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Brakes "pulsing" - Rotors?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by YoterHead, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. Mar 9, 2010 at 11:39 AM
    #1
    YoterHead

    YoterHead [OP] Well-Known Member

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    My '08 has 46500 miles on it and the brakes have had a "pulse" and a mild squeak that coincides with it for a while now. Does the pulse indicate that my rotors are warped? I searched a little bit, and it seems people are split between a rotor needing machined/turned and just replacing it. I wouldn't want to waste money on pads to go with machined rotors just to have to replaced them again if the rotor is bad.

    I'm not sure if I want an OEM replacement if this is all the longer the rotor is going to last. I don't drive hard and only brake hard when needed. It looks like a lot of people who don't do OEM use SP performance slotted rotors with Hawk pads.

    Would it be worth it to try having my rotors machined and get new pads? Or should I just skip that and go for new aftermarket rotors and pads? I don't plan on installing these myself, how much for the install of new pads and rotors on average? How much to turn them?
     
  2. Mar 9, 2010 at 11:41 AM
    #2
    Kyouto42

    Kyouto42 Iron Beard

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    If you're not driving hard... and if they are warped... I'd be looking into how they got warped to start with first. Caliper sticking, uneven clamping force, ect... just look at the pads it'll tell you a lot. After that's fixed... I'd get new rotors. Once they're warped, getting them machined is usually just a temporary fix and it'll return.
     
  3. Mar 9, 2010 at 11:41 AM
    #3
    MachoTaco10

    MachoTaco10 Well-Known Member

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    your rotors are warped. common happens to all vehicles rotors after a while due to heat. slotted rotors would fix that but not really needed
     
  4. Mar 9, 2010 at 11:53 AM
    #4
    YoterHead

    YoterHead [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I do drive in a good ammount of stop and go traffic. Maybe that is causing the heat? So the slotted rotors are basically better for heat dissapation?

    If I go into a dealer and ask for a brake service that would include rotors, pads, and tightening/inspecting the drums, what's the sticker shock they're going to throw at me?
     
  5. Mar 9, 2010 at 12:06 PM
    #5
    Kyouto42

    Kyouto42 Iron Beard

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    You shouldn't need slotted rotors for normal driving. If you're running a supercharger, racing it, stopping hard constantly... or doing some pretty consistent hefty towing... then yea maybe consider it. Slotted rotors are going to eat your pads up pretty quick too.
     
  6. Mar 9, 2010 at 12:07 PM
    #6
    MachoTaco10

    MachoTaco10 Well-Known Member

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    Honestly man, even if you are not mechanically inclined a disc brake change is about the easiest thing you can do. I wish i was near you I would throw them on for ya. The dealerships get anywhere from 90-110 per hour now...crazy i know. So they will charge you a minimum of 2hours and about $200 dollars for parts. Looking at anywhere between $400-550 dollars for a simple barke change. Where as doing it yourself would net you about $200 max for all new rotors, pads, and lube
     
  7. Mar 9, 2010 at 12:12 PM
    #7
    MachoTaco10

    MachoTaco10 Well-Known Member

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  8. Mar 9, 2010 at 12:15 PM
    #8
    YoterHead

    YoterHead [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I'm not far from being mechanically inclined. My big problem is I live in an apartment with limited tools. I've actually done pads on my old S-10 before. I'll probably end up getting the needed parts and doing it at my dad's house (has a barn full of tools) the next time I drive up to visit.

    So, I should be set tool-wise. Do I just need to get a hold of OEM rotors and pads?
     
  9. Mar 9, 2010 at 12:18 PM
    #9
    MachoTaco10

    MachoTaco10 Well-Known Member

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    ya OEM is just fine
     
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