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Old 04-18-2010, 04:11 PM   #1
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motorcycle buying guide

I want to finish my Blazer and sell it for a motorcycle. I'm looking into getting a CBR 600 or if by freak chance, a GSXR 600. So I was talking to my friend and he said that purchasing a used motorcycle is a bad idea, as well as not buying anything below the year 2005.
I would rather get advise from people that actually have a motorcycle as well as have bought one. I'm mainly looking for a used bike, nothing like the older models that have the boxed tails, something more with the pointed ones.

examples only:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/3035575...65020/sizes/l/

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst...691678108.html

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb...693506084.html

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst...696902307.html
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:21 PM   #2
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There is nothing wrong with buying a used bike, nor an older one. Just do your research and look out for one that has been abused. The guy who bought my bike got one heck of a nice machine at a good price.
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:35 PM   #3
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There is absolutely nothing wrong with buying used. There are a ton of good used bikes out there. Sounds like your friend works for a dealer and is only looking to sell you a brand new bike.

I only bought my current bike new because it was $4k. My next will be the CBR 600 and it will be used because I have no desire to spend $12k for a new bike. I wouldn't buy one with a lot of miles on it. For me anything over 10k on a bike is too much. But that's just me.
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:38 PM   #4
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If a used bike was maintained well, there is no reason to not buy it. Usually if the seller is vauge with his answers about previous maintenance, I would stay away from the bike. A good used bike will have a good owner. A lot of GSXR/CBR/YZFR owners tend to be on the young and somewhat wreckless side. Not all are, but you don't see many 45 year olds riding wheelies down the interstate. Don't be afraid to ask as many questions about the bike as you can think of, oil changes, valve adjustments/checks, and anything else you want to know. Be patient and the right bike won't be hard to find. One thing to consider is cost of ownership. Different manufactuers have multiple 600cc in-line 4's that are recognized differently by the insurance companies. An R6 will cost more to insure than a YZFR6. The R6 is in a higher class than the YZF, therefore it is more to insure. Just some things to consider. The bikes you have examples of seem to be priced reasonably for my area if not on the low side.
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:44 PM   #5
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Your friend is a numbskull. Don't listen to him. Are you a first time sportbike owner/rider? How old are you? What's your driving record like? If you are new to sportbikes, I would most definitely purchase something used. Do not buy a sportbike without first finding out what your insurance is gonna cost!
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjh View Post
An R6 will cost more to insure than a YZFR6. The R6 is in a higher class than the YZF, therefore it is more to insure.
Those are the same bike. Yamaha offers an YZF-R6 and a YZF-R6S which are not similar at all. The R6 is basically a track bike that is terrible for the street and the R6S is a really good all arounder.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WTtoolman View Post
Those are the same bike. Yamaha offers an YZF-R6 and a YZF-R6S which are not similar at all. The R6 is basically a track bike that is terrible for the street and the R6S is a really good all arounder.
You got the models right, I was bass ackwards on the r6's. The YZF-R6S might be the better choice for a first time rider. Don't buy more bike than you are capable of handling. It is really easy to get in a lot of trouble on a bike that is capable of 140MPH+. I guess that is why I haven't purchased a sportbike. What is the point of being able to go that fast if you aren't going to. My v-strom, VTX and DRZ are plenty of fun to ride, but none of them are blessed with enormous amounts of horsepower.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:06 PM   #8
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My first bike was an Honda f4i which I bough for $4,300. Put around 5,000 of my own miles on then sold for $4,000 to a friend. Now I own an CBR 600rr which is definably more of a sport bike then the F4i. I take good care of my bike and it's battery so it's been really reliable. Many friends who slack on their maintenance stall occasional and lights and it's funny. See what's available around you and do some research on the bike and see if you can sit on it. I've ridden a lot of my friends bikes and some just instantly from the position would make me not buy it. Here's my bike with about 7,200 miles.

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Old 04-18-2010, 05:15 PM   #9
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Stay away from a used gsxr's if possible. Most newbies/Choads are all about gsxrs! I'm sure there are a few out there that haven't been laid down, but for the most part, a used gsxr will have been beat to hell and hacked up. Oh, it's also a bad sign if the previous owner has anything with an ICON logo on it!
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:15 PM   #10
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I'd say go for a used bike, especially if its your first one. I think most everyone covered this point...but I'd also add a few things:
1. year model; I'd say biggest practical reason would be to differ between FI and carb'ed, many earlier japanese sportbikes went FI around 03' ...I have dealt with both and the fuel injection is just so much more convenient

2. do your research once you decide on a model...it's a plus if the previous owner has paper records and maint. logs

3. the whole R6S vs (current) R6 vs. YZF 600R and whatever makes a beginner bike goes something like this...1999-2002 was the gen1 R6. (carb'ed) 03-05 is gen2 R6. After 2005, Yamaha decided to make a new R6 model (R6R) and keep the old 2nd gen body style as the R6S...

and out of those cl ads, the yellow cbr would be my bet...
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:17 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WTtoolman View Post
Those are the same bike. Yamaha offers an YZF-R6 and a YZF-R6S which are not similar at all. The R6 is basically a track bike that is terrible for the street and the R6S is a really good all arounder.
The R6R is not terrible for the street. Yeah it shines on the track but to say it's terrible...come on now.

The top bikes right now imo are the Yamaha R6R and the Honda CBR600RR. You really can't go wrong with either. I personally own a 2008 Yamaha R6R. My bro has a CBR600RR. I really like the comfort of his (minus the seat) but as far as performance goes, It can't touch the smile the Yamaha puts on my face. In the end it's really what you are most comfortable on and what appeals to you aesthetically the most.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:45 PM   #12
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here, got this from another forum
Quote:
Originally Posted by skr00zloose View Post
This is in response to those wanting a sticky for general bike buying info (especially when looking for a first bike). Hopefully it'll help people out in thier searches. I'm not going to go over specific bikes here, just general guidelines from experience in the area. In no way am I trying to push anyone towards one bike or another, just a helping hand in what to look for to help them along the way. If the mods want to sticky it, so be it, if they want to delete it, that's fine too. Anyway, here we go:

There seems to be alot of people wanting opinions on bikes around here lately. Honestly, I think people are asking the wrong questions. It shouldn't be "what's the best", it should be "I want a bike that does this, this and this", or "doesn't do this", "what would be a good direction to look in". Most of the modern sporkbikes (since that's what most people here ride and/or are looking for) are so close performance wise that 99% of the street riders could never tell the difference beyond seating position and things of that nature. Everyone has thier likes and dislikes. If people would give more information (what are you wanting to do with your bike is a good example). You can get better info than just asking "what's the best bike i can get for such and such money". "Best" is a relative term.

Alot of riders have a superiority complex when it comes to thier bikes. Everyone's gotta have the biggest, fastest, shiniest, whatever. Then there's the whole brand loyalty thing, and alot of people will only reccomend the brand that they ride, since it's "obviously" the best, even though they have little to no real experience with bikes across the board. There's alot of choices out there, get what makes you happy. No matter what you do, there's gonna be haters.

I hope that didn't come across wrong, not trying to be an ass, just trying to help people get what they're looking for in buying a bike.

Bikes are only as safe as the person on it.
I'm not gonna say that you should go for a 600/750/1000/etc, that's completely up to you. If you're level headed enough to respect the power of a liter bike, have at it. Just keep in mind that it's a bit easier to get yourself into a bad situation with 170hp than it is with 120hp. If only because it takes experience to be smooth enough with your inputs to the bike to use it to it's advantage. The typical street rider, honestly, doesn't have the ability to use a 600 to it's potential, let alone a 1000. That's not a shot at anyone, it's just how it is. I've noticed that the twistier the roads are in a particular area, the smaller the bikes you tend to see in that area. Smaller/less powerful bikes are easier to ride faster thru the twisties because the problems that not being smooth cause are less aparent on a 600 than a 1000. That's just the way it is. I guarantee if you had a chance to ask a moto gp rider what it's like to ride thier bikes, they'd say it was freakin scary, and they do it for a living!!

As for bike recomendations, above and beyond what particular bike to get, concentrate on getting something that isn't beat on. Unfortunatly, used sportbikes that HAVEN'T been dropped are a rarity. Look around for something that is in good shape to begin with, and you'll be much happier, especially with little to no riding experience under someone's belt. A beat up bike may be a better deal, and alot of people say to get something "less pretty" b/c you'll probably drop it, but a beat up bike probably has problems more than skin deep, and i don't mean just the motor. Worn bearings in suspension parts, leaky fork seals, etc can be alot more unsafe than a poorly running motor. Your best bet is to have a knowledgable friend come along and look at/ test ride the bike with you. An experienced opinion goes a long way. I've seen some people buy some really ratty bikes for way too much money because they didn't know any better. A shiny paint job doesn't mean much if things under that plastic aren't right. ( "chrome don't get ya home" )

Everyone has thier opinions, every bike has it's plusses and minuses. Get whatever makes you grin. In the end, it's your bike, and you're the one riding it.

With that being said, here's a few key things to look for when buying a bike:

First and foremost, make sure it's got a legit title. There are alot of scam artists in the world. Check the vin number on the bike (on the steering stem of the frame) against the numbers on the title. If the vin on the bike looks like it's been stamped by hand, turn around and walk away, you don't want that drama.

As far as mechanicals, look for anything obviously damaged, bent, leaking, etc. Look the bike over for broken or missing bolts and hardware. Check all the lights, tires, brakes, etc. Basically like would be done in a state inspection. I know alot of people don't know how to check brake pads, but it's very simple. On most bikes if you look down the middle of the brake caliper from the front or rear of the bike, there's enough room to see the pad and how much life is in it. A flashlight comes in handy here. Threads showing in tires are a no-no. Look down the front of the bike front the riders viewpoint. Straighten the bars. Is the front wheel pointing straight? If it's tweaked to one side or the other, that could be a sign of a decent hit in the front end. A small amount of tweak may just be forks not properly aligned in the triple clamps. More extreme tweak could be alot of things (or a combination of things) like bents forks, axle, triple clamps, handlebars, or even the frame.

Bounce the suspension up and down a few times, does it feel smooth? After bouncing it a few times, run your finger across the forks near the seal, if you get a bunch of oil on your finger, the seals are shot. If thiers surface rust in the general area of the fork seal, you're gonna have continuous fork seal problems in the future unless you replace the tube itself, and they're not cheap. Do the same on the rear shock if you can get your finger in there. Any oil or greasy build up is a good sign of a leak.

Sit on the bike, and roll the bike back and forth while tapping the front brake. Any play in the steering stem bearings usually shows up as a "clunk" in the front end, sometimes you can even feel it in the handlebars. That's usually a sign of poor maintenance, or a wheelie happy owner (but not always). While your on the bike turn the bars back and forth, they should move easily from one side to the other smoothly, without binding on anything. Also, the bars should never come in contact with the gas tank. (Though sometimes it may pinch your hand in between the bar and the tank, some bikes are just like that).

Have someone hold the bike straight up and down, and grab each one of the wheels from the top (or as close as you can get) and try to move the wheel side to side in a way that it's not meant to move (like trying to "rock it" on it's axle, if that makes sense). Any play at all is too much and may require new wheel bearings. Also, while the bike is straight up anyway, check the oil level. (level is always checked with the bike straight up). Is it at the proper level? Does it look relatively clean? A low oil level could be from a leak, or it could be burning oil while it's running (expensive), or it could have just not been changed regularly, or properly. There's alot of variables there. Check all the other fluids while your at it. Radiator fluid should be clean looking and at the proper level, brake and/or clutch fluid should look almost clear, not black or dirty. Check out the brake lines for any pinches or dry rotting. Brakes aren't something you want to be "iffy".

Check the chain and sprockets. Any teeth missing? (aluminum sprockets pop teeth when they get very worn) Any obvious wear on the sprocket? Are the teeth starting to "arc" over? Is the chain loose and/or dry and rusty? Any visible kinks in the chain? Any of that and you'll need a new set. How soon that may be depends on the extent of the wear.

Ok, now that that's out of the way, go ahead and start the bike. Did it start? (dead givaway there people) Did it start easily or take a while to fire? Hard starting could be numerous different things. Anything from dirty carbs to bad plugs, bad gas, weak battery, etc. After the bike warms up let it sit and idle for a while. Does it idle? (especially off the choke) Is the idle smooth or erratic? Does it sound like it's running on all cyclinders? Any smoke from the exhaust? Dark smoke is usually burning oil or a very rich carb setting, white smoke is usually burning water (coolant) and is a good sign of a blown head gasket. If the bike smokes alot for a minute or two then clears up, it may be in need of valve guide seals. If the bike hasn't been started in a while and you see a puff of smoke from the exhaust when you FIRST fire it up, i normally wouldn't be too concerned about that.

While it's sitting there running for a while, check for leaks again. Pressure builds up in the motor and cooling system as the bike runs and will reveal leaks you may not have seen before. Let the bike run for a good while and keep a check on the temp guage (or idiot light). Most cooling fans don't come on till around 220 degrees. Let the bike get up in that range and make sure the fan kicks itself on. There are alot of bike running around with the fan on a toggle switch to keep cool better when in traffic for long periods. If so, flip the switch and make sure the fan comes on.

Almost time to ride, but FIRST..... check the tire pressures.

As for the test ride, there's alot of things to keep an eye out for. Do the wheels feel wobbly? Could be bent if so. Do the brakes work smoothly or do they pulse or shake when you use them? Warped or bent rotors can cause both. A small bend or warp will be more noticable at a higher speed. The steering should be fairly nuetral feeling, and respond to what you do without alot of fuss. Shift thru all the gears, it should go into every gear relatively easy. The clutch should work smooth and not be jerky when taking off from a stop or when shifting. (alot of that will be about the rider's ability though). The bike shouldn't pop out of any gear when you give it gas. That's usually a sign of transmission problems (bent shift forks, bad shift drums, etc). Run the bike down the road at a normal pace, but shift a gear or two high, and give it a handfull of gas. A slipping clutch will become more apparent like that. If the bike revs high for a secong, then comes back down, but doesn't accelerate much, it may soon be time for a new clutch.

Generally just put a few miles on the bike and see if you notice anything you feel as abnormal. (You did take the msf right? you should have SOME idea what "normal" is )

If everything checks out, ride back to the seller and start haggling. Anything that has come up in the inspection and test ride can be used to try and get the seller down on his price. Keep in mind, anything can be fixed, for a price. It's up to you to decide if any other money that would have to be put into the bike is worth it or not.

I'm sure I missed a few things in writing this, feel free to add to the list. It's taken me a while to write this, and I'm tired, so anything else anyone wants to add is ok by me.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:47 PM   #13
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As I do agree with some of what has been said previously, I also disagree a little as well.

I would go with the yellow CBR. I am partial to Honda though. Mileage isn't something that would throw me off when purchasing though. My current Bike is a 07 CBR1000RR, and has 16K on it. Some people say that I couldn't get what I wanted for it, because of all the miles. BUT, if you have to ask how many miles are on it, and they don't post them, -1 point. Someone that takes care of their bike, Most likely took it to the same mechanic, or has all the paperwork. If possible, have a mechanic look it over. I personally would make them take the bodywork off before buying a used bike, because when you lay one down, the color will transfer to the metal underneath.

My best friend has a 98 CBR600F3, and I would buy it from him if he would part with it, and it has 60+k on it.

Finally, your height will have a little to do with your comfort level. The newer the bike, the more your body is positioned leaning forward. I'm 6'4", so my longer arms let me sit up more than my BF who is 5'7". Longer distances are going to be more comfortable for me.
AND as everyone has been saying, once you decide, do your research. If you go by what someone else says, you are only going to get what they think. I'm a prime example. Like I said previously, I am a honda guy.

Good Luck.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmerchant3 View Post
The R6R is not terrible for the street. Yeah it shines on the track but to say it's terrible...come on now.

The top bikes right now imo are the Yamaha R6R and the Honda CBR600RR. You really can't go wrong with either. I personally own a 2008 Yamaha R6R. My bro has a CBR600RR. I really like the comfort of his (minus the seat) but as far as performance goes, It can't touch the smile the Yamaha puts on my face. In the end it's really what you are most comfortable on and what appeals to you aesthetically the most.
Hey I know you, whats up! I own a R6 as well...
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:48 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmerchant3 View Post
The R6R is not terrible for the street. Yeah it shines on the track but to say it's terrible...come on now.
Being a motorcycle mechanic, and having ridden every japanese sportbike made in the last 10 plus years, the 2006+ R6 has the least midrange power or any 600cc repli-racer. Off idle until 10,000 is just painful! I'm not saying it's a terrible bike, it's just not ideal for the streets where that part of the powerband is where it will be mostly ridden. No offense, guys!
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:51 PM   #16
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ONE MORE THING..............its a smart idea to get the VIN #, and run it by your Police Dept, to see if there is a tag on it. Looked at one, that ended up being stolen when I had the VIN run.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:58 PM   #17
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Name: Roland
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i hated my r6 on the street... no low end power, you gotta rev the snot out of it to get any power. ok on the street but not fun when you wanna ride relaxed. my buddy had an r6s that was really calm and docile when you want it to be but still shits n gets.

X2 staying away from used gsxrs. the reason new guys buy em are because insurance is real cheap for new riders since suzuki finance doesnt require full coverage.

i would stick to a fuel injected bike for reliability. used bikes are fine. I had a hayabusa i put 56000 miles on in 3 years. got side swiped on the road but didnt go down and it blew a hole in the case. i didnt realize and was following the ahole who hit me and the oil light came on so i shut it down. the dealer checkedthe engine for damage due to oil starvation and nothing, engine was within factory specs for a new engine... and i was NOT gentle on that bike...
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:00 PM   #18
The Little Truck That Could
Yoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shed
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WTtoolman View Post
Being a motorcycle mechanic, and having ridden every japanese sportbike made in the last 10 plus years, the 2006+ R6 has the least midrange power or any 600cc repli-racer. Off idle until 10,000 is just painful! I'm not saying it's a terrible bike, it's just not ideal for the streets where that part of the powerband is where it will be mostly ridden. No offense, guys!
x1000000 had my r6 for 3 months

to the bikes defense im 6'5 and 275 and my other bike was a hayabusa
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:09 PM   #19
BUSATODD
busatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shedbusatodd is one of the sharper tools in the shed
 
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bikes

id go with an honda, and thats coming from someone who rides a suzuki!
most hondas are bullet proof, why do you think most stunt riders are riding honda 600s or 900s? its all up to you, you should be able to look at a bike and tell if its been abused or taken care of. milage isnt a big deal, as long as bike hasnt been abused. i sold a 89 cbr 1000 with 35k on it, and it ran like a top.
i ride a 08 hayabusa and it has 18k on it, and it looks brand new.
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:12 PM   #20
The Little Truck That Could
Yoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shedYoytoda is one of the sharper tools in the shed
 
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Name: Roland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by busatodd View Post
id go with an honda, and thats coming from someone who rides a suzuki!
most hondas are bullet proof, why do you think most stunt riders are riding honda 600s or 900s? its all up to you, you should be able to look at a bike and tell if its been abused or taken care of. milage isnt a big deal, as long as bike hasnt been abused. i sold a 89 cbr 1000 with 35k on it, and it ran like a top.
i ride a 08 hayabusa and it has 18k on it, and it looks brand new.
hey man i had an 89 1000 too!!! good ol' hurricane... CBRs are awesome bikes. i really hate how the new cbr and all bikes for that matter concentrate on high end rather than a little more mid range. Loved the low to mid of my 929rr. perfect power balance.
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