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1.5-2 inch lift that does not limit travel

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by kodiakisland, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. kodiakisland

    kodiakisland [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    NW Arkansas
    Vehicle:
    12 access cab 4x4
    5100s at 0 with 1.6in eibachs, wheelers AAL on non TSB rear, OME N182 rear shocks
    I have a 2012 4X4 access cab with a leer shell. I have 3leaf rear springs that are stressed with just the weight of the shell. I don't wheel it hard, but do go offroad several times a month. I also take long round trips (4-5K miles) with 500+ pounds in the bed several times a year.

    I plan to get the wheeler 3 leaf AAL for the rear and keep the overload spring to give close to 1.5 inches with the leer top.

    I'm not sure what to do up front. I had though of getting 5100s at 1.75 but I don't want to limit travel as I do go offroad frequently. I also want to do this as cheaply as possible as money is tight. I've been thinking of getting 883s with 5100s at 0. If I need to after the springs settle I can go to .85 if needed.

    Do the 883s actually add suspension travel or stay the same as stock? Any better options to go 1.5 inches and not lose travel or possibly increase travel and still stay on a budget?
     
  2. Frogsauce

    Frogsauce Well-Known Member

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    Billies + AAL, Breather housing mod, TruXport Tonneau Cover, Custom Wood Rear Seat Extender, Firestone Dest A/T's, Swing Case
    I'm kind of wondering the same things as you. I am trying to piece together a working solution.
     
  3. Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    Front suspension travel is limited by the shock. By using 5100's at 1.75 or lift springs, you lose down travel but gain up travel. The overall travel length of the shock is unchanged. If you want to gain travel, the only way to do so is to use an extended travel shock.
     
  4. Lumpskie

    Lumpskie Independent Thinker

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    '96, 4x4, v6, manual hub
    Toytec 16" coilovers with Tundra Bilstein 5100s, Light Racing UCAs, Alcan Leafs with Orbit Eyes, 12" Bilstein 7100 short Bodies, ARB rear locker, 33x12.5 Duratracs, CBI sliders, Bushwacker fender flares, self made front bumper, M8000, Vision X 6.7" Hi/Lo Beam HIDs, full skids, Inchworm dual case setup - 15º clocking
    Like Pugga said, a longer shock up front is what nets you extra travel. Here's how to think about it. You are pinned at your LCA and your wheels move in an arc about that point. So, you can basically draw a circle around your LCA mount that arcs about it's length. A stock suspension with move along that arc with it's up travel limited by spring compression and down travel limited by the extended length of the shock. When you lift, you get extra travel by getting a shock that allows your suspension to down-travel along that arc farther.

    So, I'd get a longer spring that will compress down to where your stock spring compresses. And I'd get a longer shock that will allow your extension to be lengthened. For me a first gen Tundra 5100 is ideal on a first gen tacoma. The compressed/extended lengths are perfect for a truck with a lift spring.
     
  5. Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    Keep in mind extended travel shocks should be paired with new UCA's. The stock UCA's do not allow the full range of motion for an extended travel application.
     
  6. Lumpskie

    Lumpskie Independent Thinker

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    Toytec 16" coilovers with Tundra Bilstein 5100s, Light Racing UCAs, Alcan Leafs with Orbit Eyes, 12" Bilstein 7100 short Bodies, ARB rear locker, 33x12.5 Duratracs, CBI sliders, Bushwacker fender flares, self made front bumper, M8000, Vision X 6.7" Hi/Lo Beam HIDs, full skids, Inchworm dual case setup - 15º clocking
    ^True... to a certain extent. Lots of extended setups don't actually bring enough wheel travel to require the extra range of motion UCAs bring. I'd get the coils/spring first and check before spending the money. Another option is to use stock UCAs with the spaced ball joint in it. Those get the same range of motion as extended travel UCAs, but don't have the same strength...

    I guess it just depends on how much travel you're looking for.
     
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