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colby8100 05-10-2013 09:45 AM

wiring opinions
 
Ok I been working on a really hard hit honda and I got it ready for paint. So I decided to start fixing broken wires and they sent a kit of butt connector looking things that are activated by heat. When you heat it up the edges draw up and it has a little ring of solder in the center that melts into the wires. Its a lot faster than soldering then heat shrinking. I was wondering if anyone has any negative feedback on them. I'm about to redo my engine harness for my new ecu and mods and I'm thinking about using these.

Large 05-10-2013 09:46 AM

Use crimp-able butt connectors, electrical tape & heat shrink over it for a good connection. Solder will fail eventually.

colby8100 05-10-2013 09:52 AM

That's normally what I do is crimp them then solder it the heat shrink then tape loom then tape again but these were really neat

Torspd 05-10-2013 01:06 PM

Pictures/brand?

Aw9d 05-10-2013 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Large (Post 6869596)
Use crimp-able butt connectors, electrical tape & heat shrink over it for a good connection. Solder will fail eventually.

Solder fails only if it was soldered bad or there is a lot of stress on the solder joint. Which in a Honda will not happen. I've built custom harnesses for race Honda's and never seen one joint fail.

I've never had any of my solder fail on me. I've been installing stereo's for around 13+ years and doing electrical work for as long as I can remember. I don't use crimps unless there is no other choice (Which is rare).

Personally, solder + heat shrink is the way to go. It will give you the best connection possible. Yes it takes longer but its the best way.

colby8100 05-10-2013 01:18 PM

I don't have a brand its just what the shop stocks

colby8100 05-10-2013 01:21 PM

http://www.tacomaworld.com/gallery/d...510_162009.jpg

Aw9d 05-10-2013 01:22 PM

https://www.easternmarine.com/index....FYU-MgodYnUA6w

colby8100 05-10-2013 01:23 PM

The clear heat shrinks the blue melts into a sealer? And solder melts and bonds

colby8100 05-10-2013 01:23 PM

The ones I have don't crimp

Rich91710 05-10-2013 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Large (Post 6869596)
Use crimp-able butt connectors, electrical tape & heat shrink over it for a good connection. Solder will fail eventually.

Not if done properly.

Rich91710 05-10-2013 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by colby8100 (Post 6870513)
The ones I have don't crimp

I would not use that type.

Solder is to ensure a good electrical connection.
Prior to soldering, you need a good mechanical connection, whether it be a western union or a crimp connection.
The solder prevents corrosion from degrading the connection over time, and helps prevent vibration from degrading the mechanical connection.

Solder joints that fail are generally caused by one of several issues:
1) Connection overheated and the solder crystallized (not common).
2) Conductors overheated and solder wicked along the stranded conductors beyond the stabilized connection area... the stranded wire has become "solid" and is prone to break from vibration if not supported (very common).
3) Cold joint - Joint not properly heated, solder applied to the iron tip and merely flowed around the conductors encapsulating them, but not creating a bond. Apply heat to the joint, and apply the solder to a part of the joint away from or on the opposite side of the tip. The solder should melt and be drawn into the joint. If it balls up on the surface, it will not create a good joint (extremely common).
4) Improper cleaning - Old solder, flux is no longer good or even present, conductors oxidized and not cleaned. IF you get it to "stick", it will be a cold joint.
5) Improper flux - Acid flux should NEVER be used for electrical work. Even if rinsed off, the flux has wicked back into the stranded conductors and the copper will corrode and fail within months (common among the inexperience with a "plumber friend").

colby8100 05-10-2013 01:43 PM

I'm assuming the blue is a glue I didn't trust them so I lapped two pieces of wire slid it one melted it and pulled hard and it took a lot to break the wire but they are new to me

Rich91710 05-10-2013 02:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by colby8100 (Post 6870582)
I'm assuming the blue is a glue I didn't trust them so I lapped two pieces of wire slid it one melted it and pulled hard and it took a lot to break the wire but they are new to me

If you had a solid western union prior to slipping the connector over, then you're in better shape than most people who use these.


http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/att...1&d=1368220791


Personally, I use the western union, solder, and an adhesive-lined 3M shrink tubing. It costs twice as much as regular shrink tubing, but the entire inside is lined and the result is completely weatherproof.
All of my wiring on the motorcycles or under the hood uses that. Anything in the cab uses regular heat shrink.

newertoy 05-10-2013 02:30 PM

that is a first--SOLDER connections fail--
Not if done correctly--I am NOT familiar with the type listed here.
Solder is the best form of connection.
EXAMPLE--copper water pipes in your house.
Former MARINE Tech--we soldered EVERYTHING.
Keeps out corrosion-best electrical BOND.

deez 05-10-2013 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by colby8100 (Post 6870505)

They're called solder splices. The blue rings on each end melt to seal the ends up.

deez 05-10-2013 04:39 PM

Speaking from professional experience (as a wiring loom designer and builder), Rich91710 pretty much nailed it.

Solder shouldn't be used as a primary means of splicing wires together. If done correctly, a mechanical crimp (with SCL or marine-grade heatshrink over it) will suffice. But the key here is a proper crimp. Too tight of a crimp and you stress the wire strands, which can lead to breakage from vibration. I think we all know what a loose crimp can lead to.

Don't cut corners with wiring. Do it right the first time. Trust me, the time invested now will save you from potential headaches and issues in the future.

colby8100 05-10-2013 05:10 PM

I do western mine I'm certified in automotive wiring and air bag wiring I was wondering yous guys (in a yankee voice) opinion I usually do it like deez said but I was wondering if this was a new (same quality) alternative my vote is no

colby8100 05-10-2013 05:11 PM

Ps you can't use mechanical clam on airbags could affect resistance

deez 05-10-2013 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by colby8100 (Post 6871295)
Ps you can't use mechanical clam on airbags could affect resistance

Good to know. No air bags in my field to deal with - primarily EFI and data acquisition/management for racing.

The only time we use those solder splices is to splice a wire onto a shield (shielded cable).


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