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A non-enthusiast's Tacoma build

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Builds (2005-2015)' started by ardrummer292, May 21, 2020.

  1. Apr 12, 2021 at 12:14 PM
    #121
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    2015 DCLB V6 A/T 4x4 1D6
    Overbuilt daily driver
    Snorkels are useful, even for non-offroading normies like me. Not necessary, but great for peace of mind when doing dumb things like ignoring "CAUTION HIGH WATER" signs.

    https://youtu.be/3qS0SIqKmbQ
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
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  2. Apr 17, 2021 at 1:57 PM
    #122
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Austin
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    2015 DCLB V6 A/T 4x4 1D6
    Overbuilt daily driver
    Super quick update: don’t be dumb like me.

    F9CE60A2-33E6-422F-8BBE-31D29CB979B0.jpg

    Black bolts look better short term, but rust never looks good.

    900439B9-21CF-4E4F-BCCA-4C1AAA222D50.jpg

    Oopsie fixed with some stainless steel.

    1BD5B891-7988-4C51-A718-B3C26777C9CD.jpg
     
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  3. Apr 25, 2021 at 12:09 PM
    #123
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    2015 DCLB V6 A/T 4x4 1D6
    Overbuilt daily driver
    Got a pair of fire extinguishers installed today. One Halotron (clean agent / expensive) for use on my vehicle, one dry chemical (nasty, dirty agent / cheap) for use on others' vehicles or for run-of-the-mill fire extinguishing needs.

    0DEAAFA6-58C2-41EF-850F-B9F7ACB7ED32.jpg

    I went to my local 4 Wheel Parts to test-fit some extinguishers and determine the largest size I could fit in the storage bin area behind the driver's side rear seat. Unfortunately, the largest I could stuff in there (while still being able to lock that seat back in the upright position) was a measly 2.5 lb model. Better than nothing, but likely not enough juice if I don't catch a fire early on.

    Finding a flat surface quick detach mount with a sufficiently low profile took a bit of research. After poking around on various websites, I came across the H3R Extreme Duty mount. It came out as the best of the bunch, only pushing the extinguisher cylinder an inch away from the mounting surface.

    Installation was a pain in the ass, but that's par for the course. Removing the storage bin behind the rear driver's side seat was easier than expected, following @boogie3478's video. Note that you don't have to remove your seats in order to pull this off. Also note that some wiggling, coaxing, and coercing will be required. I did say "easier than expected," not "easy."

    https://youtu.be/-N5nTVyXbLI?t=325

    From there, I started measuring and cutting. I had to remove a bit of a plastic "standoff" section in order to get the extinguishers as far away from the seat back as possible.

    D922B50F-9743-4197-9C8E-DC2159020C0B.jpg

    I removed some insulation on the rear of the storage bin to minimize hardware protrusion. This was done to try and reduce any weird interference issues that always seem to arise when adding things that don't belong.

    D49AFAAB-AF19-491D-9E98-8DE888D270DF.jpg

    From there, I figured out which mounting bolts didn't sit flush with the rest. There is a recessed "rib" of sorts nearly running the width of the storage bin, so the interior geometry isn't flat; you have to be careful to keep bolted surfaces as in-line as possible to minimize bending the thin plastic. There were 3 bolts (two for one mount, one for the other) that required a stack of washers to level them out with their neighbors.

    77074E1B-E497-42C5-B114-11E795C2C1B8.jpg

    After this was done, I simply installed all the hardware to secure the mount bases to the storage bin.

    62556977-C1EA-4ABD-9260-30AA10F949C7.jpg

    Now I have a pair of fire extinguishers readily available, while simultaneously out of direct sunlight and in a location unlikely to result in accidental discharge.

    26B8ACFD-821E-45E6-8B0B-ABC8976725B5.jpg
    7119300D-857D-46AC-9C98-0CB84F242471.jpg
    1B170DD3-5CCE-4336-A5A4-9DEEC8F8F19E.jpg

    The "DRY CHEMICAL" and "CLEAN AGENT" tags are from Visitags. I thought it prudent to allow anyone to rapidly identify which type of extinguisher they were deploying; at $35 shipped, why not?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 25, 2021
  4. May 9, 2021 at 12:11 PM
    #124
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    2015 DCLB V6 A/T 4x4 1D6
    Overbuilt daily driver
    Nothing ground-breaking accomplished this weekend, just a thorough wash and wax while I wait for my new-and-improved front camera mount components to show up.

    I did have an interesting realization. Back when I first got my truck 15 months ago, I frequently caught myself staring at it out the window:



    I figured this was due to the novelty of it being my "newest and shiniest thing," and the (admittedly weird) longing stares would wear off with time.

    42374A1B-D25B-405A-9895-60B3B20C9FF7.jpg

    I was incorrect. Whether I'm eyeballing some recently-installed mod or just admiring a well-thought-out and well-maintained vehicle, I still do it all the time. Much to my girlfriend's chagrin, who believes she has been replaced.
     
  5. May 13, 2021 at 1:20 PM
    #125
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    Quick, vague, and useless (from a technical perspective) writeup for the Trail Toys UHMW (plastic) gas tank skid:

    161707282_126315176042950_5890296508396722958_n.jpg

    What is that dumb-looking surfboard in the picture? It's a gas tank skid, stupid.

    Why get a gas tank skid? Because a bucket full of boom-boom juice is worth protecting, or so Toyota thinks. See: the TRD Off Road and its included gas tank skid.

    Why get this particular gas tank skid?
    Partially because it's rust-proof, so no need for regular checkups. Partially because it's relatively inexpensive, at $175 (versus $275 for Mobtown's aluminum skid). Partially because it doesn't require OR-style gas tank straps with threaded studs, which cost an extra $150 for the OEM part. My primary reason for going with this skid is because it's lighter than anything else out there, clocking in at 8 lbs as compared to the Mobtown aluminum equivalent at nearly double the weight (13 lbs).

    What design features make this gas tank skid stand out? It has a "ramped" front section (as most gas tank skids do), which protects the tank fittings from road debris. Due to the attachment method, it also offers a redundant set of support straps to keep the gas tank attached to the vehicle. The latter point isn't really a design feature, since that isn't their intended purpose; it just kinda ended up working out that way.

    What is sacrificed by selecting this gas tank skid? In a head-to-head torture test, I would guess that this skid is less durable than its metal counterparts. That said, the Randynator runs one of these and it has held up just fine. He does some way crazier sh!t in his truck than I ever will, so I'm not worried.

    How bad was the install? Bad enough to warrant adult supervision (thanks to @EatSleepTacos), but I could say that of pretty much anything that has been installed on my truck thus far. We were done in about an hour, including lots of questions from me and some banter about the Colonial Pipeline shutdown tomfoolery.
     
  6. May 22, 2021 at 8:53 AM
    #126
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    It seems that, in a frenzy to throw as much money at my truck as possible, I forgot to perform a useful, simple, and free mod: the ubiquitous 12V power outlet always-on mod.

    I followed these steps:

    I also consulted the handy pictures posted by @EatSleepTacos to ensure that I was pulling the correct relay:

    Once I got the relay removed, I was a little confused about disassembly. Randy was kind enough to identify the point at which the two primary housings are designed to separate:

    12V power outlet relay disassembled.jpg

    I had never seen the inside of one of these things before, so I took my time identifying the moving parts that needed to be rendered immobile:

    320FDF5A-D150-47C2-8506-5EE92945BD19.jpg

    My solder joints are bad enough to be considered a war crime, so there was no way in hell I was going to attempt that method. Instead, I used a short section of ziptie as a shim to push the relay contacts together:

    F4855CEE-1519-4959-8B1F-69DEFA0E19C7.jpg

    From there, I reassembled everything and tested. Not exactly cutting-edge stuff, but past due and certainly useful.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2021
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  7. May 23, 2021 at 12:23 PM
    #127
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    I performed a peculiar mod today: replacing the stock AC power outlet switch with the 3rd gen equivalent.

    69489187-43D3-4A96-A02E-0361DCD52A96.jpg
    3rd gen AC switch.jpg

    I did this to add a little logic to how my switches are organized. Call it OCD, efficiency of movement, or whatever you like; it makes sense to me.

    9340FDF0-0C06-42BD-856C-1D310E898783.jpg

    The tall switches located to the left of the steering wheel are easy to see and easy to access; as such, it makes sense to set controls for functions that may be needed on the fly in this location. The switches located under the center console are not as easy to operate; accessories that are not needed on the move can be located here, in a less convenient location.

    I consulted with TW's resident OEM wiring guru, @caribe makaira, to determine the feasibility of this mod. Once we figured out that it was both possible and low-risk, we assembled a shopping list:

    OEM 3rd gen AC power outlet switch, P/N 84480-04040
    OEM 3rd gen switch connector, P/N 90980-12558
    Male 090/2.3II terminals, qty 5: https://www.hi-1000ec.com/product/1369
    Pre-wired female 0.64III terminals, qty 5: https://www.hi-1000ec.com/product-list?keyword=12870&Submit=Search
    20 AWG 5 conductor wire, 4 ft required: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089SGQ559/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_EH2PZAG7Q6J3V0S7KX81?_encoding=UTF8
    Mating pair of OEM connectors compatible with 090/2.3II terminals: I went with OEM P/Ns 90980-10996 (female) and 90980-11101 (male) since they were the only ones I could find in stock, but there are plenty of options available
    2.3II terminal connectors.jpg

    The idea behind this mod is very simple. Create a wiring harness extension from the stock AC power outlet switch connector:

    2nd gen AC switch connector wiring.jpg

    ... to the 3rd gen's switch:

    3rd gen AC switch connector wiring.jpg

    ... in a resilient and easily-reversed manner. I made a sketch to ensure that I was accurately tracking terminal positions and wire colors:

    19ED9DEA-D4E8-45EE-A0A8-6AB8FC29BD58.jpg

    This helped me understand how the finished product would come together.

    On one end of the wiring harness, I soldered on the pre-wired 0.64III female terminals used for the 3rd gen switch connector:

    E83CB763-4E6B-4F96-91C2-1EC798D967EE.jpg

    On the other end, I crimped on 090/2.3II male terminals. From there, all I had to do was install the new connectors, following my sketch to ensure the terminals were in the correct positions:

    837F87B5-DEAA-49DF-96D6-F0686A28C783.jpg

    The modifications to the existing vehicle wiring are fairly straightforward. I checked the connector wiring scheme to ensure that it lined up with the factory wiring diagram:

    F699063D-2BAB-49E2-9925-FB4AA7EC7831.jpg
    2nd gen AC switch connector wiring.jpg

    Once that was confirmed, I removed the white terminal retaining clip and used a small screwdriver to push the terminals out of the connector:

    6B373321-E53F-4A1B-80B2-2AD4123B28E1.jpg

    The only remaining steps were to insert the terminals into the new connector:

    7AA52328-9607-433D-A7E4-532D35B24A78.jpg

    ... and perform a preliminary function test, which yielded no surprises. The transplant was successful, but not yet complete.

    374FB997-C484-4D48-A8FB-8724A8A0982F.jpg

    I have never removed the lower trim piece that houses the small switches in question. What an absolute pain in the ass it was. I had to pull:

    Lower driver's side trim, including all prerequisites (door sill, kick panel, foot rest, coin holder)
    Glove box
    Shifter panel and knob
    Center console storage
    Center console side trim
    Climate control panel
    Head unit (with the 2TPAM, making things much more difficult)
    Head unit surround trim and 4WD selector, including loosening the gauge cluster trim

    Once all that was removed, I could finally undo the two 10mm bolts holding the trim piece in question. I disconnected the 12V power outlets and took the whole piece to the back of my truck for a closer look:

    E38CF0D1-3EF2-4A54-AF86-E8CEA1B32E6E.jpg

    Oh great, these switch slots are keyed. "Keyed," meaning they will only fit the one switch they are designed to use from the factory. Spoiler alert: 2nd gen Tacomas were not designed to accommodate 3rd gen switches.

    EBC41CA6-06A1-4822-A6A4-204606578F83.jpg

    Problem solved with a round file. Note that I opted to move my USB/aux-in one slot to the right, which is why I had to "re-key" that area as well.

    A horrifying realization crept up on me. I would have to do this whole disassembly process again in the near future in order to install and wire my air compressor and cargo light switches. I decided I would try to minimize any re-work by running 550 cord through the wiring route and terminating it in the corresponding switch blank:

    D1B52BD4-3F4C-4F54-8595-26F968F1B635.jpg

    I'm hoping I can tape the connectors for the new switches to the 550 cord and pull it through. Will it work? I have no idea. It's worth a try, though.

    At this point, all that remained was reassembly. I'll spare everyone the details, since the language involved made this a decidedly non-PG13 evolution. After 4 hours of ass-pain, I managed to get everything back together correctly and working.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2021
  8. Jun 6, 2021 at 2:16 PM
    #128
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    My bed was feeling a bit neglected, so I decided to give it some love in the form of Line-X.

    662F6378-0A23-4D22-A033-E9EC36CA5EC2.jpg

    There's quite a few folks who don't think paying to have a composite bedliner sprayed on a composite bed makes sense:

    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/bed-stiffeners-and-spray-in-bedliner.723755/

    While their dismissiveness make sense on the surface, the truth of the situation is a lot more complicated. The OEM bed is made of fiberglass, which is an excellent choice due to the material characteristics: light, strong, flexible, and corrosion-proof. Unfortunately, composites like fiberglass have one serious disadvantage when compared to metal beds: surface deformations (like gouges and nicks) actually weaken the material at the point of impact, whereas steel beds may dent but won't lose any strength. For you engineers in the audience, I understand this is a gross oversimplification that doesn't account for FEA-driven structural geometry concerns and compromised crystalline structure at the point of deformation. Just bear with me for a moment.

    Since nature is lazy and attacks things at their weak points, I figured it would be sensible to reduce the likelihood of these weak points forming in the first place. Polyurea (the chemical used for Line-X) is pretty resilient stuff, and can stand up to repeated impacts and abrasion well. Despite its drawbacks - specifically its lack of flexibility - I think it was the best choice for my intended end state. Worst case scenario, I have an unnecessary protective measure to add to my list of paranoia-driven modding: XPEL headlight film, vinyl wrapped roof, about a gallon of Fluid Film, etc.

    In order to reduce the severity of my bill from Line-X, I pulled everything out of my bed myself. I didn't realize how much crap I had accumulated in there:

    EC4B5CA8-58B1-4485-A638-2A4EE0D3A027.jpg

    Naked beds are weird-looking:

    0779F22B-E123-407C-90B1-2AD547EEEA1C.jpg

    I left these bolts (and the accompanying tonneau rails) in place because I couldn't wedge a socket in there to take them out. I asked @EatSleepTacos to have a look, and I'm damn glad he did. I had no idea that they secured the bedsides to the truck. That could've been a sh!tty drive to work:

    094CB1CA-B536-4C3D-8EBE-4352A4C53136.jpg

    As you can see, I also left my Total Chaos bed stiffeners in place. The tolerances on the bolt holes are very tight, so removing them and adding about 1/8" of Line-X to the bed would've made reinstallation damn near impossible.

    I dropped my truck off at Line-X of Virginia Beach on a Thursday afternoon. I talked with the guy behind the counter and explained that I wanted him to spray over my bed stiffeners, which garnered me a weird look. After a bit of explanation about the tolerance issue, he said he'd do his best.

    A84E1743-578B-4364-9EA3-93839F7D9429.jpg

    His best is pretty damn good, in my opinion. I couldn't find a flaw anywhere, and I spent a good 10 minutes inspecting his work.

    While I had the bed stripped down, I figured I'd take the opportunity to get some more stuff installed:

    @mattgecko LED strips under both cargo rails, inside the lid of my toolbox, and under my hood. I haven't done any electrical connections yet; that will be on hold until @Puppypunter gets a chance to spec out and build a power center, which will drive all my auxiliary electronics.

    C8E8DE4C-7DC9-42C7-9264-1133C7FF47D8.jpg
    3B3C780F-BC7C-4232-969C-E4DAFC99242D.jpg
    5416E570-AE3E-44BF-A3BA-3C4098034E37.jpg

    I attempted to install my ARB twin compressor in an Expedition Essentials bedside compressor mount, with mixed success. The preliminary work went okay, more-or-less, including cutting the rib off the backside of the bed:

    EA68F933-8CCA-43A9-9F84-7027F9EC3E59.jpg
    CC7411D2-9C4F-478D-85A8-2DC7BD236A90.jpg

    ... drilling the holes in the bed (slightly oversized due to Line-X application afterwards):

    967491B1-ADE3-47C8-B028-BC3379F1201C.jpg

    ... and modifying the bedside cubby in accordance with the provided instructions:

    093A7C57-6C9A-45F8-840F-62853D1D1606.jpg

    I did run into some serious issues when it came time to install. It looks like the holes I drilled in the bed weren't spaced out far enough, despite my repeated checks to make sure the template was indeed stretched taut before drilling. I broke out the Dremel to try and make the slots deeper, which seemed to work... up until I broke 2 of the 6 bolts when trying to thread them in:

    2B15E534-4A98-4156-8524-4620441DC96B.jpg

    Apparently I didn't grind them deep enough. I now have to remove this whole assembly again to drill the broken bolts out, then drill the threaded inserts out, then through-bolt them with a nut on the back. I'm going to stop writing about this so I don't rage out again.

    In addition to the problem above, I was unable to fit the bedside cubby "faceplate" back over the compressor mount. The AC power outlet protrudes too far into the compressor mount, making reinstallation impossible. Expedition Essentials does make a part for this specific application, which I ordered yesterday:

    https://expeditionessentials.com/products/toyota-tacoma-bcm-power-outlet-adapter

    In the meantime, I cut the AC power outlet trim the same way I cut the cubby, leaving a 3/4" lip all around:

    A66728EC-9DA2-4253-92BE-419BE22FEEA8.jpg

    I discovered something interesting when hoisting the compressor and mount into place. I wasn't entirely sure that the EE compressor mount could be used with a high clearance bumper, so I rolled the dice. Turns out that it does fit, although the clearance between the compressor and Mobtown's frame brace tube is pretty tight at one end:

    F3B8A767-78A1-4E61-95A6-D20BDAFD72E5.jpg

    I do think it's kind of cool that the tube runs directly beneath the compressor, offering a sort of "backup" support in case the compressor mount fails. When I eventually reinstall the compressor mount with new hardware, I plan on padding the aforementioned frame brace tube with something to reduce the chance of metal-on-metal impact due to vibration and flexion.



    Completely unrelated to bed upgrades: I replaced my front camera because it was looking pretty rough after only a few months in service.

    98EDE811-5EB2-4AE7-810B-CEA58EC0B514.jpg

    It was functioning just fine, but I had my doubts about long-term water intrusion. I decided to completely redo it, using the following:

    New Natika WD-011 front camera
    48-53mm bull bar clamp
    Black stainless oversized clipped washer
    Stainless M8 acorn nut, with a slot cut in the side for cable passage
    Stainless zip tie mount (McMaster P/N 5253T64)
    Stainless M6 tamper-resistant Torx screws
    An embarrassing amount of RTV sealant

    0F145D74-8550-4C2B-9291-AD08490443D8.jpg
    CD0A9269-013C-416C-B986-D3593C866D3A.jpg

    The view is a little clearer than before, which is a nice added bonus:

    A17EDC86-ACC6-4808-8458-B65AFA3BF2F1.jpg

    As compared to the previous setup:

     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2021
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  9. Jun 19, 2021 at 4:36 PM
    #129
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    Does moving house count as a mod?

    2A22B3CC-0FD5-4B7F-8DA8-1B6806499E38.jpg

    I’ll be moving into a new place next week. One of the big selling points was the garage, which has been a want of mine since I got a vehicle worth caring about. Garages and regular maintenance are two easy ways to keep your vehicle happy.

    https://www.yourcarcave.com/do-garaged-cars-last-longer/

    Fitting the trail limo into this dinky garage is a challenge. Forward-to-aft clearance is… toight.

    5D5EFF28-3146-454A-97A6-04F3EA8AA826.jpg
    9883C9FE-E202-4467-AE5E-9157D80784FE.jpg

    The close quarters will require a little extra caution when parking, but the long-term benefits will be worth it.
     
  10. Jun 19, 2021 at 10:22 PM
    #130
    Taco-Obsessed

    Taco-Obsessed Wildlife Peeping Tom

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    Never ending
    Looking for something like this. Can you explain why it would not fit without the wood spacers? Below and to the sides?
     
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  11. Jun 20, 2021 at 3:10 AM
    #131
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    The lid requires a little clearance at the hinge to open; mounting the toolbox flush against a wall won't work. I had to add 2x4s (used as spacers) to the back face of the toolbox, where it mates up to the front of the bed.

    Unfortunately, the wood spacers on the back face pushed the toolbox a little too far rearward, resulting in the lower corners of the protruding "shelf" digging into the wheel wells. I added a bit of height to the toolbox to introduce some standoff.

    So, in short: add a 2x4 across the back face of the toolbox, and two 2x4s underneath the toolbox. After that, you should be good to go.

    Side-to-side clearance is fairly forgiving. There's enough space for me to keep a couple large tools in cargo rail mounts between the toolbox and the sides of the bed, which is great for maximizing utility space by keeping everything tucked up tight at the front of the bed.
     
  12. Jul 10, 2021 at 1:54 PM
    #132
    ardrummer292

    ardrummer292 [OP] Resisting G.A.S.

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    Overbuilt daily driver
    As I get closer to the projected end of my build, peculiar things have started to pop up on my shopping list. Recovery gear, while not an oddity for most offroading TW folk, is definitely an odd accessory for someone who rarely leaves pavement.

    I used to carry an ancient, neglected tow strap in my old F150. The webbing was stiff and half the stitching was blown out, but it served its purpose the handful of times I needed to pull someone out of a snowdrift or muddy field. Since I'm now paying significantly more attention to my vehicle and its accessory complement, I figured it was time to retire the strap and get something a little nicer.

    I decided early in the build process that I wouldn't install a winch, despite the yawning cavity in the front of my ARB demanding to be utilized. It would be a heavy, expensive, power hungry, relatively failure-prone, and rarely used accessory that exceeds even my healthy appetite for overkill. Traction boards were another option I considered; while they're great for most types of adverse terrain, they aren't a very good choice when dealing with slick icy surfaces. That left only one realistic option: a recovery rope/strap.

    The one glaring downside of recovery ropes is that they require another vehicle to function. This is not the case with winches and traction boards, which are the obvious primary recovery tool options for the bold solo wheelers out there. For daily driver duties like mine, recovery ropes are perfectly adequate.

    My setup consists of the following:

    B9FF09A4-D263-4756-B06F-16340BBCF4C3.jpg
    516DEFFC-C4CF-476F-BF3E-8A4FB04B50BB.jpg
    727A0C83-A232-40EC-B347-0517339F1E3D.jpg

    Bubba Rope, 7/8" x 30 feet, P/N 176680
    4.75T 19mm ARB shackle, Type S/premium, P/N ARB2015
    3/8" Gator-Jaw soft shackle, P/N 176746NGRB, with chafe guards, P/N 176820CG
    Blue Ridge Overland Gear recovery strap bag/line dampener, P/N 21SB-1

    I went for the 7/8" diameter original Bubba Rope based on the calculations listed in the beginning of their FAQ section:
    https://www.bubbarope.com/frequently-asked-questions/
    Assuming I'm the stuck vehicle, multiplying my gross weight of 5500 lbs by 4 yields 22,000 lbs. The breaking strength of the 7/8" Bubba Rope is 28,600 lbs, so I have overshot manufacturer's recommendations by 30% (28,600 / 22,000 = 1.3). This isn't ideal for fully engaging the elastic properties of the rope, but it does allow me to safely attempt recovery of a vehicle heavier than my own.

    The 4.75 ton ARB shackle has a breaking strength of 56,000 lbs and is intended to be hooked onto any of the recovery points of my vehicle. That could be the bolt-on ARB recovery point up front, or either of the recovery points integrated into my Mobtown HC bumper in the rear.

    The 3/8" Gator-Jaw soft shackle has a breaking strength of 47,000 lbs and is intended for use on the other vehicle.

    The BROG recovery strap bag is a slick way to keep everything in one tidy, easy to deploy package. The rope never fully leaves the bag and can be packed with dirt or sand to function as a line dampener. I consider this an essential safety function, reducing the risk of injury or damage if the line separates. The only downside of this bag is the size; it's too small to fit the Bubba Rope in a daisy-chained configuration, which is my strong preference for ensuring tangle-free unspooling:

    https://www.animatedknots.com/chain-sinnet-knot

    There is a logic to the parts I selected. I want the recovery rope to break before anything else, since a line separation is fairly unlikely to cause extensive damage with the line dampener affixed; hence, its breaking strength is lowest. If that doesn't pan out, the soft shackle should be the next to fail; if it manages to make contact with my truck, it is a lot less likely to cause damage than a hard shackle. The last thing to fail, at nearly double the breaking strength of the rope itself, is the steel shackle. If this breaks, something has gone very wrong and someone is going to need some extensive repairs.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2021
  13. Jul 10, 2021 at 8:47 PM
    #133
    JMcFly

    JMcFly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2020
    Member:
    #337348
    Messages:
    655
    Vehicle:
    2012 Tacoma SR5 4x4
    Looking good!
     
    ardrummer292 [OP] likes this.

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