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Anti-Sieze...Yes or No???

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by Elkhound, Mar 19, 2013.

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Anti-sieze... Yes or No?

Poll closed Apr 18, 2013.
  1. YES-always use anti-sieze

    52 vote(s)
    83.9%
  2. NO-follow plug manufacturers directions

    10 vote(s)
    16.1%
  1. Mar 22, 2013 at 6:36 AM
    #21
    Spoonman

    Spoonman Granite Guru

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    Air fuel sensor... That's a new one to me. O2 sensors measure oxygen of course. I don't think there's any sensor to measure the a/f ratio, good sir. O2 does it all
     
  2. Mar 22, 2013 at 6:40 AM
    #22
    stroked383z

    stroked383z Well-Known Member

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    Yes use it... and I always used Copper anti seize from NAPA. I had a 2002 STS Turbo Camaro that I had to change the plugs on regularly. Helped a bunch with aluminum heads :)
     
  3. Mar 22, 2013 at 7:59 AM
    #23
    Vstrom30

    Vstrom30 Well-Known Member

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    Toyota calls them AF sensors good sir, and they use a 5 volt reference signal. A standard O2 measures up to 1 volt. Toyota uses AF sensors before the cat and an O2 after the cat. An AF sensor can also be referred to as a wide-band O2 sensor. The 2 sensors are not the same.
     
  4. Mar 22, 2013 at 8:25 AM
    #24
    OZ-T

    OZ-T All of those moments....will be lost.....in time

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  5. Mar 22, 2013 at 9:00 AM
    #25
    Vstrom30

    Vstrom30 Well-Known Member

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    Also Spoonman, you are correct in saying they only measure oxygen. An air fuel sensor is just more accurate than a standard O2. I am not trying to bump heads.
     
  6. Mar 26, 2013 at 7:38 AM
    #26
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 ASE Master Tech Vendor

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    As mentioned, the AF sensor is more of a wide band sensor. It is still an oxygen sensor in the grand scheme of things, but it is much more sensitively accurate, and allows the computer to have a much more accurate control of fuel trim. They are however built totally different, even though their outside appearance is nearly identical.

    The problem stems from the never vehicles running much more lean than they were in the past. In order to properly maintain this, and monitor it, a newer sensor was needed that could provide the computers with much more accurate measurements. The operation of these two types of sensors are completely different, and you cannot use the older method of circuit testing to test the newer AF sensors.
     
  7. Mar 26, 2013 at 8:18 AM
    #27
    Failure2Comply

    Failure2Comply Well-Known Member

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  8. Mar 26, 2013 at 7:58 PM
    #28
    maxamillion2345

    maxamillion2345 Go home if you don't like guns liquor and whores.

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    Agree 100%.
     
  9. Mar 31, 2013 at 9:19 AM
    #29
    ndcmack

    ndcmack Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Absolutly use it!
     
  10. Mar 31, 2013 at 9:33 AM
    #30
    miniceptor86

    miniceptor86 Well-Known Member

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    I always use anti-seize on any fastener that is threading into aluminum (or aluminium if you like). I've dealt with too many seized fasteners in motorcycles. I've learned my lesson. Have to think that all the seized plugs in early Ford V-10 with Aluminum heads might have prevented with anti-seize.
     
  11. Apr 3, 2013 at 9:10 AM
    #31
    Elkhound

    Elkhound [OP] Member

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    Thanks for all the posts:D I changed out the plugs on Sunday and did use anti-seize. You would'nt believe the squeeking noise the plugs made as I removed them!I can't imagine not using anti-seize after hearing that noise...The old plugs still had some life left. I have found that the engine starts quicker with the new plugs and has a bit more power.
     
  12. Apr 3, 2013 at 1:04 PM
    #32
    aficianado

    aficianado Well-Known Member

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    i've done alot of plugs. i've never used anti seize before. my porsches have alum heads, never had an issue. i pulled stock plugs out my my 1975 911, they came out easy. old ancient plugs! my 1981 car i am not worried.

    i had a bottle laying around for some exhaust work i did on that car, so i did use it this last time on my tacoma plug change. two reasons:
    1. it couldnt hurt, if i was using just a little bit on the threads.
    2. you guys freaked me out. i imagined stripped thread and huge bills. :)
     
  13. Apr 3, 2013 at 1:14 PM
    #33
    DGXR

    DGXR Well-Known Member

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    Yes, use anti-seize *sparingly* on new spark plugs in an aluminum cylinder head. Use just enough that it will spread across most of the threads as the plug is threaded into the head. There's no reason to use more, it will just make a mess at the bottom of the plug hole as the threads push out the excess. Be sure not to get any on the electrode!
     
  14. Apr 5, 2013 at 8:32 PM
    #34
    Rich91710

    Rich91710 Well-Known Member

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    +1

    I put a pea-sized ball on my finger and that is more than enough for all 4 plugs. Put a dab on each plug, 3 or 4 threads up from the bottom, clean off my finger, then roll my finger around the plugs so the AS is only in the valleys and not on the peaks, and there's still valleys over the AS between the peaks... the surface is not flush.
    Just a VERY light coating.
     
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