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Geode 10-05-2012 12:54 PM

Geode's plumbing build
 
1 Attachment(s)
So I have been getting some good advice on the "ask the plumber" thread. It was suggested I start a "build" thread, which makes sense.

I started out by replacing my water main with new 1" copper (we dug the trench by hand). See thread below for where it all started, and where it may go wrong.....http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/off...lumber-11.html

At this point the task is to install a new high efficiency direct vent water heater.
Though I do need to pour a few cubic feet of concrete first for the water heater to sit on. A structural engineer signed off on the design, which will entail epoxying rebar into the existing footing etc.

But before I commit to the water heaters final location location, I want to rough in the water heater so I'll no exactly where to pour the concrete.....

Geode 10-05-2012 04:14 PM

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Starting with the piping first. Plumbing inspector says there is no need for an expansion tank (no check valve in the system).

A link to the Polaris water heater. http://www.americanwaterheaternews.c...ts/polaris.htm

Geode 10-15-2012 09:04 PM

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I'm making some progress. I have begun the rough in of the plumbing.
I heated up and bent two pieces of rebar for the concrete water heater support and finished most of the concrete form.

Next up is to get the green light from the plumbing inspector that the location is good.

Then I'll drill the 3/4" holes in the concrete for the rebar, followed by an inspection from the city building inspector.

If that goes well, I'll glue my rebar in with ceramic epoxy, install the concrete form and pour the concrete. Followed by yet again another inspection.

Then with a nice concrete support for the water heater I'll get serious about finishing up the rough in and get that bad boy running....

Kolunatic 10-16-2012 04:14 PM

Very good job .

Geode 10-16-2012 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kolunatic (Post 5846712)
Very good job .

Hey thanks!

Geode 10-16-2012 06:50 PM

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Got the holes for the rebar drilled, next up will be gluing them in.

TRD Larry 10-17-2012 09:38 AM

Did you consider a tankless water heater. Don't know know what you water demand is but the tankless might have been easier and less work.

Pugga 10-17-2012 09:42 AM

Once I found Pex pipe, I'll never go back to sweating copper again :cool:

Geode 10-17-2012 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TRD Larry (Post 5849750)
Did you consider a tankless water heater. Don't know know what you water demand is but the tankless might have been easier and less work.

The heat source will handle domestic hot water and radiant heat for the home. The source I went with was recommended by the company that designed my radiant heat system. http://www.nrtradiant.com/

Geode 10-17-2012 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pugga (Post 5849763)
Once I found Pex pipe, I'll never go back to sweating copper again :cool:

I can understand that!
The wife would never hear of using anything but copper ;)
And as she has removed over 75 cubic yards of dirt from the basement in 5 gallon buckets she will get the copper :D

I'm an electronics technician/engineer. I do a tremendous amount of electrical soldering by hand, mostly surface mount stuff. So I'm really enjoying sweating the larger stuff, it is like magic for me.

Geode 10-17-2012 10:01 AM

Thanks for the reply's everyone. Be sure and check out the posts I put up in the "ask a plumber" section if you want more background on my project.
It is quite involved and interesting, at least to me ;)

It all started with hand digging and replacing my water main.

Kolunatic 10-17-2012 05:29 PM

Looking good.

I like tankless heaters. I work on them but don't have one. And your application is not for a tankless.

Pugga 10-17-2012 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geode (Post 5849825)
I can understand that!
The wife would never hear of using anything but copper ;)
And as she has removed over 75 cubic yards of dirt from the basement in 5 gallon buckets she will get the copper :D

I'm an electronics technician/engineer. I do a tremendous amount of electrical soldering by hand, mostly surface mount stuff. So I'm really enjoying sweating the larger stuff, it is like magic for me.

I hear ya there. I much prefer sweating pipes to electrical soldering. I still sweat anything that will be seen using the old school brass fittings (those suckers take a LOT of heat). The old fittings go well with my hold house, looks original. I then stubbed copper into the basement and transferred everything to pex. I like it for the freezing. The stuff expands 3x it's size before bursting so for my plumbing running in the basement and crawl space, it was a no brainer.

Your project looks great, nice work :thumbsup:

Kolunatic 10-17-2012 05:34 PM

Especially when a 100' roll of pex costs less than 30$!

Geode 10-21-2012 06:27 PM

Rebar phase
 
3 Attachment(s)
I passed my rebar inspection on Friday and just finished pouring the 1/2 circle for my water heater support.

The first photo is of my Hitachi SDS hammer drill with several bits. For the 3/4" holes I started with a 1/2" bit followed by the 3/4". I could have used just the 3/4" bit, but there was a chance I would hit some internal rebar, I figured better to ruin an old 1/2" bit then the new 3/4".

After drilling, I used a wire brush with a home made extension to clear the holes out. I also blew out the holes with compressed air. Then using an injection gun with a long nozzle I injected Epcon 6 ceramic epoxy in to the holes. Work fast on this, the set time is less than ten minutes. Also shown is a support I made to hold the rebar in the proper place while drying.

Geode 10-21-2012 06:48 PM

Concrete form
 
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Prior to installing the rebar, I used a wood 4" x 4" to compress the ground where the concrete will be.

I drilled 3/16" pilot holes for attaching the concrete form with Tapcon concrete screws (1/4" x 3 1/4"). Then we made sure the form had sealed up tight against the existing concrete.

A few pictures of my two electric mixers and the raw aggregate I started with. The form took 4.5" cubic feet of concrete to fill up.

The last picture shows the finished product. Note the external brace I put in, just to be safe (in case the Tapcons were to pull out).

I also used my small concrete vibrator after filling up the form to remove air bubbles and liquefy the concrete so it consolidates and self levels (very cool tool).

Lastly I attached a photo of an old tree on my property, the only tree....
My arborist estimates the tree's age at 225 to 250 years old. It a slow growing Burr Oak tree.

Geode 10-24-2012 09:52 AM

Running pipe in the floor joists
 
I'm interested in your alls thoughts on this.

I have 7 1/2" floor joists. I'll be cutting 1" holes through near the middle of the joists to run the pipe.

I have an HVAC duct that takes up all the bay near where it ends. I heard that they have flexible ducting to handle this?

It dawned on me that I could use 45 degree elbows to lower where the pipe is in the offending joist, but these seems kind of stupid :eek:

Thanks

Kolunatic 10-24-2012 02:43 PM

Are ya talking duct? Then yes. Get the good stuff. You can get at Lowe's. They also have transition fittings.

Geode 10-24-2012 03:10 PM

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There is a heating and cooling duct that terminates against the wall. I would like to run my copper pipe up in the floor joists about 18" away from the outside wall. But there is a circular duct in the bay. Not sure how best to avoid it. I've attached a photo, hopefully that will help some.
Thanks

Kolunatic 10-24-2012 03:46 PM

I think I understand. You can use the fiberglass insulated duct for that area to offset the pipes.


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