1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

4WD system

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by inouk, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. Aug 27, 2010 at 8:39 AM
    #1
    inouk

    inouk [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Member:
    #42310
    Messages:
    112
    Gender:
    Male
    Hi,

    I just bought a used tacoma SR5 4x4 2006 with a V6 engine (4.0liters).

    I have some questions:

    1.- Can I enable 4x4 HI on dry pavement? It's a true part-time system or it's a full-time system ?

    2.- Does it have TRAC system on it ?

    3.- Do I need to enable 4x4 HI 1-2 times each month in order to lubricate the transfer case or something like it?

    I asked those questions to the salesmen but he wasn't really sure ...

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Aug 27, 2010 at 8:42 AM
    #2
    Jester243

    Jester243 mod status????

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2008
    Member:
    #7552
    Messages:
    10,004
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    Spokane, WA
    Vehicle:
    2016 Trail Premium 4Runner w/ KDSS
    Do you have any pics of the beast? Welcome to the site :wave:
     
  3. Aug 27, 2010 at 8:44 AM
    #3
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Member:
    #39131
    Messages:
    30,845
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Massachusetts
    Vehicle:
    '13 Ford F-150 SCREW
    F-150 Mod
    1. You can but don't. It's a 4wd system, not part time, not AWD.
    2. No, you don't have the TRAC system the OR versions have.
    3. Mixed reviews on this... I use mine only when I need it which equates to a few times a week in the winter and maybe once or twice all summer. If you do use it, go on grass or some surface where your tires can slip.
     
  4. Aug 27, 2010 at 8:46 AM
    #4
    inouk

    inouk [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Member:
    #42310
    Messages:
    112
    Gender:
    Male
    Wow, you are fast!

    If it's a 4WD but not a part-time, I'm sorry, but I'm not sure I understand ... ? And why "I can but don't do it?" If it's because wheels turns a the same speed while cornering and can accelerate a wear a transfer case (or can blew up), well, it's part-time right?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Aug 27, 2010 at 8:56 AM
    #5
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Member:
    #39131
    Messages:
    30,845
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Massachusetts
    Vehicle:
    '13 Ford F-150 SCREW
    F-150 Mod
    What I meant was, physically there's nothing stopping you from engaging 4wd on dry pavement. You shouldn't because somewhere in your drive train, something has to slip. Every time you corner, every tire is turning at a different speed. In a perfect world, perfectly flat ground, no cornering, you're correct, all 4 tires turn the same speed and no damage is done. In our world, tire pressures vary, there are potholes, and you have to corner at some point. On soft ground, your traction gives way first and your tires spin. On dry pavement, your tires have a lot more grip and transfers all that strain to your axles, differentials and transfer case. Usually your tires will still slip first but eventually something else will slip (meaning you broke something in your drive train). Part time systems allow things to slip somehow, there's sort of a clutch system if you will that a true 4wd doesn't have.

    Plus, if you're on dry pavement, why would you need 4wd?
     
  6. Aug 27, 2010 at 9:04 AM
    #6
    inouk

    inouk [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Member:
    #42310
    Messages:
    112
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks for the explanation.

    I don't want to enable 4WD on a sunny day, but during winter where some portion of roads are fully covered of snow and some aren't during bad weather (backcountry roads where winds are very strong on some area and on those sections, no snow, only dry pavement). So, instead of enabling/disabling constantly I wondered if I could enable it full time.
     
  7. Aug 27, 2010 at 9:05 AM
    #7
    inouk

    inouk [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Member:
    #42310
    Messages:
    112
    Gender:
    Male
    Oh btw, picture will come soon :D
     
  8. Aug 27, 2010 at 11:01 AM
    #8
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Member:
    #39131
    Messages:
    30,845
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Massachusetts
    Vehicle:
    '13 Ford F-150 SCREW
    F-150 Mod
    It's not part time in the sense you have an option of full time vs part time. You are either in 4wd or your not, no in between. Dodge, for example, has another setting on the dash for part time.
     
  9. Aug 27, 2010 at 2:05 PM
    #9
    David K

    David K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    Member:
    #18969
    Messages:
    9,955
    Gender:
    Male
    San Marcos, Alta California
    Vehicle:
    2010 4WD Off Road DC
    Differential Breather Mod Light Bar: 2 Hella 4000 HID, 1 Cibie Halogen. Bilstein 5100s Ride Rite Air Bags
    Enough good answers already... I will add that there is no harm in going in and out of 4WD when you need it/ don't need it.

    In the winter, if you are always in snow, then you could just leave it engaged, sure.

    However, if you are trying to turn into a parking spot or in a covered garage, you will want to get out of 4WD because the binding of the tires on dry pavement makes steering very difficult.

    The front tires/ drive shaft rotates more than the rear drive shaft... in 4WD (part time) since the front and rear are locked together. In full time 4WD/ AWD vehicles, there is a third differential that allows the front and rear to turn independent of each other, and so dry pavement is no problem.
     
  10. Aug 29, 2010 at 8:02 AM
    #10
    inouk

    inouk [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Member:
    #42310
    Messages:
    112
    Gender:
    Male
    There you go ;)

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
To Top