1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

A story on modifying...

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas' started by jcayce, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. jcayce

    jcayce [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Member:
    #18475
    Messages:
    477
    Gender:
    Male
    Texas
    Vehicle:
    09 TRD Offroad 4x4
    FJ TRD Rims, BFG AT 265/75/16, Fumoto Valve,
    ...from 1936.

    I just finished writing some curriculum for my AP ELA students for the first 9 weeks and am about to spend the afternoon finding a new home for the rear differential breather. I thought that I would include some of this morning's readings and implore fellow members to look up the entire article by E.B. White. Minus the vehicle in question, I feel that it has the best interests of the enthusiasts of this site in mind. It is queer to think that this mentality existed so long ago. Wish me luck.

    "There was this about a Model T; the purchaser never regarded his purchase as a complete, finished product. When you bought a Ford, you figured you had a start - a vibrant, spirited framework to which could be screwed an almost limitless assortment of decorative and functional hardware. Driving away from the agency, hugging the new wheel between your knees, you were already full of creative worry. A Ford was born naked as a baby, and a flourishing industry grew up out of correcting its rare deficiencies and combating its fascinating diseases. Those were the great days of lily-painting. I have been looking at some old Sears Roebuck catalogues, and they bring everything back so clear.

    First you bought a Ruby Safety Reflector for the rear, so that your posterior would glow in another car's brilliance. Then you invested thirty-nine cents in some radiator Moto Wings, a popular ornament which gave the Pegasus touch to the machine and did something godlike to the owner. For nine cents you bought a fan-belt guide to keep the belt from slipping off the pulley. You bought a radiator compound to stop leaks. This was as much a part of everybody's equipment as aspirin tablets are of a medicine cabinet. You bought special oil to stop chattering, a clamp-on dash light, a patching outfit, a tool box which you bolted on the running board, a sun visor, a steering-column brace to keep the column rigid, and a set of emergency containers for gas, oil and water - three thin, disc-like cans which reposed in a case on the running board during long, important journeys - red for gas, gray for water, green for oil. It was only a beginning. After the car was about a year old, steps were taken to check the alarming disintegration. (Model T was full of tumors, but they were benign.) A set of anti-rattlers (ninety-eight cents) was a popular panacea. You hooked them on to the gas and spark rods, to the brake pull rod, and to the steering-rod connections. Hood silencers, of black rubber, were applied to the fluttering hood. Shock absorbers and snubbers gave 'complete relaxation'. Some people bought rubber pedal pads, to fit over the standard metal pedals. (I didn't like these, I remember.) Persons of a suspicious or pugnacious turn of mind bought a rear-view mirror; but most Model T owners weren't worried by what was coming from behind because they would soon enough see it out in front. They rode in a state of cheerful catalepsy. Quite a large mutinous clique among Ford owners went over to a foot accelerator (you could buy one and screw it to the floor board), but there was a certain madness in these people, because the Model T, just as she stood, had a choice of three foot pedals to push, and there were plenty of moments when both feet were occupied in the routine performance of duty and when the only way to speed up the engine was with the hand throttle.

    Gadget bred gadget. Owners not only bought ready-made gadgets, they invented gadgets to meet special needs. I myself drove my car directly from the agency to the blacksmith's, and had the smith affix two enormous iron brackets to the port running board to support an army trunk.

    People who owned closed models builded along different lines: they bought ball grip handles for opening doors, window anti-rattlers, and de-luxe flower vases of the cut-glass anti-splash type. People with delicate sensibilities garnished their car with a device called the Donna Lee Automobile Disseminator - a porous vase guaranteed, according to Sears, to fill the car with la faint clean odor of lavender'. The gap between open cars and closed cars was not as great then as it is now: for $11.95, Sears Roebuck converted your touring car into a sedan and you went forth renewed. One agreeable quality of the old Fords was that they had no bumpers, and their fenders softened and wilted with the years and permitted the driver to squeeze in and out of tight places."
     
  2. jcayce

    jcayce [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Member:
    #18475
    Messages:
    477
    Gender:
    Male
    Texas
    Vehicle:
    09 TRD Offroad 4x4
    FJ TRD Rims, BFG AT 265/75/16, Fumoto Valve,
    Forgot the title for those who are interested and looking for an afternoon read:
    'Farewell, My Lovely!' by E.B. White. Originally published in 'The New Yorker' circa 1936. And I know that the article and newspaper should be italicized, this damn iPad will not let me do it though. And yes, you can start a sentence with 'and' and still follow all the constraints of proper grammar.
     
  3. rleeharris

    rleeharris "Old Timer," compliments of 11Taco2.7

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
    Member:
    #49326
    Messages:
    1,255
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Bob
    San Antonio, Texas
    Vehicle:
    '11 Tundra Crew Max TRD Off Road
    So that's how this mod'ing started? Thanks for sharing.
     
To Top