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Question about rear shocks and torque specs

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Old 10-06-2009, 11:56 PM   #1
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Question about rear shocks and torque specs

My buddy and I went wheeling today in our 2nd generation tacos and when we got back to starting point to air up we were talking about rear shock possibilities using the OEM mounts. It seems with my J66 Deaver pack that a couple more inches of droop can be achieved with a longer shock. Essentially I'm saying that the shock is the first thing to limit out at full droop. Anybody care to shed some light on the possibility of using a longer shock without installing a shock hoop? Is it possible? Pros and Cons?

Secondly I'd like to start checking the torque on the camber bolts connecting the LCA to the chassis. They seem to move a tad when I do some hard wheeling causing me to go out of alignment. I'm not sure if the alignment shop tightened them up to spec. I'd like to put a torque wrench on them and see. Anybody know what the torque spec on those bolts would be?

Thank You for any replies!
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Old 10-07-2009, 01:04 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzimm001 View Post
Secondly I'd like to start checking the torque on the camber bolts connecting the LCA to the chassis. Anybody know what the torque spec on those bolts would be?
Front suspension lower arm x Suspension cross member 100 ft/lbs

http://www.ncttora.com/fsm/05+/data/...6ta/003032.pdf
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:12 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzimm001 View Post
Essentially I'm saying that the shock is the first thing to limit out at full droop. Anybody care to shed some light on the possibility of using a longer shock without installing a shock hoop? Is it possible? Pros and Cons?!
I'm assuming you're referring to the rear shocks....

Your thoughts are valid - however - You also have to be concerned about 'compression'. The longer the shock you install, the less 'compression' you have in the shock. Essentially - during compression, you want the suspension to hit the bumpstops FIRST. You don't want the shock to bottom out before the bumpstops are reached. Also - you want enough room (at rest) for the shock to perform its main function - shock absorption.

A lot of people will install a bar across the frame with custom shock mounts on the axle and install the shocks in a
/ \ fashion that allows for more droop. However - the more of an angle the shocks are in, they lose their ability to affectively function properly (shock absorption). Having a lot of droop - you also have to make sure everything else (driveshaft) is setup properly.
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Old 10-07-2009, 10:01 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janster View Post
I'm assuming you're referring to the rear shocks....

Your thoughts are valid - however - You also have to be concerned about 'compression'. The longer the shock you install, the less 'compression' you have in the shock. Essentially - during compression, you want the suspension to hit the bumpstops FIRST. You don't want the shock to bottom out before the bumpstops are reached. Also - you want enough room (at rest) for the shock to perform its main function - shock absorption.

A lot of people will install a bar across the frame with custom shock mounts on the axle and install the shocks in a
/ \ fashion that allows for more droop. However - the more of an angle the shocks are in, they lose their ability to affectively function properly (shock absorption). Having a lot of droop - you also have to make sure everything else (driveshaft) is setup properly.

Okay so what your saying is that without making some changes to the rear of the truck such as, adjusting the angle of the driveshaft and allowing for increased compression, its not a good idea to install a longer shock into the oem mounts. I already have a 5100 in place but I was curious if something longer could be used. Seems not without some changes. Thank You for the input!
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Old 10-07-2009, 01:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzimm001 View Post
Okay so what your saying is that without making some changes to the rear of the truck such as, adjusting the angle of the driveshaft and allowing for increased compression, its not a good idea to install a longer shock into the oem mounts. I already have a 5100 in place but I was curious if something longer could be used. Seems not without some changes. Thank You for the input!
It depends....

It's a matter of measurements.

Look at your 5100's now while the truck is sitting flat on the pavement.

Measure the amount of 'exposed shaft' on the 5100 shock (either side).

Then - measure the distance between the bumpstop & the contact point.

The bumpstop should have the least amount and come in contact before the shock bottoms out.
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Old 11-02-2009, 07:51 AM   #8
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That is a good idea if the shock is at an angle then the distance will need to be longer than that of the bump stop some basic geomitry like sine of the angle
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Old 04-20-2010, 01:17 PM   #9
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What is the proper way to measure lift when purchasing shocks?
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