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AdventureTaco - turbodb's build and adventures

Discussion in '1st Gen. Builds (1995-2004)' started by turbodb, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. Jun 13, 2019 at 9:37 PM
    #2421
    Adude

    Adude Well-Known Member

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    Crosbys are stamped marked individually and allowed. Im in the same boat as him. Great trip man, did you do any fly fishing on the snake?
     
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  2. Jun 14, 2019 at 8:25 AM
    #2422
    Nimble9

    Nimble9 Keystone State Adventures

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    enough to have fun
    pretty much every time I read one of your posts, I feel the need to move out west.
     
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  3. Jun 14, 2019 at 8:32 AM
    #2423
    rdpoe

    rdpoe .

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    This
     
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  4. Jun 14, 2019 at 10:10 AM
    #2424
    Nimble9

    Nimble9 Keystone State Adventures

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  5. Jun 14, 2019 at 12:35 PM
    #2425
    Goran

    Goran Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, the big difference between import and domestic shackles are. Import they batch test, and domestic they individually test. A batch could be any where from 10-1000 at a time, so the chances of having 1 that is bad is pretty high, thus we don't see them used in lifting applications, like we do domestic.
    That being said, we sell a lot of import shackles to the off-road guys that come into my shop, a lot of them like it because they'd rather lose a $10 dollar shackle in the mud vs $30.
    All domestic "rigging" equipment has a 5:1 safety factor. Not sure what import has if any.
    As always love the trip report!
     
  6. Jun 14, 2019 at 12:38 PM
    #2426
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

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    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    I have the same one and have for like...6 years. The grill is cast iron, its not going to warp. Works super great. Really like having the grill and burner in one box.
     
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  7. Jun 14, 2019 at 12:47 PM
    #2427
    Nimble9

    Nimble9 Keystone State Adventures

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    well the updated version has an aluminum grate, and the reviews have been mixed at best lol

    Iupload_2019-6-14_15-46-58.jpg
     
  8. Jun 14, 2019 at 12:48 PM
    #2428
    Speedytech7

    Speedytech7 Toyota Cult Ombudsman

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    I done a mod or two
    That's kinda impressive, I have to assume they set something like cast iron on top cause aluminum is usually pretty good at dissipating that well before it can melt.
     
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  9. Jun 14, 2019 at 12:56 PM
    #2429
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

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    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Wow that is impressive.
     
  10. Jun 14, 2019 at 2:10 PM
    #2430
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. You know what they say on Kauai- "west side is the best side." True on the mainland too! hahahaha

    I do have one of those. Love it so far after making a couple minor mods. Couple rig reviews worth reading here:
    I've not run into any problem with the grill at all. Seems to still be cast iron to me - heavier than an aluminum grill that size would be for sure. But I haven't cut into it (or melted it, hahahaha, to verify!)

    Note: I started with the Coleman stove that was two burners (well, after I moved from a Weber Q100 grill), and I did not like the two burner version - we grill too much when we're out camping!

    Edit: just checked out the reviews and I wonder if there are some counterfeit versions of this grill coming into the market - it's at a price point where that could be a reasonable thing to do. Could explain the difference between my/Monte's experience, and others.

    Thanks for the info on clevis'. Are you saying that every domestic clevis is tested? Wouldn't testing it up to (at least near) it's limit stress it in such a way that you no longer really want to use it? (He says, not really knowing anything.)

    And glad you're enjoying the trip report - one more day coming soon!
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  11. Jun 14, 2019 at 2:31 PM
    #2431
    Goran

    Goran Well-Known Member

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    Before leaving the factory everything should be stress tested. The minimum breaking (5x) the working load is where stuff starts to really deform. I'd imagine that putting it to its "working" load limit shouldn't stress or deform the shackle, as its supposed to be there for normal everyday use without a problem. No one would want to buy a shackle to only use it once.
    to get further into this as my knowledge isn't infinite, i put a request into Crosby lift group, and i should hear back from them Monday. :thumbsup:
     
  12. Jun 14, 2019 at 5:37 PM
    #2432
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    AdventureTaco
    Hells Canyon Part 4 - Eureka Bar and a Miscalculation
    May 24, 2019.

    We once again slept well - the rushing river providing a nice white noise through the dry night. In a canyon, I knew there was no rush to get up for the sunrise, and it was late (for us) before we even considered pulling ourselves out of bed.

    [​IMG]

    One of the great things about this particular camp site was that it happened to be across the Imnaha River from a trailhead that had the potential to be quite amazing - a trail that followed the river downstream to its confluence with the Snake - the same confluence we'd been perched high above the day before, and the site of Eureka Bar! (More on that later.)

    [​IMG]

    With cloudy skies overhead, we decided it was in our best interest to set out as quickly as possible - hopefully avoiding the any rain. So a quick breakfast and camp tear-down ensued, and we crossed the Imnaha to the trailhead just after 8:15am.

    It was at that point that we were waylaid by the fishery folks who were back at the tent we'd investigated the night before - there to count how many fish they'd caught in their Archimedes-screw trap during the night. We chatted each other up for a few minutes - us curious about their operation; they curious how we even found this place - before setting off downstream.

    [​IMG]

    We knew from both the book that @mrs.turbodb had as well as the fishery guys that there was going to be poison ivy along the trail, but we didn't know how much or how overgrown it would be. What we did know was that it was a pleasant 72°F and the 9 mile hike was mostly flat, since it dropped only as far as the Imnaha River over its entire length.

    Almost immediately I was glad we'd decided to do this hike. Even if we hadn't had plenty of time, the canyon walls rising up around us were so stunning that it would have been a shame to miss it - it was, I think, my favorite experience in Hells Canyon.

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    Half-a-mile or so into the hike, we hit our first poison ivy. Fully leafed out, it was easy to identify - and there was plenty of it. Luckily for us, most of it - but not all - was off the side of the trail, and we did our best to avoid it. Only @mrs.turbodb got a bit of a rash - on her stomach somehow. :notsure:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We pushed forward at a steady pace, the trail in what I could only call great shape for its remoteness - something that we could thank a group of guys who'd come through a month or so earlier to cut back and spray the Himalayan blackberries that sometimes cover the trail.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As we reached the 2.8 mile mark, a large stone pillar on the other side of the river - and a geological marker on our side - let us know that we were on the right track. As if there was any option.

    [​IMG]

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    And here, as with the entire trail, tens- or hundreds-of-thousands of stacked rocks supported the trail next to the river, keeping it from washing out for over more than 100 years since it was originally built by the early settlers of Eureka Bar, at the confluence of the two rivers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Less than 90 minutes after we'd set out, we found ourselves at three wooden bridges that signaled - at least to us - the gateway to Eureka Bar. We'd spotted these bridges the previous day from our overlook of the confluence, and it was exciting to cross them - knowing that few people ever experience them from both vantage points.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And there in front of us - just beyond the last bridge - the confluence of the Imnaha and Snake Rivers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A confluence of two rivers this size is hard to capture from water level. With poison ivy covering the hillsides, and as a few rain drops started to fall, I quickly decided that the perfect shot was maybe not the most critical thing at this point in time - but we still wanted to explore Eureka Bar itself.

    A few mine shafts - most of them short, but a couple of them deep and one with train tracks leading in - were exciting finds, as was the foundation of the 7-story gold mill that dwarfed @ms.turbodb and had never even seen the millworks, much less crushed an ounce of material.

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    The rain starting to pick up a bit, we knew it was time to start heading back. With 4.5 miles or so to go, we hoped that the storm cell would pass, and that we'd dry off in the warm canyon breeze by the time we arrived back at the truck. And, if that was the case, we decided that we'd take advantage of it and eat lunch - something that sounded pretty good after a 9-mile hike.

    With @mrs.turbodb in the lead, we set off upstream, pausing only once to admire a deer hopping off through the poison ivy before reaching our destination.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Back at the truck, we changed out of our clothes - now dry with the storm cell having passed overhead, but probably covered in at least some poison ivy - and I assembled lunch for us to eat on the river's edge. Then, it was back to Imnaha, where we aired up before continuing on towards our next destination.

    [​IMG]

    This is the point where it's probably worth remembering that when we'd left Dug Bar the day before, the low fuel light had come on. That wasn't a big deal - we always carry 10 gallons of spare fuel, which I'd siphoned into the tank the previous evening - but it did mean that we were now running on the last of our fuel, and so needed to be judicious with its use.

    And so, as we headed out of town and onto what suggested itself to be a fun romp on Upper Imnaha Road, I was keeping a close eye on the fuel gauge.

    [​IMG]

    Upper Imnaha Road is a much more populus area it turned out than Lower Imnaha had been. That meant that it was reasonably well graded, but also that the additional traffic made for more potholes. Combined with the on-and-off rain showers, it was a muddy drive, but beautiful nonetheless - the mountains, clouds, and green grass surrounding us the entire way. And, as was the case with the confluence, we'd seen - and eaten lunch overlooking - Upper Imnaha Valley from Hat Point Road the day before, so it was neat to be able to get the lower-elevation perspective here as well.

    [​IMG]

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    An hour - and more miles than we'd expected - later, we arrived at the highway. It was here we had a decision to make. We both wanted to go to the Oxbow and Hell's Canyon Dams - towards the town of Halfway, but we didn't know if we'd find fuel that way - the only nearby fuel I'd marked on our map, in Joseph, OR.

    And we didn't have enough fuel to go first to the dams, and then back to Joseph - I estimated we were a gallon or so (15 miles) shy of that mark.

    [​IMG]

    And so it was that we made the decision to turn west - 38 miles and two not-officially-open-until-June-15th mountain passes to Joseph - to fill up with $70 or so of fuel before turning right back around and heading to Oxbow, a town on the Snake river, nearly to Halfway.

    It was a miscalculation that cost us a good two hours of daylight - both Halfway and Oxbow had fuel stations. A good reminder for me to mark stations in a much larger area than I might originally plan to visit - in case we finish everything a day earlier and cover additional cell-service-less ground.

    Live and learn. That is, if in my old age, I don't forget first! :rofl:

    On our way to Oxbow, early evening already upon us - we made a quick pit stop at Hells Canyon Overlook - because if you're this far away from home, why not? It was only just "meh" compared to what we'd experienced already, and so about 45 seconds later we were back on our way.

    [​IMG]

    Hells Canyon Dam - run by Idaho Power - is, it turns out, 23 miles north on a technically private road that leads only to the dam (and Visitor Center). Of course, it's paved and open to the public, so we putzed along, taking in the sights along the Snake River, here where it no longer rushed down the gorge, but meandered slowly in lake-like fashion.

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    It was nearly 7:00pm when we reached the dam, and as it turns out, our timing couldn't have been better. Having missed not only the busy time of day, we'd arrived well after everyone was gone - even the employees - and that afforded us the ability to take in the dam in a way that I think few get to experience.

    [​IMG]

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    The power of the water flowing through that dam is incredible. 330' high, so much water was rushing through the spillway while we were on the dam that the entire concrete structure was rumbling. I mean, feel-it-in-your-body-as-you-walk-along sort of rumbling. Is-this-thing-going-to-fall-apart sort of rumbling.

    It was awesome. Especially since it was a little scary. :biggrin:

    [​IMG]

    Eventually, @mrs.turbodb coaxed me off the dam and down to the Visitor Center, where we got three things:
    1. An even better view of the downstream side of the dam - very cool.
    2. A bunch of informational signs at the visitor center, which we both like to read - also cool.
    3. And a warning that "if horn sounds or dam breaks, seek high ground" - completely useless, given that high ground was only available on the other side of the dam.
    Thanks Idaho Power. :eek:

    [​IMG]

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    By now though, it was getting to be time to find camp, so we headed back the way we'd come and found a splendid little jut out into the lake-river where we could make camp, have dinner, and enjoy the last night of the trip. And where Idaho Power had erected a sign: "Danger Dam Ahead." As if you could somehow miss it, or drive a boat over it.

    [​IMG]

    Dinner was quick - some chicken-finger tacos with avocado salsa - a good thing™ because just after we finished cleaning up, it started raining. Light at first, we climbed into the truck to read a bit before getting in the tent, but the rain continued to fall.

    It eventually let up just enough that @mrs.turbodb decided to go to the bathroom, at which point the skies let loose a barrage of dime-sized drops that soaked everything in seconds, including anyone silly enough to have tried to squeeze in a bathroom break.

    It'd been another full day as we climbed into the tent, and with the rain continuing to fall on top of us, I hoped it'd let up by morning so we could dry everything out.

    - - - - -​

    We Head North to Another Adventure
    May 25, 2019.

    The morning did bring drier - if still a bit cloudy - skies, thankfully. Up at sunrise since we had an extra-early departure scheduled, it wasn't warm or breezy enough to dry everything out completely, but we did get the tent mostly dry before putting it away for the day.

    [​IMG]

    And then we were off - our destination not home, but another adventure. The one that we'd headed east for in the first place - a Memorial Day outing with old and new friends.

    ...but that's another story.
     
    Ret CB, SIZZLE, TaKoToy and 13 others like this.
  13. Jun 14, 2019 at 6:31 PM
    #2433
    FishinCrzy

    FishinCrzy A good day

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    That's great but...what's the fishing report? :bananadance:
     
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  14. Jun 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM
    #2434
    Dalandser

    Dalandser ¡Me Gustan Las Taco-mas!

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    Some of that canyon looks a lot like mountains out in the Mojave National Preserve, with foliage lol

    Nice trip!
     
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  15. Jun 15, 2019 at 7:29 PM
    #2435
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Well, on the Imnaha, the water level was at 90cm (they pull out the fish trap at 100cm) and most of the fingerlings have made their way downstream - they're only catching a few hundred a day now in the screw; at the height of the season, it's apparently many many 30-gallon garbage cans full.

    Yeah, sort of does. Makes sense I guess - it's also a desert! Was pretty cool to see it in spring when everything was green.
     
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  16. Jun 18, 2019 at 6:29 PM
    #2436
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Craig Mountain Part 1 - Lost!
    May 25, 2019.

    An astute reader may recall that we'd headed east a few days before Memorial Day - not just to explore Hells Canyon, but to meet up with Mike @Digiratus, Monte @Blackdawg, and Devin @MissBlackdawg. At least, those were the folks we knew; we were also rendezvousing with @BabyTaco Gage and his wife, and a couple of their friends - long overdue if you ask me.

    From our current location at Hells Canyon Dam, it was some 5 hours north to Lewiston, ID, where we'd all planned to meet for lunch, so we were up early - for sunrise if it'd been sunny and we'd been able to see the horizon - to eat a quick breakfast and do our best to dry off the tent from the torrential downpour the night before.

    [​IMG]

    We were on the road just before 6:00am, the skies clearing above us as we headed south - away from our destination - the 25 mile road to Hells Canyon Dam an in-and-out affair. That was fine by us - the sun streaming under the clouds illuminated the green hills, making the drive a pleasant one.

    [​IMG]

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    At Oxbow, we had a decision to make as to our route - we could retrace our steps west and north through Joseph, OR, or we could head further south, to an eastern route that would take us north through Idaho on highway 95. Having not been the Idaho route previously, we opted for that option - a nice side effect being that we could check out both the Oxbow and Brownlee Dams - two more of Idaho Power's controversial workhorses along the Snake River.

    Controversial because as the dams were being built, there was a struggle between the power company and US Fish and Wildlife around the transmission of spawning salmon upstream and small fry downstream around the dams - or at least, around the Oxbow Dam, the first to be built. Prior to its construction, the Snake River system was the worlds second largest producer of Chinook and steelhead, second only to Canada's Fraser River, with over 200,000 three- to four-foot long fish migrating up the river each year (and several million fingerlings migrating back down). Now, one may immediately think - "I know - a fish ladder!" - which would be a reasonable solution, but Idaho Power felt that was too expensive an option despite the fact that such a large percentage of the entire salmon population used this passageway to spawn, and instead opted for a trap system that would allow them to truck fish in both directions around the dam. This trap however, failed spectacularly - putting the entire structure of the dam in jeopardy - and after numerous attempts to fix the system, they gave up, effectively cutting off the Snake River above Oxbow - and eventually Hells Canyon Dam - from Chinook and steelhead spawning.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Beyond the dams, we turned north for a reasonably uneventful drive to Lewiston, through periods of rain so heavy we couldn't see more than 50' in front of us, and through fields of flowering canola so yellow they appeared to be painted. And, right on time, we pulled into our rendezvous point - KC Burgers - in the metropolis of Lewiston. We were the last to arrive.

    [​IMG]

    That's right, even Monte and Devin - notoriously late - had beaten us, a late drive the night before, and the one-hour time difference working in their favor. But no matter, we were together - at least for now - and enjoyed our burgers (though, I would try a different place next time - they were nothing special at KC in my opinion, and the service was meh).

    Lunch behind us, we discussed our next steps. Monte wanted to top of his fuel tank, we wanted to restock a bit at the grocery store, and Gage needed to swap vehicles. No problem we thought - we had the GPS track that Monte had created, and ham radios + APRS for locating each other - so we split up and agreed to meet on the mountain - likely somewhere on the trail to Eagle Creek, and camp.

    @mrs.turbodb and I - figuring that our detour would take the longest - provisioned as quickly as we could at the store and then pointed the truck towards Craig Mountain. We were likely 20-30 minutes behind everyone else, but we could see their APRS beacons heading out of town and so didn't give it a second thought.

    As we hit dirt, I wondered if the rest of the group had decided to air down - the road wasn't bad, but it's always a bit nicer to have those cushion-y pillows of air to make it easier on the rest of the suspension (and our bodies). Regardless, we pushed on - no more APRS beacons on the map, in an attempt to catch up.

    Maintaining a good clip, it wasn't long before we came to the turn for Eagle Creek - an offshoot from the main road; a road where airing down was a necessity. So, that's what we did - after all, this wouldn't cost us any more time than it'd cost the rest of the gang.

    [​IMG]

    Aired down, we bombed down Eagle Creek road trying to catch up. Every few minutes I'd try the ham radio to see if we could raise Mike or Monte - each time without success. And there were no APRS beacons - due to the mountainous terrain we assumed. But at our speed, we were sure that we'd catch them. Sure of it.

    Especially since we stopped only once for a quick photo; a feat that I've never accomplished when paired with Monte. :rofl:

    [​IMG]

    After paralleling the road for about 12 miles, Eagle Creek drains into the Salmon River - and we found ourselves at this point after passing several ATVs, UTVs, and dirt bikes, but without running into the rest of our group. Had we gone the wrong way? We were sure we hadn't - we were after-all, on the track.

    We took a few minutes here to try the ham radio again and snap a few photos - an old chimney in the middle of nowhere, and the calm - at this point - but full Salmon River floating by. "I'm sure that they're camped somewhere down by the river." I said to @mrs.turbodb.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    So, off we went again, our speed high - the ADS suspension getting a good workout, and performing flawlessly - the ride in the front much nicer after I'd removed some of the pre-load. It wouldn't be long now until we found them - we hoped! For another 8 miles or so, the road paralleled the Salmon River. The weather was warm - 80°F or so - and the beaches on its banks looked like inviting camp spots. But still, no group.

    [​IMG]

    Finally, having traveled some 20+ miles at speeds that surely would have caught us up, we decided it was time to turn back - we must have misheard where we were going to meet - they must have told us to meet them on the other track Monte had created, and so we decided it was time to give that one a try. A u-turn in the road where it turned away from the river, and we headed back at a reasonable speed - there was no need to rush now.

    [​IMG]

    By this time, it was 4:30pm in the afternoon and we found ourselves wondering what we'd do if we didn't find the crew along the other track - would we come back down to the river where it was super nice? Start our trip home early and head west? We didn't know, and suddenly as we turned off the Salmon and back onto Eagle Creek Road, it didn't matter - because over the ham radio we heard:

    "Got you loud and clear." I replied as we raced up the road. "So glad we found you guys!" replied Monte, "I figured we better come looking since we said we were going this way."

    Well, needless to say, it was a relief to know that we'd been going the correct direction - as opposed to going senile - and before long we met up with Monte and Devin who were in the process of making their way down Eagle Creek Road.

    [​IMG]

    Turns out that there'd been another camp site that Mike planned on staying at and it wasn't on either of the tracks that Monte had created. As they'd headed that way, a discussion ensued as to whether we'd be able to find them, and it was concluded that with ham radio and APRS, things would be just fine.

    And that boys and girls is a good example of why ham radios and APRS are not the end-all-be-all in communications. They are - for sure - much better than shorter range comms like CB, but in mountainous terrain, and even at 50W, they are quickly limited.

    Anyway, Monte and Devin had eventually decided that if we were going to find their camp, we would have - so we must have gone out the original route. Still early in the afternoon, and up for some exploration, they'd come looking. So we stood around and laughed about the situation for a while, talked a bit of trucks and mushrooms (it was after all the anniversary of last years mushroom hunt in Montana), and then pushed our suspension once again as we raced up Eagle Creek Road towards camp.

    An hour later, we pulled in to warm greetings and apologies for the re-route, and we took in the view from camp. It was cooler here - 60°F or so - and striking how different the surroundings were, some 4000' higher than at the Snake.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As Monte got the fire going, @mrs.turbodb explored the hillside, eventually calling me over. Still earlier in spring here, the wildflowers were in their full regalia - Indian Paintbrush of all different colors, and numerous other flowers covering the hillsides.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The evening was full of conversation around the campfire - we had, essentially, two groups coming together - a fun time to chat with old friends and get to know new people. Dinners were enjoyed (we had pesto pasta with chicken, fresh corn, and peas!) as we watched cell after storm cell pass to our west, the sun trying its hardest to eek out a meager sunset.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Eventually, one of those storm cells found its way to our camp. Luckily, most of us were about ready for bed at that point anyway - having started heading that direction to brush our teeth as the case may have been - but that didn't mean Monte couldn't give us a hard time for leaving the campfire early!

    We climbed into the tent and closed up the doors just as the rain picked up. As it'd been the previous night, it was a downpour - but this time it went on for quite a while. How long exactly I have no idea; I was asleep in minutes.
     
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  17. Jun 18, 2019 at 7:21 PM
    #2437
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

    Joined:
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    The Trifecta of Taco's
    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Ah reminds me I have most these photos edited.

    Fun times!
     
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  18. Jun 18, 2019 at 7:30 PM
    #2438
    Speedytech7

    Speedytech7 Toyota Cult Ombudsman

    Joined:
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    1993 Land Cruiser Triple Locked
    I done a mod or two
    I'll be excited to see them in a year or three :p
     
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  19. Jun 18, 2019 at 7:32 PM
    #2439
    PcBuilder14

    PcBuilder14 Well-Known Member

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    Brent
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    :rofl:
     
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  20. Jun 18, 2019 at 7:48 PM
    #2440
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

    Joined:
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    Male
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    Monte
    Wyoming/St. Louis
    Vehicle:
    The Trifecta of Taco's
    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Haha well that's what's funny. I took so few I just edited them. I'll upload them tonight.....maybe hahaha
     
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