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2003 tacoma prerunner dub cab sr5

Discussion in 'Street Trucks' started by dakotab, May 5, 2010.

  1. May 5, 2010 at 3:51 PM
    #1
    dakotab

    dakotab [OP] New Member

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    hey im new and im about to purchase my first truck. toyotas have been a long history in my family we have own one in my my family and im about to get one and i was wondering. How does the prerunner (2wd) do in the snow without chains and with chains. everyone in my family has had 4wd so i dont really know much about the 2wd and how they drive can anyone give me a good solid answer
     
  2. Jun 13, 2014 at 12:40 AM
    #2
    smmarine

    smmarine Well-Known Member

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    First Name:
    Sean
    Melbourne FL
    Vehicle:
    99 Tacoma Prerunner SR5
    Detroit truetrac, LED off-road lights front and back, HID headlights, LED parking, interior, license plate, and reverse light bulbs, 2003 tail lights, Cobra 19LTD Classic CB w/ 102" whip, deck plate mod
    I can't belive nobody answered your question haha
     
  3. Aug 28, 2014 at 10:38 AM
    #3
    sween1911

    sween1911 New Member

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    I think it's highly subjective. Some people have had success with decent tires, chains, some weight in the back, etc. In my opinion and experience (1986 Toyota 4-speed, 2001 Dakota V6 Auto, both RWD-only), an unloaded 2WD pickup with an open diff and no chains in the snow is always on the verge of being stuck. I drove my Toyota a couple miles in almost a foot of snow, but it was a level road. I used to tie pieces of rope around the wheels of my Dakota (through the holes in the wheels and across the face of the tire) to get enough traction to get up a small hill. If you go with a 2WD vehicle, putting weight in the back and having a limited-slip rearend and chains will help, but not as much as 4WD. And if you're going up and down big hills or have worn tires, it's still dicey.

    Hope this helped.
     
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