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AdventureTaco - turbodb's build and adventures

Discussion in '1st Gen. Builds (1995-2004)' started by turbodb, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. May 16, 2019 at 9:05 AM
    #2301
    Y2kbaja

    Y2kbaja Well-Known Member

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    If you're like me every time I read a location or hot spring or road or town I'll go to my google map and make a waypoint. I use google drive > google my maps and have different maps for each past and future trip.
     
    turbodb [OP] and Goran like this.
  2. May 16, 2019 at 10:41 AM
    #2302
    CowboyTaco

    CowboyTaco $20 is $20

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    I'm guessing it happened yesterday or possibly the day before. I could smell - what I believe to be - the grease burning on the hot exhaust as I was driving this morning. I was also messing with trucks over the past weekend (though not my truck), so I think I would have noticed it then. It caught my eye as soon as I walked past the front passenger side wheel.
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.
  3. May 16, 2019 at 11:02 AM
    #2303
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

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    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Shit dude. I've gone a few years on torn boots with multiple trips. You'll be fine. Don't sweat it.
     
  4. May 16, 2019 at 11:08 AM
    #2304
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Alvord Desert 3 - Gun-Shy, We Head to Hart Mountain
    April 27, 2019.

    The wind that had been relentless the day before died down over the next several hours, resulting in the most pleasant night of the trip. Oriented just so, there was no need to get up in the morning to enjoy the sunrise either - something I'm sure I'll forget by the next time we go out.

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    A full day ahead, we didn't linger long under the covers, both of us out of the tent by 6:30am - our long shadows playing across the playa, Steens Mountain towering to our west - so we could get breakfast eaten and the tent stowed by our planned departure time of 7:00am. After-all, we had 100 miles of dirt ahead of us...assuming we didn't get turned around somewhere along the route.

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    It was actually 7:15am by the time I finished taking photos and lollygagging on my tent-packing chores, and as we pulled off the Playa for the last time, we bid it farewell - the three nights we'd spent in the same place an anomaly for us, though one we'd enjoyed.

    Our route today would take us first south to Fields - for more fuel - and then west to Hart Mountain National Antelope Wildlife Refuge, our last stop on this 5 day trip. But first, as we headed south, we couldn't resist the pull of a purple blanket that unfolded along the side of the road.

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    As it turned out, we had plenty of time - as we arrived in Fields for fuel, the crowd outside Fields Station was indicative of the 8:00am opening - five minutes after we pulled in. Guess I should have noticed that when we were there the day before. Sharp, ehh? :rofl:

    Luckily we didn't have long to wait before topping off the tank and having a quick chat with some of the locals. Curious if we'd even be able to make it over the first pass, we were relieved to find out that not only was Domingo Pass open, but it was apparently "mostly dry" and "even drier on the west side."

    Well, at least we knew that the first 15% of our route was open. We headed out. :fingerscrossed:

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    As we'd heard, the road was in reasonably good condition as we wound our way up Domingo Pass. A bit of water on the road here, a bit of snow on the hillside there, we completed the 2500' climb quickly - stopping only a few times to take in the expansive views and amazingly green lichen growing on the rocks near the summit.

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    From the top, the view was vast! The book that @mrs.turbodb had been reading talked about the Desert Trail (like the Pacific Crest Trail - PCT) that passed through these parts, where you could see for 50 miles in every direction. And that was no joke.

    Only problem was, the views were a bit...monotonous. Green (right now) rolling hills as far as the eye could see.

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    It was right around here that I realized how - umm - how to put this... how crazy this plan was. I mean, really crazy. This wasn't like yesterday where we were eight miles from a ranch and three miles from the Alvord Playa if something went wrong. We could easily be 50 miles from the nearest help - two full days of hiking in the hot sun. Much more remote than even the OBDR trip that we did solo a couple of years ago.

    Man, I must be getting old if I'm thinking about these things.

    Anyway, we'd had cell service for most of the trip, but lost it on the way up Domingo Pass and I was sure that it'd be spotty as we headed into the nowhere of Oregon™. Here at the top though, the LTE was strong and I quickly whipped up an email to Pops that explained the crazy thing we were doing, and how long we expected it to take. And, since we were on roads that may or may not actually have existed, I sent along a GPS track as well.

    I just hoped he knew how to open it! :pc-coffee:

    With that, we set off down the back side of the pass towards our next trail - Juniper Spring.

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    As was the case with most of the roads we'd been on this trip, it was clear that we were on a road that one would be generous to say was lightly traveled. My guess is that we were the first to drive it this year for sure, and that annual traffic could likely be counted on my fingers.

    Elevation dropping as quickly as we'd climbed, we came to a rock outcropping that bore the remains of some long-forgotten rancher - a barb-wire rock one of the last remaining vestiges of human habitation. An anchor of some sort? Perhaps just a rancher with a weird sense of humor? A rock that tried to get away?

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    We soldiered on, making good time and leaving a trail of dust in our wake - the truck working fabulously at this point, taking us further and further into nowhere-ness. And then, water on the road.

    But it wasn't bad - it was just a trickle really - a spring out here in the wilderness. And then I saw it - a singleton Juniper. I looked to my left and smiled. "We've reached Juniper Spring!" I announced smartly. And then, I wondered aloud, "What happens when the Juniper dies? Does it just become 'No Juniper spring'?" Dork.

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    From there, we covered a lot of ground - the remainder of Juniper Spring road, Ackley Camp Road, and half of Buckaroo Pass - all the while our eyes glued to the mountains ahead, the snow along their peaks causing us to wonder: could we make it?

    Things were going well - the sun was warm, the air was sweet with spring, and the roads varied from good to great for covering ground. And it was reasonably dry - that is, until we reached a cattle reservoir that apparently was seasonal. I say apparently because the road drove right through the middle of the reservoir, and we weren't talking a few inches - we were talking a few feet. There was no way that we could make it work - and looking at the map, there was no immediately obvious re-route.

    I got out and scouted the situation. It appeared that we could skirt the reservoir along it's lower edge - by driving over the dam - if we could make it onto the dam itself. See, the part of the dam nearest us had washed out.

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    Gun-shy from our experience the day before, I put on my Muck boots to see just how sketchy this was going to be.

    To my surprise and relief, it was immediately obvious that the rockier soil here was going to provide plenty of support for the truck, as long as we stayed out of the reservoir proper. It took a bit of convincing, but eventually @mrs.turbodb also agreed that we might as well give it a try, and down we went. And up.

    We'd done it! Looking back, it wasn't really that big a deal, but to us at the time - it was like getting back on your bike after falling off.

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    As we pulled away, smiles and "I can guarantee we're the first and only ones on the road this year" all around - in front of us, a beautiful pair of wild horses were doing the same thing we were - wandering around, looking for adventure. Curious about the world, they'd walk slowly towards us, then get spooked and canter away for a bit. Then mosey our way before galloping off to a safe distance. Downwind, we turned off the truck and watched for a bit, enjoying the curiosity we knew so well ourselves.

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    Eventually though, we knew we had to keep going - it was near lunch time and while we'd covered a lot of miles, we had no idea what was ahead. If we had to turn back now, we'd have a lot of "return" miles to cover before nightfall, the next day already fully accounted for by our drive home.

    Another hour or so and we'd ticked off another 25 miles - we were now nearing Beatty's Butte and ultimately Flook Lake Road, the road that would take us into the Hart Mountain Refuge - and we decided that this was as good a place as any to enjoy the last of our lunch meat, chips, and apples. So, I got our chairs set up in the shade and @mrs.turbodb assembled sandwiches, and then we relaxed.

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    In even better spirits after filling our bellies, we once again sped off down the road - our confidence growing with every passing mile. Nearly 75 of those miles were behind us now, with another 25 to our final destination. As we sped along, we noticed a - shall we say interesting - dwelling (?) set back from the road. I mean, it was decked out with an exercise bike, a propane grill, and more - so it was clearly something that was occupied...but by who? And were they supposed to be there?

    We were cool not finding out. I snapped a quick photo and carried on. As one does.

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    It was right around this point that we started getting cocky. Counting our chickens before they'd hatched. Birds in the bush. You know, that kind of thing. So it shouldn't be any sort of surprise that it wasn't long before we rounded a corner to find exactly what we'd been dreading for all these 85 miles...

    Just like yesterday, a relatively shallow river that crossed the road. The red, dusty, not-very-rocky-at-this-point road.

    [​IMG]

    It was Muck boot time, again. And this time - unlike the reservoir earlier in the day - it was less-obvious what the right answer was. It seemed to me that the bank was a muddy mess, but that once we got into the middle of the crossing, the traction wasn't bad. With nothing to winch off of, and only a wacko-in-a-shanty to ask for help, we probably should have turned back.

    "We're going for it." I announced. "We can't be scared of all water crossings forever."

    Famous last words... but not this time - we laid a few sage over the worse of the mud at the entrance to the crossing and locked all the lockers - and then walked the truck through like it was nothing. Whew.

    Flush again with success, we quickly stumbled upon a bug-out shelter less than a mile up the road near Beatty's Butte. Constructed in 2008, this thing was insane - truly a zombie-apocalypse-style get-away, with concrete walls over 24" thick, and steel window and door coverings that weren't just locked, the locks were encased in boxes that had been welded over them - a cutting disk required to gain access.

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    A bit spooked, and also bummed that we couldn't check out the interior, we didn't spend long at the Oregon Zombie Defense site - instead pushing on towards our ultimate goal. We were soon rewarded by a sign that we didn't know existed, but that was a relief to us both.

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    We'd entered the refuge, and we were officially on Flook Lake Road. And - best of all - the "Road Closed" sign that we passed just a couple hundred feet further along was folded in half - the road was open!

    That, or no one had ever come this way to close it at the end of the season last year. I joked to @mrs.turbodb that it would be funny if the the road went right through Flook Lake, but she pretty quickly set me straight by telling me that, "Flook Lake is over here." as she pointed at the map to show me how wrong I was.

    ...which I was OK with in this case, obviously. :rofl:

    The last few miles passed quickly at this point - we could taste victory. @mrs.turbodb even looked over and said, "Well, it was nice that one of the routes worked out!" And then we crested the last rise.

    In front of us - we could clearly see - Flook Lake. And not just Flook Lake - we could also see our road disappear directly into the middle of the lake.

    Flook me you flooking lake! :annoyed_gaah: :angrygirl:

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    We had two miles to go, and I turned to my right, "We're going to seriously consider driving across the tundra if there's no way around." i said. And I was serious.

    Luckily for us, there was a faint way around - not to skirt the lake, I think - instead it was a route to some nearby petroglyphs that we didn't know about, unfortunately. But we didn't care - as one mile, then a mile-and-a-half, then nearly two miles ticked off, we realized we were going to make it.

    And we'd done it in great time - it was not even 3:30pm and in front of us was Hart Mountain. Victory was ours! Sure, it was a route that we wouldn't have given a second thought to later in the year, but today - today we were heroes.

    Even if it was just each others heroes.

    [​IMG]

    A quick stop at the visitor center to use the flush toilet, and we decided that rather than go straight to the hot springs and campground, we'd first go check out Petroglyph Lake. We'd done enough research before heading out to know that the road to the lake was closed, but at only 2 miles each way, we figured it would be a good way to stretch our legs after a long day in the truck.

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    By the time we got to the lake, the joke I'd made at the trailhead of just driving around the flimsy gate was something we both wished we'd done - the road was boring and totally passable, likely closed simply because no one had checked it. Of course, we'd never have driven around the gate but it was fun to talk about doing it!

    But what we were here for were the petroglyphs. Covering a quarter-mile long wall along the north edge of the lake, there are dozens of images etched into the rocks, and we had a great time discovering one after another.

    The first few were reasonably basic.

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    But then things started to get more interesting. This dude was perhaps diving into the water? Or just really liked headstands?

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    And then, near the end, the coolest of them all - I thought. Bug-head-man, and his buddies. Or were they? Maybe they were his snack...running away. ::

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    Our curiosity satisfied, we returned to the truck and decided that before heading to the hot springs, we'd air up - we'd be heading out on reasonably maintained roads early the next morning and airing up away from the springs would be nicer for everyone trying to enjoy their quiet solitude.

    That task completed, we were only minutes from camp, which we found a mere 50 feet from the hot spring - the campground basically empty on a Saturday night (to our surprise and delight).

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    Our dip in the hot spring was great - just what was needed after a long day on the road - even if it was a little slimy for our tastes. Definitely cool though to be in a natural spring that's bubbling up around you and just the right depth to stand in, up to your neck.

    Oh, and as the only ones there, we could enjoy it in our favorite suits of all - birthday suits!

    Our soak complete, dinner was the next thing on our minds - lamb stew for me and some sort of rice pilaf thing for @mrs.turbodb - which we enjoyed as the sun set overhead, a purple hue tinting the sky above camp.

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    We called it a night shortly after - the sky still light as we climbed into the tent to read our books. I probably lasted a good 7 minutes or so before dozing off, @mrs.turbodb not much longer than that.

    It had been a great day - a successful day - but just barely. Perhaps the best kind.

    - - - - -​

    April 28, 2019.

    It was a cold night. 24°F when I awoke around 5:00am for sunrise. Having "thought ahead" and only brought a sweatshirt in the "sleeves" department, I put on every piece of clothing I could find - including @mrs.turbodb's jacket and gloves - and headed up the road and out of the campground to get a view of the horizon. I was just in time, the gentle wedge of Steens Mountain just poking up through the orange.

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    The tent still covered in ice, we put it away without breakfast, our plan to survive only on the meagerest of granola bars and apples until we could have an early lunch on the road. OK, that's not true - the Cherry and Dark Chocolate bars are amazing and who doesn't love a good Fuji apple?

    We were out of the hot springs campground by 6:30am - our earliest morning by far, and a good time to catch it in the morning light.

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    Headed west and north, we almost immediately hit the aptly named Lake County, and then, we were out of the refuge.

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    All that remained was highway. We'd survived another adventure, and had a great time doing it.



    You. Should. Too. :wink:
     
    SIZZLE, mtbkr, 2JHilux and 14 others like this.
  5. May 16, 2019 at 1:16 PM
    #2305
    CowboyTaco

    CowboyTaco $20 is $20

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    Traction mats might have helped you through Flook lake :p
     
  6. May 16, 2019 at 1:54 PM
    #2306
    austinmtb

    austinmtb Well-Known Member

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    Great trip report, I really enjoyed reading it.

    I was out there at the end of March and took that same route from Whitehorse ranch rd to little sand gap. Unfortunately after getting to the playa I realized I could have linked it into big sand gap, but I guess that can be for another trip. The spot you got stuck at looked about the same in March. I ended up driving into the sage brush and finding a way to cross at a narrower section of water. Not far down the road, the creek diverted from the road and it was free sailing from there.

    05B68D14-79FD-4A8E-BF14-BFA0AB979924.jpg

    Looks like we took damn near identical pictures at the borax sign.

    15C800F0-A11F-4A9E-98D3-0906C01D1B1E.jpg

    If you ever go back out there I highly recommend checking out the WW2 plane crash in the hills above Denio.
     
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  7. May 16, 2019 at 2:28 PM
    #2307
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    No doubt.

    ...But I had alternatives and redundancies already - inflatable side floats, an extra length of winch line, an outboard motor, and a mermaid just in case. So I don't need no stinking traction mats. :p :rofl:

    Very cool. We saw the (more main) road to Little Sand Gap and considered taking it after we got turned around at Big Sand Gap, but decided we were done for the day and assumed it'd be just as sketchy since it crosses the same plateau!

    Thanks for the plane crash tip - I'll have to look that up and make a note for next time. Would be our second (though very different obviously) crash in the area!

     
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  8. May 16, 2019 at 3:34 PM
    #2308
    Area51Runner

    Area51Runner Well-Known Member

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    I'm starting to think we need to start a crowdfunding campaign for a pair of traction mats... just to force you to take them and find a spot on the rig :rofl:
     
  9. May 16, 2019 at 6:03 PM
    #2309
    2Toyotas

    2Toyotas Vintage Camp Stove Collector

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    @turbodb Did you identify the snake?
     
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  10. May 16, 2019 at 6:27 PM
    #2310
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    :p Hahahahaha, if it's crowdfunded, I probably don't need to start looking for a place to stash them any time soon!

    Just a gopher / bull snake, I'm pretty sure. Definitely hissed like one. Enjoying the warmth of the asphalt.
     
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  11. May 17, 2019 at 5:02 AM
    #2311
    BossFoss

    BossFoss Super Dope Homeboy from the Old Town

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    Rock with barbed wire is called a Deadman, used to anchor fencelines. Usually they are buried for extra strength, hence the name.
     
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  12. May 17, 2019 at 8:25 AM
    #2312
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Rig Review: Alvord Desert - What worked and what didn't?
    April 29, 2019.

    The trip to the Alvord Desert and Hart Mountain Antelope National Wildlife Refuge was one that we threw together relatively quickly and without much work on the truck after the previous trip. The only work really was maintenance - an oil change, tire rotation, and re-booting the passenger CV axle. That said, as the trip progressed, there were still several items worth noting.

    ADS Coilovers - Pre-Load Removed
    TL;DR - I recommend running front suspension with as little pre-load as possible. Having removed about a third of the pre-load from my ADS setup for this trip, the ride was much better and the suspension felt like it was able to work in situations where it was previously hitting full-droop.

    On the Utah trip (as well as Anza-Borrego), I'd noticed that my new front suspension from ADS didn't seem quite right. When I'd go over the back side of a bump and the wheel had to travel down to meet the lower ground, I was frequently getting a "clunk" sound that I'd previously not heard (with the Toytec BOSS setup). On talking to Monte (who got the same setup a few months after I did), he mentioned that he too heard the clunk now sometimes - but not nearly as much as I was hearing it.

    The only difference as far as I could tell was that he'd removed some pre-load from his springs.

    Keen to stop the bump and get a bit smoother ride, I took the opportunity to use the Branick spring compressor to remove approximately one-third of the pre-load from my coilovers (about ¾" of front lift). Needless to say it was satisfying to be able to turn the collar on the shock body without any punch or pry bar, all of the spring tension held in check by the compressor.

    And, removing that tension seems to have fixed most of the clunking I was hearing. Where previously I got on the order of 10-15 clunks/day even when I was being careful, on this trip I was less careful and still got no more than 1 clunk each day.

    [​IMG]

    Re-booted CV Axles with OEM Boots (new)
    The CVs performed flawlessly on this trip - something I was a little concerned abouts given my surprise when rebooting the passenger side. The boots - as expected from an OEM kit (04438-04021) - are holding up well, and the Moog Universal CV boot clamps that I got for the inner joint are holding just fine. I expect these boots to last for many years, especially since I've taken some of the pre-load out of the ADS coilovers.

    [​IMG]

    Miscellaneous Great Stuff
    I think I often overlook the little stuff that I take on trips that just does it's job, or that may not be used every trip, but is really handy when the time comes. A few of those things saved the day this time and I think it's worth highlighting their value:
    1. Full-Size Shovel - I think most folks recommend taking a shovel, but often it's of the folding variety, or a short shovel to save on space. The full-size shovel this time really saved our bacon when we got stuck in the mud, and that's the third time it's gotten us out of a "sticky" situation - it also happened on the OBDR and in Montana last year. Digging with a full-size shovel is so much more efficient, and you have so much more leverage, it really reinforces for me the value of this simple tool.
    2. Muck Boots - I've only had my Arctic Sport Muck Boots for a few trips now, but the peace of mind they allow when you're in a muddy, snowy, or wet situation is totally worth their reasonably-expensive price tag. In the past, I'd be hesitant to get out and walk a water crossing because it would mean getting my shoes wet or going barefoot (which means cold, drying off, and risky footing). Same for muddy situations - I wouldn't want to get my one pair of shoes all nasty just to scout a short length of trail. Muck boots change all that and they allowed me to spend half an hour digging out the truck in over a foot of mud without giving it a second thought. Big thumbs-up from me.

      [​IMG]
    3. Differential Lockers - This may seem strange, but I feel like lockers are something that people just don't like to talk about or acknowledge. Those that don't have them boast about how great they are because they don't need them; those that do have them hesitate to use them (or admit they used them) even though we all paid a pretty penny to get them. On this trip, my ability to lock both the front and rear axles is a big part of what allowed me to get the truck unstuck from the mud. Nearly all the traction was on the passenger side, and without lockers I would have simply dug myself further and further into the mud. I may not use them often, but like the Muck boots and shovel, even at several hundred bucks, the lockers paid for themselves (or paid for my mistake) by avoiding an expensive tow truck.

      [​IMG]
    Recovery Tracks - Something to Consider in the Future (?)
    I've avoiding getting any type of recovery traction device - like MaxTrax or TRED PRO - because they're super expensive and because I feel like any time I'd use them, they'd be so disgustingly dirty that I wouldn't know what to do with them.

    Both of those things would have been true on this trip as well - using a traction board may have even resulted in the board being buried and unrecoverable due to mud suction - but I think they may have gone a long way to helping me get out of the situation I was in, more easily.

    So then, the question becomes - are they worth it? For me, I think the answer is still "not yet," but I'm more on the fence than I've been in the past.

    [​IMG]

    Unchanged / Still an issue from previous Rig Reviews
    There are some things that have been featured in Rig Reviews that are - as yet - unchanged from when I originally reviewed them. Rather than highlight those things again, I'll simply link to them here.
    1. The Swing-Out Table - as expected, it was unusable on this trip.
    2. The Electrical System - continues to have the limitations of a single battery system.
    3. The Ham Radio Antenna - continues to have the shortcoming mentioned.
    4. The Bed is Cracking - the crack isn't worsening (that I can tell) but still needs to be addressed.
    5. Front ADS Reservoirs Too Close to Tires - I've still got rubbing in sharp turns each direction.
    6. 4Runner Wheels - still silver, which doesn't look as good as the Bronze SCS Stealth6s.
     
  13. May 17, 2019 at 9:26 AM
    #2313
    Traegermaster

    Traegermaster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2016
    Member:
    #200391
    Messages:
    1,207
    Kamloops - BC
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD
    5100's/5160, Eibach coils, Icon leaf pack, SCS Ray10s
    Great trip report and photos!
    I picked up a Garmin In-reach at Christmas and got the most basic plan for those moments in the middle of nowhere and things are going bad.
    Here in BC its pretty easy to be out of cel service.
    Have you thought about picking one up or not something you want to spend your cash on?
     
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  14. May 17, 2019 at 10:30 AM
    #2314
    TenBeers

    TenBeers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Member:
    #18067
    Messages:
    4,286
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rich
    Bentonville, AR
    Vehicle:
    2018 TRD Pro Cavalry Blue
    CBI bed rack and sliders, CVT Mt. Bachelor, Uniden 520XL, WeatherTechs, TRD CAI, 1Up USA hitch rack, speaker upgrade, Total Chaos bed stiffeners
    Great reports as always. You've got me looking at muck boots now -- we've had a pretty wet spring and so far I haven't had to get out in deep mud, but I've driven through plenty that I would not have wanted to step in with good shoes on.

    On the spring thing, I think the rule is that if you have to use too much preload to get the right height, you probably need a stronger spring. Apparently lots of debate on the issue, and no rule for how much preload is too much. Sounds like you are finding the sweet spot for your dynamic ride height.
     
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  15. May 17, 2019 at 11:39 AM
    #2315
    m3bassman

    m3bassman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
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    #49376
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    Where do you store your muck boots?
     
  16. May 17, 2019 at 11:41 AM
    #2316
    JasonLee

    JasonLee Hello? I'm a truck.

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Member:
    #129454
    Messages:
    2,062
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jason
    Gold Hill, CO
    Vehicle:
    03 DC TRD 4x4
    OME suspension + Dakar AAL + 265/75R16 BFG KO2 + Snugtop XTR + Tundra brakes
    I've learned one thing from full-size trucks and that's to place them upside down stuffed between the cab and the bed.
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. May 17, 2019 at 11:50 AM
    #2317
    Joe_from_iowa

    Joe_from_iowa Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2015
    Member:
    #159784
    Messages:
    52
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Joe
    Vehicle:
    2001 Tacoma TRD
    That's how all the farmers around here carry them on their trucks.

     
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  18. May 17, 2019 at 12:13 PM
    #2318
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Member:
    #177696
    Messages:
    3,417
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tacoma Xcab 4x4 SR5 V6 TRD
    AdventureTaco
    Thanks! :thumbsup:

    I've considered a PED/EPIRB like device a few times, but haven't ever pulled the trigger. In general, I don't feel that my travels take me far enough away from help that I'll need one... Famous last words.

    One thing I did do last year was change cell networks from At&T to Verizon. Amazing difference. I feel like I've always got cell service now! Not sure if that's good or bad when you're trying to escape, but it's definitely a nice extra level of safety.

    Yeah, the preload I had previously was what ADS put on them from the shop - I didn't think to adjust them. I think they pump then up to the "Max" lift ... 3" or so, because most people want that look.

    I don't care about the look - actually, I like a bit less lift... So removing the preload was what I should have done at the beginning.

    Springs are 650s, so plenty of lift there for what I've got going on! :cheers:

    In the cab, behind the driver seat, on their sides, to fill the space in the foot well... Which is great keeps because it keeps other stuff from falling down in there. If they get dirty, I have a bag for them.

    Nice. Might try this when they get dirty. Would be a little worried about water in fast puddles... But otherwise, great! :thumbsup:
     
  19. May 17, 2019 at 12:38 PM
    #2319
    m3bassman

    m3bassman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
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    01 Tacoma
    Yeah that is how I store mine. Stay dry, doesn't take up space, and keeps the muck outside the cab. But Dan is a very clever guy so I was curious if he had drummed up something different :cheers:

    Thanks for the explanation. Bag is a good idea!
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.
  20. May 17, 2019 at 1:01 PM
    #2320
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Member:
    #48500
    Messages:
    74,189
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Monte
    Wyoming/St. Louis
    Vehicle:
    The Trifecta of Taco's
    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Mine go in the back seat standing up with the toes under the front seat. Couple of walmart type bags go on them to keep dirt of of shit if I have other stuff back there. Otherwise I have a floor mat back there anyways. (in Igor of course)

    Like them in the truck so I can put them on in the truck if needed. Have had to do that several times.
     
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