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Career Advice? I need help

Discussion in 'Jobs & Careers' started by cab4you26, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. Nov 11, 2010 at 6:51 PM
    #1
    cab4you26

    cab4you26 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Corey
    VA
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    97 Tacoma, 5spd 2.7L
    Wheelers Offroad black steel wheels, 12 disc changer, spray in bedliner, Black UWS toolbox, Kelly Safari TSR's, Dynomax Super Turbo
    So currently I'm 17, turn 18 in a month. I've taken two years in an automechanics class and I leave school around 1ish to go to work. I work at a car dealership in the commercial fleet center with Duramax diesels and GM vehicles. Graduation is coming very fast for me and I don't have a clue what I want to do or where I want to go to school. After working at a dealer I don't see myself doing a commission job like this for a living. All the guys I work with bitch about so&so stealing all the gravy work blah blah, they are like little girls sometimes. I have connections with the railroad and have a good chance of getting on with them when I turn 18. I don't know what I want to do for a living and I don't have a clue where I want to go to school. I have a girlfriend of 3 years (i've liked this girl since elementary school...) and I don't see that changing for me. I see myself doing something with any kind of mechanics (like the railroad, maybe planes? ships? heavy diesel?) or anything of that nature....that I can't think of. I don't know where to start after I graduate, and I haven't even applied to any colleges yet. Can any of you guys give me some advice?
     
  2. Nov 11, 2010 at 6:58 PM
    #2
    757southpaw

    757southpaw Well-Known Member

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    The railroad opportunity could be a good one. Just like any career, you just have to stick with it. If you are not business oriented and don't like taking risk, the military could be a great starting point. There are alot of benifits with going the military route such as the GI Bill!...I wish I would of...I'd be retireing in a couple years! Good luck man!
     
  3. Nov 11, 2010 at 7:16 PM
    #3
    Irish7

    Irish7 Fire Captain

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    Arizona
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    Procomp 6" lift, Procomp 18 x 9.5 wheels with Nitto 33" Terra Grapplers. TRD Preformance Exhaust. Bully tailgate pad lock, Front Bed Factory D-rings.
    You don't have to figure it all out right out of high school. Going to your local commuity college for a two year degree (AA) will only help and open career opportunities you haven't even thought of at this point. Community colleges offer automotive classes as well as all types of welding. X2 on the military. you could come out with a GI bill worth about 80,000 if you bank toward it while you are in. You could even attend community college while you serve. Walk on careers are far and few between these days. Think about getting your education while your young. I have two boys 20 and 19 that have completed their AA or just about to finish it. their seeing the benefits already. It will pay off in the short and long run for you. Good Luck..
     
  4. Nov 11, 2010 at 7:24 PM
    #4
    cab4you26

    cab4you26 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Corey
    VA
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    97 Tacoma, 5spd 2.7L
    Wheelers Offroad black steel wheels, 12 disc changer, spray in bedliner, Black UWS toolbox, Kelly Safari TSR's, Dynomax Super Turbo
    Can one of you explain more abouit the G.I. Bill? I've heard about it and kinda read about it but I still don't really know how it works. I've thought about community college and that is looking better and better for me the more I think about it. The automechanics classes for that college are through the trade school I went to, but the classes are kind of a joke. I already know how to weld....well just with a wire feed which is basically retard proof but it's still welding.
     
  5. Nov 11, 2010 at 7:35 PM
    #5
    757southpaw

    757southpaw Well-Known Member

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    07' DC LB TRD Sport 4x4
    BAK BakFlip Tonneau cover, 30% front tinted windows, AVS vent shades, Black Billet Grill,Pop& Lock, secondary air filter removed, Goodyear Duratrac's, Billies @ 2.5" on front, Billies on back w/ 1.5" AAL, Toytec Diff drop, NOKYA Hyper Yellow fog light bulbs, LaminX Weathertechs, Rear diff breather mod, BHLM
    All i know about the GI Bill is money that the military/government gives to you to go to school. I beleive it's during and after you've served you're time!? I'm sure someone on TW can explain it to you alot better than I can b/c I have no experience with it!
     
  6. Nov 12, 2010 at 10:29 AM
    #6
    Irish7

    Irish7 Fire Captain

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    Joe
    Arizona
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    2011 TRD Sport 4x4 LB
    Procomp 6" lift, Procomp 18 x 9.5 wheels with Nitto 33" Terra Grapplers. TRD Preformance Exhaust. Bully tailgate pad lock, Front Bed Factory D-rings.
    To get all of the details of the GI bill, drop in to your local recruiters. See if and what MOS or jobs you might be interested in. Your recruiter can show you a list of jobs offered by the military, all of the branches are honorable, you would just have to choose which one best fits you. There are a lot of career opportunities that you learn in the military that can transfer with you when you return back to civilian life. Just remember that your recruiter is there to enlist and they will make any job sound exciting. So, if that is an avenue you want to pursue go in with your eyes wide open and see what they can offer you to put you in a career that you want not what they need to fill. My youngest brother took the Army route, went in as a mechanic. He spent most of his time in europe.While in he contributedto his army college fund the entire time he was in. when he got out he put himself through A&P school in Colorado. He's working as a aircraft mechanic mostly on helicopters for a large corporation making bank. If it wasn't for the GI bill that option would not have been there for him. So no matter what you decide make it work for you. The other option is to talk to your career counselor at your community college to guide you into a career or take you where you think you want to go. Good luck and let me know how it turns out.
     
  7. Nov 12, 2010 at 10:53 AM
    #7
    Camdan

    Camdan Well-Known Member

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    My advice would be go to college get atleast a 2 year degree and then maybe pick up some type of trade. I am 23 and went to school for my A&P. It's a great field, but be willing to move off. I got lucky and found a job in my city due to FedEx here in Memphis. But I know a lot of people that are in the rail road industry and they love it and make pretty good money at the same time. Seriously though the degree is what will help you when it comes time for the job and for a promotion.
     
  8. Nov 12, 2010 at 11:11 AM
    #8
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    What are your interests and how did you do with your classes in school? Have you thought about engineering, maybe mechanical? It seems you're interested in how things work so maybe learning about why they work and how to make them work better would be an option. One of my friends designs brake kits for race cars for example. As far as being a mechanic, I'd try to set yourself apart somehow. Auto mechanics are everywhere, so you can either go that route and try to prove to everyone you're better than the next guy or do something like heavy equipment or work for the railroad. Trains these days are very complicated and may require some sort of degree to get a job working on them. Heavy civil and dirtwork contractors will pay well for a good mechanic. Their equipment is their livelyhood and downtime costs a lot of money and loses money. If you can prove you're worth it, most of the better contractors will pay well for a good, reliable mechanic.
     
  9. Nov 14, 2010 at 5:56 AM
    #9
    cab4you26

    cab4you26 [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    First Name:
    Corey
    VA
    Vehicle:
    97 Tacoma, 5spd 2.7L
    Wheelers Offroad black steel wheels, 12 disc changer, spray in bedliner, Black UWS toolbox, Kelly Safari TSR's, Dynomax Super Turbo
    I do plan on atleast going to a community college and getting a 2 year degree. I was actually thinking of taking a mechanical engineering class. That class transfers to ODU if I wanted to do that. I also think it'd be fun to work on heavy equipment or planes, or anything really. I almost feel like I have too many choices.
     
  10. Nov 14, 2010 at 6:08 AM
    #10
    MadeInMaine

    MadeInMaine MadeInMaine

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    my advice, from a guy who went to 4 years of college then worked for 5 years now about to go back to medical school, is to keep your ties with the railroad if that interests you (stay in contact, get an internship) and go to college and get a engineering degree.
    you will learn tons, get paid way more after school as you would now, and if you decide railroad isn't for you, you have way more options with the degree.
     
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