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4x4 Snow Question

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by S1njin, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:05 AM
    #21
    badger

    badger Well-Known Member

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    :facepalm: :D
     
  2. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:17 AM
    #22
    ouyin2000

    ouyin2000 Well-Known Member

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    I didn't mean to be offensive with my comment. Just trying to point in a different direction. There is a lot of information to learn about 4wd systems. Especially for someone who has never driven a selectable 4wd vehicle.
     
  3. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:18 AM
    #23
    badger

    badger Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. If you can find a big empty parking lot to play a little, you will get some feel for what you have. I'll tell you for sure that a Tacoma is not a Subaru. Almost nothing beats a Subaru on an icy road. A Tacoma is very capable though if driven with it's limitations in mind. As mentioned, good tires make a huge difference, and you might consider a set of studless winter tires as well. I have my tires machine center siped. Definitely add some rear weight. I have driven mine many thousands of miles on ice and snow, even with a trailer in tow. I have a lot of confidence in the truck, and I do not have any computer assisted traction utilities. Even the ABS is dissabled. The newer trucks may be better, but the older ones had some issues with ABS on ice. There are several threads you can search up.
     
  4. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:34 AM
    #24
    BlueT

    BlueT Well-Known Member

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    Meh we need more salvage trucks for parts. OP should use skinny tires in winter :D
     
  5. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:37 AM
    #25
    Romo7493

    Romo7493 Member

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    I went from driving an 01 Subaru RS 2.5 to a 2010 Taco Sport. The first week I had it I was driving in the rain and totally forgot what I was driving. Rear end went sliding out pretty good in an intersection at night when it was raining pretty hard. Thankfully no one was next to me. I was able to resist oversteerting to correct and came out of it real quick but still got my heart pounding pretty good.

    That weekend I took it to an empty lot when it was wet out and leaned into some turns in 2wd to find out at what point the rear end starts sliding out. I had a pretty good handle on the limits after about 10 minutes.
     
  6. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:38 AM
    #26
    memario1214

    memario1214 Vivid Illumination Vendor

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    I can't speak for anyone else, but I will tell you how I use the 4WD in the winter. If there's snow on the ground, I am most likely engaged. As long as you're either turning wide enough to not bind or you are giving enough throttle to slip you'll be fine. In the winter I feel fairly confident going about 55 in just about any conditions. Just because I could have maybe made it there in 2WD doesn't mean I did. If the conditions are poor, I use it. That's what it's there for after all. Hell, I have gone 70+ in 4WD on the interstate for largely peace of mind in the winter. Doesn't hurt anything.
     
  7. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:41 AM
    #27
    BlueT

    BlueT Well-Known Member

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    The most important piece of advise is to take it slow. Give yourself a winter to figure out what works for you.
     
  8. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:44 AM
    #28
    memario1214

    memario1214 Vivid Illumination Vendor

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    THIS x10000 I have seen way to many people overstep their boundaries (either driver, vehicle, or both) and get into trouble. That's not to say that trouble can't find any one of us, but find what your boundaries as well as the trucks. These have a very light back end and tent to step out at a moments notice. Just one more of those things you have to learn.
     
  9. Sep 26, 2012 at 10:46 AM
    #29
    XXXX

    XXXX Well-Known Member

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    I say take the truck to a parking lot and learn how to do evasive maneuvers in the snow so OP knows how the truck will react when he panics and the ABS kicks on.

    $0.02

    4x4 is for when your stuck. I never wheel with it on nor do I drive in the snow with it on unless it's 2' deep and I literally can't get the truck moving without it.
     
  10. Sep 26, 2012 at 11:11 AM
    #30
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    You just had to go there, didn't you? :rolleyes:
     
  11. Sep 26, 2012 at 11:38 AM
    #31
    azreb

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    I grew up in Colorado, so had some experience driving in snow. When approaching a curve I instinctively back off the skinny pedal. In 2WD the rear wheels tend to slow the vehicle down. I did that once many years ago in a Scout II with the 4WD engaged on an icy road. With the front axle engaged the front and back ends both lost traction in the curve and the vehicle skidded. I corrected (probably over corrected) and it skidded the other way. I ended up in a creek alongside the road and had to be towed out. Since then I avoid engaging the front axle on slick roads except at slow speeds. I doubt the new Toyotas would respond any differently under the same circumstances. Like someone else said, it is best to take it easy until you figure out what works for you.
     
  12. Sep 26, 2012 at 11:53 AM
    #32
    Nixinus

    Nixinus Well-Known Member

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    Well if you are in a snow storm, you probably are not driving 50+. So lets throw that one out of the discussion. For really bad weather/traction then you are fine using the 4wd but as mentioned many times before, go easy on the turning radius. Our 4wd is not AWD and it will bind the system unless you turn while on a tractionless surface. If you are driving in a straight line (or relatively forward direction) and you are afraid of patches of ice/snow, you can run 4wd (as the manual recommend a 10mile monthly run of the 4wd system regardless of where they have sold the toyota). Myself, I live in sunny socal so its a long shot if we get rain every month and sometimes I just make sure my tire pressures are equal and I can find the straightest road around to engage 4wd at lower speeds for a minute, as recommended. But for the most part I only rely on 4wd on speeds 30 and below. Anything above that and I personally think that it just adds a false sense of security to the driver which is more dangerous IMHO.

    -Evan
     
  13. Sep 26, 2012 at 11:57 AM
    #33
    cgs2k2

    cgs2k2 Ohio Member

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    This.

    If there's snow on the ground (beyond a light brushing), I'm in 4wd. It's there to use. I've had no problems.
     
  14. Sep 26, 2012 at 12:03 PM
    #34
    Kenobe

    Kenobe Well-Known Member

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    A couple winters ago I was going uphill on what turned out to be black ice at 50mph. As the truck started slowing from the climb up the hill (freeway) I gave it a little more gas and my rear end began to fish-tail. I backed off the throttle and put the truck into 4-hi - no more fish-tailing.

    My Mom had a similar situation (and wrecked) with me in the truck years back where we ended up upside down in the snow. She had just switched out of 4wd into 2wd in a big ole F-250. Went up a hill of black ice, truck fishtailed and that was all she wrote.

    In those cases I'd say yes to 4wd every time. Going around corners as mentioned before, well I go too slow in corners to debate it either way. I learned not to 'bake' corners from riding motorcycles.

    Long story short my 4-hi gets used alot in winter, esp around town (when not parking).

    Do what makes you feel safe. Just don't exceed the speed recommended by the manual in 4wd. I think 4-hi limit is 55mph? Forgot, sorry.
     
  15. Sep 26, 2012 at 12:06 PM
    #35
    OZ-T

    OZ-T Did you get your precious photos ?

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    This
     
  16. Sep 26, 2012 at 12:29 PM
    #36
    PaintDrinkingPete

    PaintDrinkingPete Well-Known Member

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    Yup, I'll engage to get around in the snow, but once I'm on the highway, if it's clear enough that I can get up to speed, then I just drop back down to 2WD. If you hit a rough patch, just slow down and re-engage 4WD.

    Once you're moving at speed, 4WD isn't really helping that much anymore -- if you hit ice, the vehicle will slide regardless.
     
  17. Sep 26, 2012 at 12:30 PM
    #37
    stewartx

    stewartx Well-Known Member

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    As I see it, if I'm driving down the road in conditions foul enough (slushy ice, patches of snow, etc) to justify 4wd, I probably shouldn't be traveling at 50+ mph anyway. I'd slow down a bit and consider 4wd only if conditions hindered my progress. I'd also remind myself that 4wd doesn't really help me stop. The truck can still easy slide (stopping, turning, etc) on that mess.

    Off-road, with few or no other vehicles around, might be somewhat different. I'd certainly opt for 4wd quicker. Might also drive a bit more aggressively occasionally, but still wouldn't be speeding around the trails all that much - I'd like to get off that trail eventually, preferably not into the ditch or worse.
     
  18. Sep 26, 2012 at 12:40 PM
    #38
    Nixinus

    Nixinus Well-Known Member

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    Keep her in 4wd but think that its still in 2wd. Although from personal experience in light snow/ice my 4wd was amazing, it is still a false sense of security if you think you will stop like on dry pavement (not saying YOU do, just throwing my finals pennies at this topic).
     
  19. Sep 26, 2012 at 2:30 PM
    #39
    S1njin

    S1njin [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. Sounds like old lady driving in 4hi is the way to go for me. Which is what I was hoping to get out of this. I drive with a lot of respect for the road - I'm no daredevil.
     
  20. Sep 26, 2012 at 2:40 PM
    #40
    XXXX

    XXXX Well-Known Member

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    lol...I just noticed your in NJ like me.

    If we even get any snow this year it will most likely be patchy (some snow and some dry spots). Turning in 4X on dry roads is a big NO NO and most people I know who are not good in driving in snow do run 4X then forget it's on and take a nice tight turns on dry surfaces.

    IMHO in our region you have no need to run 4X, but what do I know. The ONLY time I have needed 4X on a road in 15 years is when I was driving like a jackass and taking people off the line at red lights or passing them.

    If you feel the need to drive with 4X on with a dusting of snow I seriously think you should reconsider driving in snow in public until you know your truck better and feel more confident with your snow driving skillz.

    I didn't see anyone mention you should not be running your normal air pressure if your out driving in more then a dusting of snow. Proper air pressure in the white stuff is KEY.
     
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