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1st time owning a 4x4. snow chain?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Sprung17, Mar 14, 2009.

  1. Mar 14, 2009 at 10:20 PM
    #1
    Sprung17

    Sprung17 [OP] Member

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    Ok I have not officially owned the truck yet, but within a week or two I will. I've been trying to figure out whether or not if it's necessary to have snow chains for the truck even if it has 4x4. If I get the All Terrain tires for it, would I be able to skip the chains. I plan on taking it to Lake Tahoe. The snow there has been on and off.

    I've been searching this forum, but have not found a solid answer. This is the 1st time owning a 4x4 and I am new to this whole thing.

    So far this community has been very friendly and helpful answering some of my questions. Thanks in advance and hope to join you all soon.
     
  2. Mar 14, 2009 at 10:21 PM
    #2
    TRD4x4858

    TRD4x4858 Taco Traitor!

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    Its a good idea to have chains just incase
     
  3. Mar 14, 2009 at 10:32 PM
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    Sprung17

    Sprung17 [OP] Member

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    chains for all 4 wheels or just the fronts? wait... when not using the 4x4, is it a fwd or rwd?
     
  4. Mar 14, 2009 at 10:35 PM
    #4
    blackhawke88

    blackhawke88 wo ai ni bao bei ^_^

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    when not using 4x4, its RWD. You'll be fine going to Tahoe, my friend with Terra Grapplers and 4x4 does fine in his trips. Just remember, 4x4 makes you go, not stop, so dont drive like you're invincible.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2009 at 10:38 PM
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    nurseboy

    nurseboy Well-Known Member

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    Any vehicle that is 2WD, you put the chains on the affected tires. So if it is a RWD vehicle, you put the chains on the rear wheels. In sever cases where a 4x4 vehicle can not pile through snow or nice, chains are applied to the front wheels when 4x4 is engaged. This is because the motor is in the front, putting more weight onto the tires when the chains, giving the car more traction.

    BTW, i went to mammoth not to long ago and it was snowing pretty crazy. I did bring chains with me just incase, but did not have to put them on. I had my truck for less then 1 month, and the stock tires did very well with traction when 4x4 was engaged. All the other cars, suvs, and trucks that were 2wd ALL had to put chains on.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2009 at 11:13 PM
    #6
    nvdeserted

    nvdeserted Well-Known Member

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    I've been driving over the passes to/from Tahoe all winter in the worst conditions without chains. I'm still on the stock BFG Rugged Trails, and I put it in 4x4... no problems. Just slow down. IF you really NEED chains, the passes will be closed to travel anyway. What I do suggest, if you're really concerned, is to get 2 60lb sandbags to throw in the bed (1 near each wheel well) and then get a good tire gauge and let the air out of your tires to about 28 to 30 PSI.

    Not sure when you plan on comming, but it's going to be sunny and 70* there on tuesday... no snow in the near future.

    Also, you'll see signs around here that sometimes say "CHAINS OR SNOWTIRES REQUIRED", this really only applies to 2 wheel-drive vehicles and freight trucks; put it in 4 and you'll be fine.

    If you decide you want chains for 4wheeling in snow or, I've had great service from this place: http://www.tirechain.com/16INCHTRUCKCHAINS.HTM
     
  7. Mar 14, 2009 at 11:22 PM
    #7
    Sprung17

    Sprung17 [OP] Member

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    thanks for the info everybody. you guys have been very helpful.
     
  8. Mar 15, 2009 at 12:49 AM
    #8
    OBJMS33

    OBJMS33 Well-Known Member

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    California law requires even 4x4 to carry chains. Most say that if conditions go to R3 it will be white out anyhow. R1-R2 chains on passenger cars. I bought some just to be legal. Cost me almost three hundred though!!:eek:
     
  9. Mar 15, 2009 at 1:26 AM
    #9
    ForeRunner

    ForeRunner Scotch before noon. Moderator

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    Having chains is advisable. However, I have found that after living in Alaska the keeping you passenger side in the rough stuff makes a difference.

    A point. I grew up in Arizona and we all know how much snow that area gets. I moved to Alaska and was thrust into 18+ inches of ice on the roadway. You learn real quick what works and what doesn't. Now I am in Seattle and of all the times it has snowed. iced up or been bad out I have not switched into 4wd (except the bad hill or 2) and not had a problem. This is with Rugged Trail tires and BFG Mud Terrains.
     
  10. Mar 15, 2009 at 7:20 AM
    #10
    CometKat

    CometKat Well-Known Member

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    There are times when chains will be required on a 4x4 because the CHP wants to slow people down. It’ll have nothing to do with an R3 or white out conditions. Pretty pathetic, but when half the people think they are rally car drivers because they have 4WD or AWD and another group are driving Prerunner type vehicles you can understand why the cops would just have everybody chain up. I don’t own a set but I live on the Nevada side of Tahoe where the only chain control is a sign telling you to chain up.
     
  11. Mar 15, 2009 at 8:17 AM
    #11
    09 tacoma trd

    09 tacoma trd Well-Known Member

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    you can't put chains on the front if you don't put them on the back.
    i tested this theory a few years ago. i tried different ways on putting chains on will climbing up an snowy and icey hill.
    1. no chains on- made it up 3/4 way up.
    2. chains on front- made it up 1/2 way, front end hopping, shaking truck apart.
    3. chains on rear- made it up all the way in 2 wheel drive.
    4. chains on rear in 4x4- perfect climb. backed down the hill half way down and started at halfway from a stop. drove back up never spun a wheel. easy as pie.
    conclusion- chains on front is no good. put on rear and you can go more places then a 4x4 if you were a 2 wheel drive. chains on both axles and you are gone in skidoo country:)
     
  12. Mar 15, 2009 at 10:20 AM
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    wawireguy

    wawireguy Well-Known Member

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    Just get some of those cheap cable chains and some bungie cords if you're worried about getting over a pass on a regular basis in the winter. I'd go front and rear. If you need to chain up then having em all around can't hurt.
     
  13. Mar 15, 2009 at 10:34 AM
    #13
    Snipe

    Snipe Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if the 05+ have enough room up front for a pair of conventional chains, I do know the owners manual says don't use them up front
     
  14. Jul 28, 2012 at 4:31 PM
    #14
    VE7OSR

    VE7OSR 'interfering with Natural Selection since 1990'

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    some observations with chains.

    Chains on the front of the 2nd Gen with stock wheels/tires, is very tight as there is very little clearance for the part of the chain that grips the side of your tire, on the inside of the wheel between the tire and the spindle. (Cable style passenger tire "chains" would work) I picked up some 1.25" wheel spacers so I can run chains on the front if need be.
    Another technique that will work wonders is to lower your tire air pressure creating a larger footprint, on hard pack or icy conditions. In loose snow, having narrow tires to increase psi on the ground and gain traction through to more solid snow/ground works.

    Chains can help in mud by clearing the muck of the tires, minimizing clogging up the tread, especially if you don't have mudder tires, but find yourself in such conditions occasionally.

    The grab, slip, and shudder with chains on as each wheel gets and looses traction can be unnerving, usually means adjusting the throttle more gradually. On standard transmissions, the clutch may slip and get noticeably hot as well with all the changing torque demands on the engine.

    Tightening the chains after driving a few hundred meters (feet) is necessary, and using bungy cords across the side of the wheel to keep the chains fitting tight is a good insurance policy. If you sense anything at all go wrong ..stop! having the chain come off and whip around destroying body parts, brakelines etc. would not be fun. Carry some spare quick links for repairs, as chains can snap.

    It is fun clawing your way into places others can't get to, or having traction on ice on hills where you have to hang onto the truck when you get out the door so you don't land on your butt.

    They saved the day for me on a few rare occasions, and provide extra weight in the winter when they're not mounted on the tires.
    Enjoy,
     
  15. Jul 28, 2012 at 6:30 PM
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    Utard

    Utard Well-Known Member

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    Nice a dinosaur thread.
     
  16. Jul 28, 2012 at 6:35 PM
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    stunt man hans

    stunt man hans DISPLACED VIKING LIVING IN GEORGIA

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    good year duratracs are phenomenal in the snow check them out they make a huge difference when driving in the snow. i ran a set for a little over a year and had them in the snow a lot they are great just about everywhere.

    i realize that wasn't your question but, most guys at some point end up upgrading tires just food for thought if your going to be spending time in the snow.
     
  17. Jul 28, 2012 at 6:36 PM
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    vbibi

    vbibi Well-Known Member

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    And this is the law! Now, you-re question was about general rule of driving in snow country, you got a lot a good answers, if you want to know the law,
    you got it to.
     
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