1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Brakes

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Sfcmcmahon, Jun 22, 2023.

  1. Jun 22, 2023 at 1:39 PM
    #1
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
    Hey folks!

    I was told in a past inspection that I need new brakes. (As some of you know, I don't really know what I'm doing but I'll get the job done) Can you tell by the pictures if I need pads, calipers, rotors? I was planning to just replace the pads with OEM but I'd love to hear what you have to say. Thanks in advance!

    IMG_9660.jpg
    IMG_9661.jpg
    IMG_9662.jpg
    IMG_9664.jpg
    IMG_9667.jpg
    IMG_9668.jpg
    IMG_9669.jpg
     
  2. Jun 22, 2023 at 1:50 PM
    #2
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Member:
    #114055
    Messages:
    14,009
    Gender:
    Male
    SoCal
    Vehicle:
    13 DCSB TRD OR v6 Auto
    HOLY WHEEL WEIGHTS BATMAN!

    Take the rotors to get turned, replace the pads n call it good.
     
  3. Jun 22, 2023 at 1:54 PM
    #3
    Bishop84

    Bishop84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Member:
    #172494
    Messages:
    10,582
    Gender:
    Male
    Need to machine or replace the rotors.

    Pads do not wear the rotor flat, so it bows and creates a U shape on the rotor face.

    So when you install the new pads, the force will be only on the outside of the U and have irregular wear.

    Also I think you have aftermarket pads in there right now, and the shims on the pads need to be transferred, or you need to buy OEM shims (if you want oem pads). Sometimes aftermarket shims don't like to come off the pad and will break on removal.
     
    TnShooter, Nessmuk and Sfcmcmahon[OP] like this.
  4. Jun 22, 2023 at 1:58 PM
    #4
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
  5. Jun 22, 2023 at 2:12 PM
    #5
    TnShooter

    TnShooter The TacomaWorld Stray

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Member:
    #42625
    Messages:
    17,637
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Deogee
    Vehicle:
    07' TRD Off-Road, Auto
    STOCK
    I think I have a set laying in the garage..:rofl:
    I’ve managed to get the rear brakes done. (Same company)
    But the front are still “good enough”.

    If the hardware for the front is like the rear.
    I’d suggest getting new hardware.

    Other than that, I’m happy with the rears.
    Shoes and drums seem to be good quality.
    But the hardware?…….Not so much.
     
  6. Jun 22, 2023 at 2:16 PM
    #6
    Bishop84

    Bishop84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Member:
    #172494
    Messages:
    10,582
    Gender:
    Male
    Power stop is ok for the money, it looks like a 5 lug pad set but in the customer section its saying its 6 lug.

    Kinda odd. But looks ok to order.
     
    TnShooter and Sfcmcmahon[OP] like this.
  7. Jun 22, 2023 at 2:29 PM
    #7
    BlkDakDave

    BlkDakDave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2012
    Member:
    #89422
    Messages:
    1,050
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    David
    CC TX
    Vehicle:
    07 AC PreRunner TRD/Off Road
    Sfcmcmahon[OP] likes this.
  8. Jun 22, 2023 at 3:02 PM
    #8
    Waasheem

    Waasheem The catholic radio bear

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Member:
    #297494
    Messages:
    2,668
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Waasheem
    Vehicle:
    2007 xrunner
    I’ll try to explain. The last picture. The brown rusty part, the rotor. The rectangle with 2 pins in the outer holes & 2 little ear’s with holes, the pad. The gap between is the brake friction material, which does look thin.

    Doing a brake job on discs is very simple, even for someone who claims to not know what they’re doing. You could probably find a step by step instruction in the stickies, or a video.

    Drums on the other hand is complicated but not impossible. It can be done with sockets, pliers, screwdrivers but your hands will hurt, your head will hurt, and your cussing vocabulary will be exercised. It’s so much easier with the brake drum shoe specific tools. It also helps to take pictures before taking it apart or do one side at a time. Have a friend to call if you get stumped.
     
    BlkDakDave likes this.
  9. Jun 22, 2023 at 3:46 PM
    #9
    Blockhead

    Blockhead Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156849
    Messages:
    1,867
    Gender:
    Male
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Vehicle:
    2019 magnetic gray DCLB
    OEM pads, rotors and shims. Start from scratch, do it right.
     
    Sfcmcmahon[OP] likes this.
  10. Jun 22, 2023 at 4:08 PM
    #10
    dtaco10

    dtaco10 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2018
    Member:
    #258356
    Messages:
    639
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dave
    Anoka County, Minnesota
    Vehicle:
    2010 White Tacoma 4x4, 4.0, Auto
    I look at what's left of the pad material and the only to do it is to take the wheel off. I just checked mine when I did an oil change and rotated the tires. I measured mine with a caliper and one pad measured about 3 mm or so and the other three were about 4 mm or so, so I'm letting it go for another oil change and will check them again. I did order Akebono pads and Advice rotors from Rock Auto. Apparently, Akebono pads are U.S. made. The rotors came with a certified sticker on them saying something like "certified high carbon". It's the first time I've seen such a sticker on rotors.
     
    Sfcmcmahon[OP] likes this.
  11. Jun 22, 2023 at 5:05 PM
    #11
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
  12. Jun 22, 2023 at 5:21 PM
    #12
    TnShooter

    TnShooter The TacomaWorld Stray

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Member:
    #42625
    Messages:
    17,637
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Deogee
    Vehicle:
    07' TRD Off-Road, Auto
    STOCK
    I don’t know about for the Tacoma.
    But we used the on my dad’s 2015 Ram and they were great.
    The only thing I have to say is the brake fluid leaked out of the bottle in shipping.
    Other than that, they have been great.
     
  13. Jun 23, 2023 at 2:57 AM
    #13
    Blockhead

    Blockhead Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156849
    Messages:
    1,867
    Gender:
    Male
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Vehicle:
    2019 magnetic gray DCLB
  14. Jun 23, 2023 at 4:45 AM
    #14
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
    Great point! I'm all about OEM, just trying to keep the cost low and the performance equal.
     
  15. Jun 23, 2023 at 5:13 AM
    #15
    lbhsbz

    lbhsbz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Member:
    #27618
    Messages:
    479
    Gender:
    Male
    You DO NOT need to replace or turn the rotors. I actually recommend against it unless there is a problem (like a pulsation/judder, rotors too thin, excessive grooving, etc). Based on the pictures, those rotors look to be in excellent shape. You will be fine simply changing the pads. If you're happy with the performance of the OEMs, I would go with those...
     
    Sfcmcmahon[OP] likes this.
  16. Jun 23, 2023 at 6:55 AM
    #16
    dtaco10

    dtaco10 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2018
    Member:
    #258356
    Messages:
    639
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dave
    Anoka County, Minnesota
    Vehicle:
    2010 White Tacoma 4x4, 4.0, Auto
    I don't believe most of us need drilled and slotted rotors. It would be interesting to know how they can package it at that cost. You're talking about two drilled and slotted rotors, pads, and brake fluid.
     
  17. Jun 23, 2023 at 7:07 AM
    #17
    lbhsbz

    lbhsbz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Member:
    #27618
    Messages:
    479
    Gender:
    Male
    Plain rotors will offer the best performance on a street driven vehicle, as well as the best longevity in the rust belt areas.

    A rotor is a friction surface and a heat sink....that's it.

    What happens when we take a friction surface, then mill a bunch of slots and drill a bunch of holes in it which REDUCES the surface area? We have less friction surface

    A heat sink needs mass....drilling holes and milling slots reduces the mass of the rotor, making for a less effective heat sink...sorta.

    Claims are made all the time that a drilled and slotted rotor will cool better, which is true...BUT

    Keeping in mind that all brakes do is convert kinetic energy into heat, let's use an example of a 4000lb truck going 60mph and coming to a complete stop in 200ft...the rest of the numbers are made up just to get the point across. That braking event, regardless of what parts you are using, is creating (converting) X amount of heat. If we put X amount of heat into a plain rotor with 100 units of mass, that rotor may get to 300°. If we put X amount of heat into a rotor with 90 units of mass, that rotor may get to 330°. Less mass will end up at a higher temperature after absorbing the same level of heat energy. Now, we have slots and drill holes which helps a bit with airflow which will likely cool that slotted and drilled rotor faster than a plain rotor would cool.

    Now we have a rotor that gets hotter faster and cools faster, we call that thermal shock. What causes cast iron to crack? Thermal Shock.

    Some people think slotted and drilled rotors look cool....that's the only reason to use them.

    in the rust belt, the failure mode of ever brake rotor is going to be to surface degregation due to rust. Rust will start around the inside and outside of the swept area, and slowly creep into the friction surface until the surface condition is so poor that the brakes simply aren't very effective. If we add holes and slots, we'll now have rust forming in these features, making them mostly useless, and creeping out into the friction surface from each hole and slot, in addition to rust coming in from the ID and OD of the swept area...so the rotor surface will be consumed by rust faster.

    I prefer plain rotors on everything I own.
     
  18. Jun 23, 2023 at 7:12 AM
    #18
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
    Just curious why you recommend against turning or replacing rotors. I read your more recent post as well. You obviously know what you are talking about or you're an amazing BS'er!
     
  19. Jun 23, 2023 at 7:24 AM
    #19
    Sfcmcmahon

    Sfcmcmahon [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Member:
    #203721
    Messages:
    121
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Central Florida
    Vehicle:
    2013 Tacoma TRD Sport 4x4
    Of course I prefer the best performance I can afford. I want excellent stopping power, I don't want my brakes to squeal, they don't have to last 5 years. Which brake pads would your recommend? Also, is there a need for a caliper repair kit? Anything else I can do to improve my stopping performance? Thank you for your advice!
     
  20. Jun 23, 2023 at 7:26 AM
    #20
    dtaco10

    dtaco10 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2018
    Member:
    #258356
    Messages:
    639
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dave
    Anoka County, Minnesota
    Vehicle:
    2010 White Tacoma 4x4, 4.0, Auto
    The one thing you have to remember about turning rotors or drums is there is no guarantee that they will be within minimum spec when complete. You could just as well put the cost of machining to a good set of rotors.
     
    Blockhead and Sfcmcmahon[OP] like this.
To Top