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Dealer brake job??

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas' started by kmp77, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. Aug 14, 2011 at 5:35 PM
    #1
    kmp77

    kmp77 [OP] New Member

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    I got my oil changed recently on my 2006 Tacoma and the dealer said next time I'll probably need a brake job (will be 65k miles). I asked how much and he said prob $380 for pads and machine the rotors. Is this seem out of wack price wise?

    If so, what can I do to save some money outside of doing it myself? I don't have the tools etc. If I buy the brakes myself and have them put it on, will that save a significant amount? I think a set is like $50 outside of the dealer. I'm thinking the dealer charges like $150. Could be wrong. Or would it be better to buy the pads I want and find a mechanic to put them on and handle the rotors? I just don't have a mechanic I trust here so will have to investigate that.
     
  2. Aug 14, 2011 at 5:38 PM
    #2
    TACK

    TACK Well-Known Member

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    $380 is atrocious. Buy the pads yourself for $20 and slide them in. Does the truck shake or do you feel a vibration when you brake? If so the rotors need machined. You can probably take them to a shop and have them done, saving more money.

    Edit: or if the rotors have grooves in them and aren't smooth
     
  3. Aug 14, 2011 at 5:47 PM
    #3
    TACK

    TACK Well-Known Member

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    And I think all you need to do on these trucks to change the pads is pull out a cotter pin and slide them in/out.

    Most places won't go for you bringing in your own pads because they mark up the price of the parts outlandishly. That's how the rats make most of their money.
     
  4. Aug 14, 2011 at 6:42 PM
    #4
    zippythepinhead

    zippythepinhead Member

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    Get some good pads if you do it yourself. I use the Akebono ACT976 pads, which are $49 currently at Rock Auto (I can't link directly to Rock Auto catalog items). These are good pads, and I can get 35K miles out of one set, even when my wife drives the Sequoia almost exclusively. To give you a point of comparison, I paid my mechanic $250 to change the pads once, and he put in some cheap pads that only lasted 17K miles. What a waste of money...

    I'm not skilled at maintenance, but I have changed my own brake pads for years, and it is not hard. You can find threads here and there that can show you what to do.

    I never machine the rotors; the new pads will conform to the rotor surface very soon after installation.

    The one piece of advice I would give is make sure to:

    1) put a rag under your brake fluid reservoir, so that any overflow will be captured before it gets on engine components;
    2) be very careful when compressing the pistons in the caliper. I use a C-clamp, a big one, and I push both of them in at once.

    I learned the hard way that pushing one piston at a time is a poor strategy.
     
  5. Aug 14, 2011 at 7:35 PM
    #5
    LGE RAW

    LGE RAW Well-Known Member

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  6. Aug 15, 2011 at 6:02 AM
    #6
    skytower

    skytower Well-Known Member

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    I always do my own brakes. The savings have added up over the years.
    If you don't feel comfortable doing it by yourself, find a wrenching meet in your area, and let them give you pointers.
     
  7. Aug 15, 2011 at 12:44 PM
    #7
    buddywh1

    buddywh1 Well-Known Member

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    It may seem atrocious but it's not out of line with normal dealer pricing. But I wouldn't let them turn or 'cut' the rotors.

    If they're grooved or run-out is bad, i.e., warped, and the steering wheel shakes then replace them. It's far better than taking away metal that will just lead to early warping in the future.

    If nothing's wrong, or run-out is good but the wheel shakes from glazing deposits, then thoroughly roughen the surface with medium to coarse sand paper to break the glaze and bed the new pads.
     
  8. Aug 15, 2011 at 1:00 PM
    #8
    Junebug McQuinn

    Junebug McQuinn Well-Known Member

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    I always machine my rotors. I just take them down to the local auto parts store and they do them while I wait. I've done brake jobs without machining the rotors and only had a problem once, a really stiff pedal. I redid it, new pads and machined the rotors and it was fine. Ever since then I just go ahead and machine them, it gives the pads a fresh surface to work with. Just my $.02

    But yeah, $380 for a brake job is robbery. Screw that
     
  9. Aug 15, 2011 at 1:18 PM
    #9
    textoy

    textoy Well-Known Member

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    if it just pads, anyone can do it. If you need to remove the rotors and it is 4WD, then if becomes a job. If it is 2wd, removing rotors is easy.
     
  10. Aug 15, 2011 at 1:18 PM
    #10
    Jdaniel1274

    Jdaniel1274 Well-Known Member

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    Do your brakes yourself, cheaper! It is very easy to change brake pads and rotors if need be on the Tacoma's.
     
  11. Aug 15, 2011 at 1:27 PM
    #11
    Tacomanator

    Tacomanator Boiling denim and bangin whores

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    No one touches my brakes but me. That way, I know it's done right.
     
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