1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

AdventureTaco - turbodb's build and adventures

Discussion in '1st Gen. Builds (1995-2004)' started by turbodb, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. Feb 8, 2019 at 7:05 PM
    #1841
    JasonLee

    JasonLee Hello? I'm a truck.

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Member:
    #129454
    Messages:
    2,347
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jason
    Gold Hill, CO
    Vehicle:
    03 DC TRD 4x4
    OME suspension + Dakar AAL + 255/75R17 BFG KO2 + Snugtop XTR + Tundra brakes
    What did the shackles look like when fully flexed out?

    ZZYXX: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/zzyzx-mineral-springs-and-healing-center
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articl...e-biggest-health-spa-scam-in-american-history
     
  2. Feb 9, 2019 at 9:55 AM
    #1842
    Ace115

    Ace115 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2016
    Member:
    #191086
    Messages:
    913
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Andrew
    Tucson AZ
    Vehicle:
    '03 DBL CAB 4X4
    I could swear that you recently posted a link to a very in depth post on removing the center pieces of the dash, but I cant locate it now. Did I remember that incorrectly?

    TIA
     
  3. Feb 9, 2019 at 10:02 AM
    #1843
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Member:
    #177696
    Messages:
    3,602
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tacoma Xcab 4x4 SR5 V6 TRD
    AdventureTaco
    Ahh, washout makes more sense. Should have thought of that. Glad everyone in your group was OK - could have been a bad situation :).

    :notsure: but I would assume they look about how they would look with OEM leafs since the Alcans I have are dang close the same length as the OEMs that I removed. Well, OEM leafs with a little bit taller bumps, since the ones in the photo are 4.25" instead of 2.5".

    [​IMG]

    I think someone else posted it recently, but here's a link to it. Might be one on TW too, but easier for me to find the blog, lol.

    https://adventuretaco.com/removing-the-dash-trim/
     
    Ace115 likes this.
  4. Feb 9, 2019 at 10:07 AM
    #1844
    Ace115

    Ace115 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2016
    Member:
    #191086
    Messages:
    913
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Andrew
    Tucson AZ
    Vehicle:
    '03 DBL CAB 4X4
    thank you! I appreciate this.
     
  5. Feb 9, 2019 at 2:35 PM
    #1845
    JasonLee

    JasonLee Hello? I'm a truck.

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Member:
    #129454
    Messages:
    2,347
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jason
    Gold Hill, CO
    Vehicle:
    03 DC TRD 4x4
    OME suspension + Dakar AAL + 255/75R17 BFG KO2 + Snugtop XTR + Tundra brakes
    FYI - @Ace115 I just took apart my dash yesterday and scanning through the linked post - it's all the same for our trucks except the climate control. Very similar - remove knobs and take a flat blade screwdriver to pry gently around the faceplate on the climate control and it will come off. Otherwise, all the screws/bolts are in the same places on our 2003 as in that truck.
    One thing that is missing is that there are two screws to remove the metal plate that the ashtray slides into (look up from the floor) and then ONE MORE screw pointing up holding the large black trim piece on (the one that goes around the radio, climate control and upper vents).
     
    Ace115 likes this.
  6. Feb 10, 2019 at 7:28 AM
    #1846
    christyle

    christyle 107

    Joined:
    May 16, 2017
    Member:
    #219225
    Messages:
    1,063
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Chino Hills, CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 DCSB TRD Off Road
    FOX 2.5 DSCs, RXT Leafs, armor
    I bought something like these awhile back and it makes me way less nervous working on my dash and trim.

    GLISTON 5pcs Auto Trim Removal Tool Car Pry Tool Kit, Door Panel Clip Removal Set for Vehicle Dash Radio Audio Installer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JVP1MRS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_GjeyCbHPFZJ5K
     
  7. Feb 10, 2019 at 7:42 AM
    #1847
    Ace115

    Ace115 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2016
    Member:
    #191086
    Messages:
    913
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Andrew
    Tucson AZ
    Vehicle:
    '03 DBL CAB 4X4
    Add in “use cation when removing climate control dials. Each has its own metal ring spacer thingy (approved technical term) that will either stay in the post hole or on the actual post. If missing the dials will not fit back on snug.”

    Looking back at the link and pics, my findings may be specific to the ‘01-‘04 models.
     
    Yetimetchkangmi likes this.
  8. Feb 11, 2019 at 8:34 AM
    #1848
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Member:
    #177696
    Messages:
    3,602
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tacoma Xcab 4x4 SR5 V6 TRD
    AdventureTaco
    Tacoma Rear Shock Relocation - Scrapping the First Attempt and Trying Again
    December 17, 2018.

    I'm generally pretty good at building things with my hands, but in relocating the rear shocks on my first gen Toyota Tacoma, I'd royally screwed up. If you haven't read about that, I'd recommend checking out the previous post in this series - Rear Shock Relocation - Fabrication and Failure, where after I'd permanently welded a bunch of stuff to my truck, I'd discovered that I couldn't go over bumps taller than about 2-inches. Not good for adventuring out on dirt roads.

    [​IMG]

    But, failure is a great learning tool, and I'd spent some time figuring out why what I'd done hadn't worked, and what the right way was to accomplish my goals... so it was time to give it another shot.

    Note: If you just want to understand the right way to do this and don't care about the story, the post you want to read is this one:
    How-To: Toyota Tacoma Rear Shock Relocation - Determining Leaf Spring Cycle and Mount Positioning

    Of course, having welded on the original shock mounts I'd purchased from RuffStuff.com, the only way they were coming off was by cutting and grinding, so my first step was to order a couple new sets of mounts. I got the same ones I'd purchased previously - RuffStuff SBRKT-175 (upper) and R1988-8 (lower) shock mounts.

    New parts acquired, it was time to figure out how to get the bed off the truck again - always a tedious process for me since I don't have a good place to store it, and since it requires a few strapping folks to lift free of the frame. Luckily, my 4Runner buddy Joe - who'd run the WABDR with us earlier in the summer - wanted some help installing a new roof rack and said I was welcome to use his "trellis hoist" to pull the bed off at the same time if I wanted.

    Of course, I wanted.

    So I headed over and maneuvered the truck under the trellis in his backyard. Joe uses this hoist to lift his RTT on/off his 4Runner so we hoped it had enough oomph for the Tacoma bed - I protected the cab and rear bumper with some moving blankets just in case it started to swing around.

    [​IMG]

    As we started lifting the bed, it was clear that the rear half was much heavier than the front. Removing the tailgate balanced it out almost perfectly and with the help of some pulleys and guidance up and over the fuel filler neck, the bed was soon suspended several feet above the frame.

    With rain in the forecast, it'd make a nice roof, assuming the rope held through work.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The first order of business was cutting off and grinding down the first attempt at the top mounts - the mounts quite clearly angled too far down.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then, I positioned and welded on the new mounts. Unlike the previous attempt, there was no measuring this time - I took @Squeaky Penguin's advice and mounted them as high as possible. In fact, I mounted them high enough that I had to grind just a little bit of the back of the mount off so it'd clear the bed. Every 1/8" counts!

    [​IMG]

    A quick measure at this point showed that I'd gained just over 2 inches of up-travel, previously the distance between mounts around 17 ¾".

    [​IMG]

    This was "close" to being good enough, but alas, once the mounts were re-painted and shocks were installed, the amount of exposed shaft (at rest) was exactly equal to the distance between the top of the bump stop and the frame - meaning the shock would bottom out before the bump stop could compress and absorb any impact. From talking to @Plastics Guy, I knew that the bumps would compress somewhere on the order of .4 - .7 inches depending on the impact, so I needed to either move the bumps up an inch or expose an additional inch of shock shaft to really feel comfortable.

    Since I already knew what the leaf springs would look like when "on the bumps" from our recent Mojave Road trip, I knew that raising the bump stops would be the wrong call - I'd be limiting my travel more than I needed to.

    [​IMG]

    That of course meant that the bottom mounts had to come off as well, and new ones installed, with the mount rotated down slightly - giving me an additional inch of shaft travel before the shocks would bottom out. This process was both easier and harder than the top mounts. On the one hand, I had plenty of room to work without removing the bed. On the other, there were hard brake lines all around the lower mounts and there was no way I could get a grinder in there without some serious risk.

    The first step then was removing the hard lines - a bit of a pain in that I'd have to bleed everything when I was done.

    [​IMG]

    Then, I was able to cut and grind off the lower mounts, just as I had with the tops. I was careful here to make sure I'd taken measurements of the position so that I'd be sure to correct correctly when I welded the new ones on!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Axles naked of shock mounts once again, I positioned the new mounts and tacked them on. I wanted to make sure that I could install the shock and ensure that it'd cycle correctly before buttoning everything up this time!

    [​IMG]

    Things looked good, so I finished welding, cleaning up, and painting everything for the second time. Hopefully the last time. That's what they say, right? Second time's a charm. :rofl: hahahahaha

    Finally, it was time to install the shocks and load everything up to double check that things looked good - and they did!

    [​IMG]

    It had been quite the project - or was it two? - upgrading my shocks, bump stops, and relocating everything at the same time. But it was a great experience - one that taught me so much more than having done it right the first time, not really understanding why (or thinking I understood why but having that understanding be incorrect).

    Thumbs up all around. :thumbsup:


     
  9. Feb 11, 2019 at 8:45 AM
    #1849
    christyle

    christyle 107

    Joined:
    May 16, 2017
    Member:
    #219225
    Messages:
    1,063
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Chino Hills, CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 DCSB TRD Off Road
    FOX 2.5 DSCs, RXT Leafs, armor
    That's more like it, lookin good!
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.
  10. Feb 11, 2019 at 9:21 AM
    #1850
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Member:
    #48500
    Messages:
    74,673
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Monte
    Wyoming/St. Louis
    Vehicle:
    The Trifecta of Taco's
    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    shoulda welded on some resi mounts while you where there too.
     
    CowboyTaco likes this.
  11. Feb 11, 2019 at 9:21 AM
    #1851
    BKinzey

    BKinzey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2016
    Member:
    #186211
    Messages:
    609
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Beauford
    Hollywierd, CA
    Vehicle:
    2015 White Tacoma Access Cab TRD Off Road 4x4 V6
    None yet
    Nice write up... Again. ;)

    So, can you talk a little bit more on driving without rear shocks? I thought it would be like driving a rocking horse and be difficult.

    Then, what's the beer can protecting?
     
    Wild Crow and turbodb [OP] like this.
  12. Feb 11, 2019 at 10:17 AM
    #1852
    turbodb

    turbodb [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Member:
    #177696
    Messages:
    3,602
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tacoma Xcab 4x4 SR5 V6 TRD
    AdventureTaco
    Thanks man!

    Nah, I like the cheap minimalist approach. Plus, gotta keep the pounds off (as though the resi mounts would matter). Hahahahahaha.

    Driving without rear shocks was like driving a rocking horse. When we were on the Mojave Road, we'd hit these little sections of whoops (like 50-100 in a row) that would have been amazing to drive with shocks, but which caused us to have to slow down to like 5-7mph because we were hitting the resonant frequency of the springs, and pretty quickly then getting into the bump stops. Definitely kept the speed down on the trip!

    And the beer can is a heat shield for the resi hose. It's hard to tell from the angle of the photo, but the exhaust is about 2.5" from the hose at that point and I was a little worried that it would be too hot. When we put on the can, it was cool to the touch even when the exhaust itself was too hot to touch. Don't know if I really need it, but decided to leave it as a tribute to the fun I had putting it all together with Zane.
     
    Yetimetchkangmi likes this.
  13. Feb 11, 2019 at 11:09 AM
    #1853
    christyle

    christyle 107

    Joined:
    May 16, 2017
    Member:
    #219225
    Messages:
    1,063
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Chino Hills, CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 DCSB TRD Off Road
    FOX 2.5 DSCs, RXT Leafs, armor
    I remember a section on there when we were heading W to E that ended at a road and railroad crossing and it was terrible, even with shocks. Seems like it was a half hour to 45 minutes of just straight rocking horse whoops, big enough that the real LT guys were really able to pull away from us regular peasants.
     
    desertjunkie760 and turbodb [OP] like this.
  14. Feb 11, 2019 at 11:16 AM
    #1854
    Wolftaco0503

    Wolftaco0503 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2015
    Member:
    #168040
    Messages:
    12,609
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Adam
    Chicago
    Vehicle:
    2013 Super White LONG BED TRD SPORT 4x4
    Maglite mod Bottle Opener in bed Weathertech Mats Front & Back
    Nice write up & Well done sir.
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.
  15. Feb 14, 2019 at 12:27 AM
    #1855
    DetroitDarin

    DetroitDarin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2018
    Member:
    #270720
    Messages:
    59
    Gender:
    Male
    You may remember I joined this forum just to read your trip reports; they never disappoint. Ever think of collecting them into a coffee table book? Also - have you ever charted your 'hang on, i have to get out and grab a photo' in terms of additional time required to go anywhere? As a travel voyeur I so-greatly appreciate you doing that. We don't have adventures like this in Europe; making me eager to get back to the states, frankly.
     
    turbodb [OP] and JasonLee like this.
  16. Feb 15, 2019 at 8:34 AM
    #1856
    JasonLee

    JasonLee Hello? I'm a truck.

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Member:
    #129454
    Messages:
    2,347
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jason
    Gold Hill, CO
    Vehicle:
    03 DC TRD 4x4
    OME suspension + Dakar AAL + 255/75R17 BFG KO2 + Snugtop XTR + Tundra brakes
    So, if you already took up the space where the spare tire lived when it rolled off the lot, why not mount the shocks diagonally? Like, keep the bottoms mounted where they are on the axle but move the tops in closer to the center of that crossbeam.
     
  17. Feb 15, 2019 at 8:41 AM
    #1857
    Blackdawg

    Blackdawg Dr. Frankenstein

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Member:
    #48500
    Messages:
    74,673
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Monte
    Wyoming/St. Louis
    Vehicle:
    The Trifecta of Taco's
    ALL OF THEM!...Then some more.
    Decreases the lever ratio on shocks and because it's at an angle makes it trickier to tune.

    No real advantage to doing that with 10" shocks as the leaf packs cycle 10" no matter what.

    It can be handy Todo that to shorter shocks or longer shocks to kind of force them to work there.

    But either way, a more vertical shock is going to give you more control and work more effectively than an angled one.
     
    turbodb [OP], JasonLee and jubei like this.
  18. Feb 15, 2019 at 8:42 AM
    #1858
    desertjunkie760

    desertjunkie760 @DesertJunkie760 (IG)

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Member:
    #183963
    Messages:
    5,270
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Shane
    Vehicle:
    2011 MGM DCSB TRD Sport 4x4
    Check My Sig.
    The more centered you move the shocks, the less stability you achieve. It's a balance and typically application based.

    You can achieve similar results by tilting the shocks forward or backward and not loose the stability.

    There's also this.
     
    turbodb [OP] and JasonLee like this.
  19. Feb 15, 2019 at 8:56 AM
    #1859
    JasonLee

    JasonLee Hello? I'm a truck.

    Joined:
    May 9, 2014
    Member:
    #129454
    Messages:
    2,347
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jason
    Gold Hill, CO
    Vehicle:
    03 DC TRD 4x4
    OME suspension + Dakar AAL + 255/75R17 BFG KO2 + Snugtop XTR + Tundra brakes
    Thanks. I'm still learning what the options are for the 1st gens for the eventual day where I have some spare cash around and start upgrading again.
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.
  20. Feb 15, 2019 at 9:25 AM
    #1860
    cynicalrider

    cynicalrider #NFG

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Member:
    #83399
    Messages:
    11,722
    Gender:
    Male
    Jersey
    Vehicle:
    01 SR5 TRD 4x4
    Drop bracket lift and booger welds
    I feel I've asked this before, but how much did those ADS rear's run you?
     
    turbodb [OP] likes this.

Products Discussed in

To Top