is not like a 220 welder but for something that plugs right in to a 110 outlet it is fine.
Just my 2 cents
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Old 01-11-2010, 06:59 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyboy View Post
Ladies and Gents,

I want to get into welding soon, mainly to build a bumper because of a recent front end collision, and sliders, and whatever.

I have read and researched a TON on the differences and types of welders out there; from MIG, TIG, "stick", and whatever in between.

As stated, my main goal is to weld tube bumpers, sliders, and smaller projects; nothing huge like structural work.

1. I want something "simple" and DO NOT want to deal with gases and whatever.

2. Another MAJOR concern of mines is the power outlet consumption of the welder; I know I don't have any 240V outlets in the garage and do not want to get into making one (<<< probably kill myself).

3. Poor college student, so looking for a low cost but good one.

My choices are pretty much down to "stick" and MIG/flux core, mainly due to the simplicity of them. I understand the pros and cons of each and found some.

I just want opinions on these if they are good enough for tube bumpers, sliders, similar work.

Some that I'm interested in:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Lincoln-Weld-Pak...item45ef931234

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91110

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94056

OK, Iím going to put my 2 cents in here and you decide! !! It has been my experience through the years that a good craftsman can accomplish a good job with a minimum of tools. On the other hand the less experience one has the better tools he/she needs to produce an acceptable job! ! !
I would suggest that you purchase a machine that is better than you need and weld at mid range of its capability and before you weld on your bumper and sliders, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! ! !!! You will never be sorry.
One last thing, with a machine that has an 18% duty cycle means you can weld 18 minutes each hour.
Thatís my story and Iím sticking to it! ! ! ! !
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:04 AM   #25
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I agree with Don, but the duty cycle is calculated as a % of a 10 minute period. 18% of 10 minutes means that you can weld for 1.8 minutes, then the welder must cool for 8.2 minutes. That calculates to 10.8 minutes of welding per hour.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:36 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhatThePho? View Post
If I was in your boat and didn't want to go with a 220 volt I'd get a Hobart 125 or 140. Both of those welders are good machine. I would look away from the Harbor Freight stuff. They are total garbage.

Both of those 2 welders allow you to go to a gas set up in the future.

Edit.
Hobart 140
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...6073_200306073

Hobart 125
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7024_200127024
x2 for the Hobart Handler 140. I have one and it's a great little MIG welder for something running on a standard outlet. Fantastic quality, and the 140 comes with everything needed to hook up gas when you're ready to get a tank.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:37 AM   #27
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just dont let some weld pop off and go into your belly button,it hurts so bad and you will have to rip it out,oouucchh.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:39 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by jbob View Post
just dont let some weld pop off and go into your belly button,it hurts so bad and you will have to rip it out,oouucchh.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:47 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdmcq View Post
I agree with Don, but the duty cycle is calculated as a % of a 10 minute period. 18% of 10 minutes means that you can weld for 1.8 minutes, then the welder must cool for 8.2 minutes. That calculates to 10.8 minutes of welding per hour.
Thanks for the correction but it is still a lot of down time when you are chomping at the bit wanting to weld, weld, weld! !! ! ! !
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:47 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Don G View Post
Thanks for the correction but it is still a lot of down time when you are chomping at the bit wanting to weld, weld, weld! !! ! ! !
I agree!
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Old 01-11-2010, 08:12 AM   #31
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Definitely get a machine with 50% duty cycle or better... 100% would be optimum, especially for those looongg beads!
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:18 AM   #32
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Lincoln
Hobart
Miller
You can't go wrong. Cheaper welders will more than likely become a source of frustration over time.
I am partial to gas shielded MIG welding. Easy to learn and looks good out of the gun.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:24 AM   #33
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Defiantly start with MIG. Start with smaller projects learning what happens when you adjust the power and wire speed, and how they affect the weld. Depending on how thick of a bumper you're planning on making 110V may not be enough. The shielding Gas really isn't too much of a hassle.


ohh and X2 on the at least 50% duty cycle........ waiting blows.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:27 AM   #34
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I've heard that the Lincoln welders sold at the big box stores have different internals than those sold at welder supply places. Part #s are the same but internals are of a lesser quality.

Just passing along some potentially incorrect second-hand information.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:31 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjp2 View Post
I've heard that the Lincoln welders sold at the big box stores have different internals than those sold at welder supply places. Part #s are the same but internals are of a lesser quality.

Just passing along some potentially incorrect second-hand information.
Haven't heard that, probably true though.... I pretty sure that companies like Lincoln make units just for The Big Stores... "Home Depot Special"
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:12 PM   #36
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I appreciate ALL the inputs.

YES, i have considered many things and have looked at many angles and other possibilities into my decision on choosing a welder for my applications.

I obviously don't know much about the power outlets and their voltages (to include the amps each hold) in my house, so therefore my dilemma on choosing a 110 vs. a 240 type welder.

Taking classes at a JR college has also been considered, but i feel that doing good research and then buying a decent welder to practice may be a better route into "learning" how to weld. some classes take 2-3 courses before anyone can even touch or start the welding process. i feel the best route would be to start doing it to get better at it, while taking precautionary measures to ensure safety of course.

I understand MIG is "easier" and stick "takes more practice". I just don't want to deal with the extra costs of gases and the maintenance that is associated with gases. <<< As stated in my earilier posts, I'm trying to stay on the "simplicity" side as much as possible and not deal with many other potential add-on expences.

Also have checked on Craigslist often, but no good "deals" on there that's local to me. There are a few used lincoln AC 225 "stick" welders. <<< How are these machines, good enough for my application of building tube bumpers and sliders???

http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Cat...et.aspx?p=2493.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:26 PM   #37
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I am a carpenter that works with metal studs and have my welding certs and weld quite often in the light gauge area of 20ga up to 10ga.For most stuff a little 110 unit will get the job done unaided by gas.You can also fill holes you may make with it with easy.The trick is pratice and settings.Most units have a referance for the gauge of metal you are working with but most times depends on the welder himself and the speed you drag your weld at.I wouldnt bother with the stick ,that is a more advanced and angle of rod and such weight out more to the end product and with lighter gauges and lack of experance = burn throughs.A class may help but just working with it will teach you the most.Good luck!
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:32 PM   #38
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I love the old 225 stick and use it at work often with 6018 rod,but with your experance level it is going to frustrate the hell out of you.During welding cert classes for my apprenticeship guys get welding rage going after a bit.I would stick to the wirefeed
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:43 PM   #39
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take the welding class you were talking about before making your choice. i hate useing wire feed machines and would never consider purchasing a 120 machine. sure they are nice for little thin stuff but your range of use is very limited. i also weld for a living and maybe am a little picky. any kind of welding is frustrating to learn but i would stick weld before mig/flux. tigging is really the way to go however machines plugged into your home will never be able to produce enough heat. also a good grinder helps too
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:47 PM   #40
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If you are welding 3/8's and up steel the stick will be alot easier to use for a novice depending on the rod you use as they all burn and pentrate different.With 6018 rod All you really need to do in maintain a 45 degree angle,and keep the rod away from the project about the same as the diameter of the rod you are using.If you get your amps figured out its damn near point and drag.Be smooth But like I said pratice!Oh and dont move faster than the puddle,as the puddle moves stay with it like a riding a wave.
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