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Diet Taco... trying to keep things light

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Builds (2005-2015)' started by DVexile, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. Aug 28, 2018 at 1:28 PM
    #1021
    ericd

    ericd Stuff

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    For something like that you can take advantage of a deal and have them shipped to my place. It's not a big deal.
     
    Subway4X4, Drainbung and DVexile [OP] like this.
  2. Aug 28, 2018 at 3:32 PM
    #1022
    Scott B.

    Scott B. Well-Known Member

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    I just put a new set of KO2s on my truck, replacing the worn out ones. The noise level decreased dramatically, so I'd venture a guess that your noise observation was more related to worn out vs. new tires than a different tire design.

    I am curious, however, if the ST Maxx is a quieter tire.
     
    Crom, DVexile [OP] and Drainbung like this.
  3. Aug 28, 2018 at 4:38 PM
    #1023
    TXTaco13

    TXTaco13 Taco Enthusiast

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    It is
     
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  4. Aug 28, 2018 at 9:18 PM
    #1024
    Crom

    Crom Outside

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    Congrats on the new tires. Such a good feeling! ;)
     
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  5. Aug 28, 2018 at 9:39 PM
    #1025
    TXTaco13

    TXTaco13 Taco Enthusiast

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    So far I’ve put almost 15k on my ST MAXX, and really enjoy them. They handle great off road, wear evenly, and are pretty quiet. I was slightly hesitant about trying them over BFG because I ran those tires pretty much exclusively over the years, but am so glad I tried the Coopers. I will recommend one thing, rotate them regularly. I was able to get Discount to rotate mine every 3k, due to the aggressive tread on them. Enjoy the new tires, looking forward to your feedback on them!
     
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  6. Aug 28, 2018 at 10:15 PM
    #1026
    sawbladeduller

    sawbladeduller semi-realist

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    ....uhm big fan of ST/Maxx. i paid premium price to have a local family tire joint put them on. also have a set of the ST in 255, clearly an old design compared to ST/Maxx.
    i'd buy ST/Maxx again, but not the ST. I rotated the five wheels every six hundred miles for about the first 3600 miles, got them all set in that way. last time i saw you you were rotating wheels out at that awful SV site..dang it i ain't going out there again
     
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  7. Aug 30, 2018 at 1:34 PM
    #1027
    EdinCincinnati

    EdinCincinnati Old Enough To Know Better

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    2Lo Mod, OV Tuned ECU, Bed Cap, Prinsu and my kids college money
    Since @DVexile posted about SafeJacks products previously...just got an email from them about their LaborDay Sale!
    For 10% off use:
    Use code LABOR2018

    SafeJacks.com

    Good for 8/31 through 9/3
     
  8. Sep 3, 2018 at 6:42 PM
    #1028
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    August 2018

    This is a story of plans slowly going awry, but fortunately everyone still had fun...

    Just before school started for my daughter we were going to do a short camping trip. I knew from the start that late August is an annoying time to try to go camping as it is hot most places and usually much of the west is on fire sending smoke plumes everywhere. With that in mind the plan was to hit the area along Cottonwood Road in GSENM as it is at an elevation where temperatures would be moderated and there are lots of shady slot canyons right off the road. This was only going to be a three night trip.

    The first sign of trouble was when I was in the airport at 6AM EDT in BWI. Southwest often has a national radar map on their monitors at the gates. There was a lot of rain over southern Utah. Not good.

    I got into Las Vegas early on a Wednesday solo. My wife and daughter would drive up from the LA area having visited family on Thursday. I took the opportunity of the free day to get new tires on the truck. I also had to replace the battery. I had time to have some drinks and grub with @Mtnflyer which was great. Late that evening I called up the "to-do" list I keep for truck tasks and noted I was suppose to touch base with @ericd the next time I was in Vegas with some spare time. Doh! Moved that note to someplace I'd see it earlier next time...

    I also looked at the radar archive and sure enough a massive storm had moved across the southern end of Cottonwood Road the evening before. In the morning I provisioned the truck and called some of the GSENM visitor centers for road reports. Indeed the southern end of almost all the roads in that area were closed. Well most of the area we wanted to explore was on the north end anyway and it would take just a little longer to go around to the north end.

    A little after lunch my wife and daughter arrived. My wife had to scurry back to MD for work stuff so it was going to be another Daddy-Daughter trip. My poor daughter had already driven four hours this day and so I wanted to not make a dash all the way to GSENM. We decided to head to some dinosaur tracks near St. George that @Mtnflyer had told me about. That was about two hours away.

    We stopped in Mesquite about half way for a break and my daughter ran around the McDonald's playground for awhile. Hopped back into the truck to make the drive through the Virgin River gorge up to St. George. After about 35 minutes of driving I was thinking the skies might be photo worthy so I reached for my backpack. It wasn't there. It was back in the McDonald's. Oh crap. Pretty much everything expensive and important was in there.

    We turned back and after many attempted calls to McDonald's someone finally picked up and went and found the backpack. That was a relief. Still this added about 70 minutes more to our journey. My daughter was not pleased.

    More bad news was showing up on the radar as we drove. It appeared the northern end of Cottonwood Road was getting hammered now. I had also been keeping my eye on Hole In The Rock Road as so far it was free of any precipitation. Unfortunately that is even more driving and at a lower elevation but it was our backup to our backup.

    We finally got to our camp right above the dinosaur track site in twilight. I cooked a hot dog for my daughter and we got ready for bed. It was already an inauspicious start to the trip.

    [​IMG]
    Near Camp First Day
    We were up quite early in the morning which was good because I needed to get my daughter back onto EDT to be ready for school in a few days. We ate donuts for breakfast and got the truck all ready to go before we went looking for dinosaur tracks.

    My daughter is a total dinosaur nut who frequently corrects us or anyone else nearby when dinosaur facts or pronunciation is less than perfect. Seeing actual 190 million year old dinosaur tracks in the wild seemed pretty cool to her (and me to be honest).

    These are quite easy to find as there is decent signage. The tracks were first discovered in the 1980s. There are a few species of tracks but the largest and most obvious are believed to be from a Dilophosaurus. My daughter was thrilled to "discover" them for herself.

    [​IMG]
    Future Paleontologist
    With this minor success under our belt it was time to head towards GSENM. At this point I knew the trip was going to be down to managing driving time and entertainment for my daughter. We stopped in Cedar City for an early lunch and another McDonald's playground to keep her happy. Then we pressed on and after about two hours got to Cannonville and the GSNME Visitor Center there for road information.

    At Cannonville I asked if Cottonwood was closed. The ranger said, "Well, we are still figuring out how many people and vehicles we have to rescue from down there so yeah it is closed." She said the storm the day before had been epic and came on very fast and strong. Fortunately no one injured or killed but we were definitely going to have to continue on to Hole In The Rock Road.

    And so even more driving...

    We stopped at the Escalante Visitor Center. There was a huge fiberglass dinosaur in the lobby that was a Ceratopsian of some form (i.e. like Triceratops) but with more horns. I asked my daughter if she knew what it was. She thought for a moment and said no. I suggested maybe Styracosaurus since it looked like one to me and I thought maybe she forgot that one. Stupid me, no that pause before she had said "no" was in fact her cycling through some list of dinosaurs way beyond my knowledge and she patiently explained to me it couldn't be a Styracosaurus because of the pattern of the horns and it couldn't be a Einiosaurus (which I've never heard of) because it was missing a curved horn on its nose and so on. A ranger nearby helpfully noted this was recently discovered new species called Diabloceratops which explained why my daughter didn't recognize it. He also suggested based on overhearing our conversation that perhaps she would like to complete a paleontology workbook and earn a NPS Junior Paleontologist badge. This was a hit and she rapidly worked through the book and we left with a shiny new badge.

    And so finally we were headed down Hole In The Rock Road. It was afternoon and plenty warm so I wanted to stop someplace fun to climb (she insists on climbing things) with shade. Devil's Garden would fit the bill so we stopped there. She had a blast and there are plenty of shady nooks.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Hanging Around in Devil's Garden
    We could hear thunder rumbling in the distance and it was a bit late in the day to start a longer hike (not to mention hot) so we skipped doing any slot canyons. Even more driving brought us about 40 miles down the road to Dance Hall Rock where we camped nearby. It was toasty and we were both quite exhausted. Too much dang driving. With the Flip-Pac deployed and some nice breezes we made use of some hand pressurized misting bottles to keep cool. Hot dogs for dinner, marshmallows for dessert and early bedtime to get closer to EDT.

    Saturday morning we packed up camp and explored Dance Hall Rock. This is a really neat rock formation with a bit of history to it. My daughter loved the story of the not so cunning settlers who decided to head this direction from Escalante apparently unaware of the Colorado River in their way. They stopped at this rock to celebrate their great progress so far before their scouts had gotten back to tell them of what lay ahead. This area provided some good shady climbing spots.

    The plan for the rest of the day was originally to do Spooky Canyon, a really awesome slot canyon off of Dry Fork. It was, however, already getting quite hot despite being just eight in the morning. Unlike the canyons off of Cottonwood the ones off of this road require a fair bit of exposed hiking to get to. It was time to reevaluate.

    I sat down with my daughter and we talked about how much driving we had done, how much driving we'd have to do the next day to get back to Vegas and how it was going to be a hot hike to and from the slot canyon. I offered an alternative that we'd split up the return drive by doing some today, staying in a hotel (with a pool) in St. George and of course stopping by the visitor center again to get a different badge the ranger had talked about. Or we could do the slot canyon. Predictably she picked the badge and the hotel pool. And I was fine with that.

    So that was the end of the camping part of the trip! We really hardly got to do anything! The original plan would probably have worked out great, but it slowly fell apart as we were in route due to all the thunderstorms. It really was just way too much driving and being forced to lower elevations and away from shade made it quite uncomfortable for a six year old. She was a real trooper though.

    The rest of the trip became a tour of McDonald's playgrounds and hotel pools which was plenty fun enough for my daughter. It turned out my brother and his wife were in the St. George and Las Vegas area as well so we got to see them for a few meals which was also fun.

    From a camping perspective the trip was a bit of a failure. From a keeping my daughter happy perspective it was a success - which is all that really mattered.

    I think next August we are going to do something from a hotel instead... With a lot less driving too...
     
  9. Sep 8, 2018 at 9:52 AM
    #1029
    Soul Surfer

    Soul Surfer Church Of @ODNAREM•Jimi Was Last Seen: Chillin

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    I really like this idea and after seeing it on @scocar build thread i pieced together the recommended Jack along with some safe jack accessories, and a NOS Husky tool bag. Eventually I’ll add a decent support plate of some type. Thanks again Ken & Scott for sharing this Mod. :hattip:

    67CDAD42-CC95-419F-95CA-286FE6DC7CF3.jpg
     
  10. Sep 24, 2018 at 12:39 PM
    #1030
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Treadwear vs. Snow Rating
    A new KO2 tread compound...

    Posting this here since I ran the KO2 for awhile and this seems relevant for desert drivers.

    An interesting question came up in the KO2 thread today, someone was asking what was the difference between two identical sized KO2 tires in which one was "DT" and the other not. This KO2 DT thing was new to me, hadn't seen it when I looked at tires a few months ago. I was curious too so I did a chat with a representative on the BFG website and they said "DT" stands for "Different Tread" and these tires are using a different tread compound that they claim will be more durable off-road. They said it would only be available in certain sizes. They didn't specify if both DT and non-DT versions would continue to exist in those sizes but so far both are still listed on various vendor sites. The DT versions are very slightly heavier (well one of them is way more heavy but I strongly suspect that is a typo).

    Shortly after that chat a Discount Tire rep replied in the thread and pointed out that the new DT versions do not carry the 3PMSF rating/symbol on them like all the other KO2s do. The BFG website (which sort of sucks) makes no such mention of that but the Tire Rack site does clearly state the DT versions are not 3PMSF. So with two vendors saying the same thing I'm guessing it is true regardless of what the BFG site says. I hadn't been aware of that when I was chatting with the BFG rep so I didn't think to ask. I'm almost certain the new versions would still have "M+S" on the side of them even if they don't have the three peak symbol.

    So what is up? My guess is that this new compound is both sturdier and probably optimized for higher temps. Winter tires are only used in the winter precisely because they will wear super fast in the summer because their compound becomes too soft in the summer. Summer tires suck in the winter because the tread compound gets way too hard in cold temps to conform to surfaces which results in much worse traction. Now 3PMSF in no way makes something a winter tire, the tread compound still needs to wear well in the summer and the amount of siping is minimal as well again to keep wear reasonable. That said it would make sense that to get a 3PMSF rating a tire might need to use a compound with better cold temperature performance than a tire without 3PMSF. I suspect getting the 3PMSF symbol on the original KO2 version may have compromised its durability in warmer and rougher conditions and this new "more durable" DT version is instead using a compound that is stiffer at warmer temps and thus more durable as well. Obviously this is speculation on my part, maybe there is some other reason the DT version doesn't have a 3PMSF on it.

    This also reminded me of another KO2 and S/T Maxx difference. The S/T Maxx also does not carry a 3PMSF rating/symbol. It does however have M+S on the side like almost all off road A/Ts do. I'm wondering if the S/T Maxx's great ratings for durability and tread wear are down to a compound that is too hard to get a 3PMSF rating.

    Lastly - at least for those that do their exploring in CA and NV having that M+S (or M/S, or M-S) somewhere on the sidewall can be important. If you have tires with MS on them and 4WD you can enter R-2 chain control areas without having to put chains on (though you do need to carry chains in the vehicle). So at least in CA/NV you don't need the 3PMSF symbol to avoid chaining up, just the plain old MS on the sidewall is good enough. If you've ever driven under CA "chain controls" you know that they are really "crowd controls" and chains are completely unnecessary in most places (especially in So. Cal. mountains) but the CHP flips down the chain control signs just to manage the traffic. So I always double check my tires have MS on them in case I need to cross a pass under chain controls.
     
  11. Sep 25, 2018 at 6:11 AM
    #1031
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Improved Glow Stick
    A cheap, reusable 120 hour glow stick

    Been meaning to share this. Sometimes I want to mark a cairn or cache that I'll need to find later in the dark.

    A classic option for this is a chemical luminescent glow stick. These are reliable, weather proof and last about 12 hours though you if look hard enough you can find different chemistries that burn slower and dimmer or brighter and shorter. They aren't reusable of course though. And if not packed correctly can activate before you need them.

    Recently a number of manufacturers have made LED versions of these powered by button cells. They also typically last about 12 hours but then you can replace the batteries and use them again. Some of these offer fancy blinking options, multiple modes including a flashlight and some of them also have a automatic timer that turns them off. That last feature is annoying if you can't disable it!

    Some of the fancier ones include a current mode driver for the LED which ensures even illumination over the life of the batteries as well as making the batteries last longer. The cheapest ones directly connect the LED to batteries and so start out extremely bright when the batteries are fresh and thus drain the battery much faster than necessary until they start to become rather dim.

    All of these options as offered suck for multi-day use such as placing a cache three or four days before reaching it or wanting to mark a return point on a multi-day trip. Or if you are using them as a nightlight or toy for a kid on a trip you will burn through a bunch of batteries fast.

    I'm a EE so the suckiness of these choices annoyed me to no end. I thought about modifying one to be more efficient or only turn on in the dark or whatever. Fortunately I found a much easier and more elegant solution...

    Step One - Start with the cheapest stick possible


    The first thing to do is start with the cheapest, simplest sticks that do nothing other than connect the LED to the batteries. The above made by Life Gear are what you want. They make many versions, including fancier ones that blink and do all sorts of other stuff. Give those a pass. Get these ones that you screw to turn on. Available in red, green and blue. They are available at places like REI but also this time of year (Halloween) they tend to show up lots of places for cheap (like $3 a pair). I got mine from Target a number of years back for $1 each.

    Now the beauty of these is they will not try to outsmart you by turning themselves off after some amount of time. They just smoosh two contacts together when you screw the top down so the stack of three button cells are connected directly across the LEDs.

    The problem as mentioned before is that this direct connection draws way too much current when the batteries are fresh (about 90 mA in my measurements when 5 mA is more than enough). If only there was an easy way to fix that.

    Step Two - Get the right batteries

    It turns out there is just the right kind of battery to solve our problem with too much current and at the very same time also one that stores way more energy than the typical button cells. Unless you have hearing problems you probably don't know about them.

    The Magical Zinc-Air Battery

    Zinc-Air batteries have three times the energy density by volume than any other battery chemistry. That means for the little button cells these lights run on they can run for at least three times longer (but actually it is even better than that, see below). Why then doesn't the whole world run on Zinc-Air batteries? Well there are a few issues with them. The first is right in the name - "air" - they need oxygen to work. They are actually more like a fuel cell than a battery and they "breath" the air around them to work. A related problem is that once exposed to air they start working whether you need them or not. They come with a seal on them and once you remove the seal you better use up the battery in the next few weeks or it will be dead. This is just fine for a camping light though - tear off the seal at the start of your trip and throw the battery away at the end.

    So what are they used for? Well, they are primarily used in an application that has nearly continuous use and where a really small power source is a plus - hearing aids. You'll often see them referred to as "hearing aid batteries" and will most often find them in the pharmacy section rather than with the rest of the batteries. Another reason they are probably overlooked.

    One heck of a bonus feature

    Remember how the I said above the simplest LED sticks drain way too much current with new batteries? Basically there is no current limiter in the circuit so the LED sees the full voltage of the fresh battery and uses the internal resistance of the battery to current limit. With fresh batteries this isn't enough limiting and they run really bright and rapidly drain the battery. After an hour or so the battery has had nearly half its capacity drained but now the voltage lowers and so the LED draws less current and this is how things run for the remaining 10 hours or so. Some fancier LED sticks have circuitry inside them to try to better manage the current and so these can make things last longer but a number of these same sticks do annoying things like turn themselves off after an hour! Not what we want!

    Well the Zinc-Air has one other awesome "feature". It is more like a fuel cell than a battery so it's output current isn't limited by an internal resistance like a typical battery. Its current is limited by how quickly air can get inside battery cell to react with the electrolyte. Basically the current is limited by how many and how big the holes in the case are. It turns out since these are designed for hearing aids this limit is almost the perfect amount to illuminate the LED. Better still this kind of current limiting does not waste any energy like a resistor or linear current regulator would - so it is extremely efficient.

    Putting it all together

    These Zinc-Air batteries for hearing aids are pretty cheap. About $0.33 per battery in quantity. A glow stick takes three, so that's just $1 per use.

    The glow stick itself costs between $1 and $2.50 depending on when and who you purchase it from. You'll reuse it multiple times of course making its long term cost essentially zero but they are still so cheap that if you lose or break one it is no big deal.

    And how long does it last? I've tested them multiple times and their run time is more than 120 hours!!!!

    They actually run a lot longer than that but of course they eventually start to dim. After five solid days of continuous use they are still just about as bright as they are when first used. Do be aware though when you first turn one on it will be unusually bright for a few minutes because there is plenty of ready power in the fuel cell from oxygen stored in the cell. It will take a few minutes to deplete that and have the current limited by oxygen entering the holes in the battery case.

    Again once you remove the pull tab seal the battery needs to be used within a few weeks. In my tests I've run them continuously for five days without turning them off to evaluate their total energy storage. In the field if I'm using them as a night light for my daughter or to mark a campsite at night I typically turn them off during the day. I've run them after such a trip and verified they can at least hold their charge for up to two weeks from removing the seal.

    Last careful where you purchase these batteries. They have a more limited shelf life than most batteries and a lot of online vendors like to sell near expiration batteries at a discount. This is fine for a hearing aid user because they naturally use a lot of these fairly quickly and so buying a near expiration battery is no big deal. For an infrequent user like me that's not what I want so I make sure to buy from a reputable online seller or just go to the pharmacy where I can see what the expiration date on the package is.
     
  12. Sep 25, 2018 at 8:30 AM
    #1032
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    Great idea Ken! I'm a nerd when it comes to flashlights. It think you and I can agree that it's more about having the right amount of useable light rather than the brightest. One of my favorite lights to use is a small, no-name, 3-button cell light that I found in a small plastic bin by the register of a hardware store. It's about half the size of a standard chapstick tube and has an opaque white diffuser cap and carabiner attached. It's the perfect amount of light to use in my tent at night without blinding myself if I need to look for something in the dark. I've camped far too many times with people that have no "light discipline" and want to show you how bright their flashlight is only to ruin your ability to enjoy the night sky.
     
  13. Sep 25, 2018 at 3:18 PM
    #1033
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Indeed! I usually keep a very low light camp. Not only is it good for being able to enjoy the stars but if your eyes are mostly dark adapted you don't even need a light to walk around if there is any moonlight at all. I went to the trouble of setting up the lights in my Flip-Pac to be switchable between dim red and bright white but in the end I've almost never switched them to bright white. The dim red is plenty and a little bit of "task lighting" when needed from a headlamp works great. Originally I was thinking about external camp lights but after three years I can't think of a time I would have used them!

    That's a great idea. I usually have head lamps that by default come on with a dim red that can be switched to white if needed. But I generally don't have them on my head the whole time and really a small task light hanging around my neck or looped through a button hole would be even more useful. Hmmm... I'll have to look into that. Thanks!

    Yeah, some camps can literally be seen for miles. And OMG the bugs they attract!

    A few weekends ago we had a 1st grade camping trip with my daughter out here in MD. (For the record "camping" in MD is a pointless endeavor in my opinion but it was fun for the kids). A bunch of parents had given kids headlamps. That was hell.

    Well this is all reminding me that I've been meaning to write up some other camping lights stuff...
     
  14. Sep 25, 2018 at 3:38 PM
    #1034
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    Headlamps are great with red light. It's mostly what I use when out and about. What kills me is when people don't realize that you should point them towards the ground if you're going to talk to people rather than shine a bright light in their face. What I tend to remind people of when choosing camp lights or even aux truck lighting is, "what do you need it for?" I don't have high dollar lights on my truck with a 5 thousand mile throw and bazillion lumens because light that far out just isn't useful to me. Trophy trucks and all out race trucks actually need that much light because at the speeds they travel, obstacles close the distance quite rapidly. I can see out to 100 to maybe 200 yards with my lights and those are the obstacles that I need to be aware of at night if at all. Same goes for camp lights. I don't need 100 yard lights at camp, just something so I can see what my hands are doing. I have since removed some of my aux lighting on the truck based on what I actually use or need.

    Speaking of a small camp light that gives off useable diffused light, I have one of these on my pup's leash for night walks but also considered getting more in varying colors for camp. Might be useful to you:
    https://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ize-Spo...UTF8&qid=1537914664&sr=8-3&keywords=nite+eyes

    Secondly, in my search for a solution for broad light at camp, I though of a solution just haven rigged it up yet. This would be useful when camping in a larger group and camp is more spread out for night time cooking/cleaning duties, but even that that's a rare occasion for me. I was going to rig a small light or lantern to a expandable paint pole or something similar. This can be mounted to a bumper or roof rack when setting up for the evening and as night comes you turn on the light and hoist it up as far as it will go. That'll give a large radius of light but also keep the bugs up and away form camp and your food. Good enough idea, but nothing that I've found necessary as of yet.
     
  15. Sep 25, 2018 at 5:03 PM
    #1035
    ETAV8R

    ETAV8R Out DERP'n

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    Just the basics
    I still remember the amber lamp you have in back from our Mojave trip. At first I had no clue what it was for but when the dust started to get kicked up I fully understood. I could see your light but not your truck.

    Those small niteize are really cool.

    The idea of a light raised up high is also a good one. A friend described exactly the same thing a couple years ago and it makes good sense.
     
  16. Sep 25, 2018 at 5:37 PM
    #1036
    scocar

    scocar Treat the cause, not the symptom

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    Yeah, we're at the stage where we introduced flashlights and headlamps to the toddlers, which mostly ends in the parents screaming in agony ARRRGH MY EYES! DON'T LOOK AT ME!

    But the next step is discipline. Red lenses. And also just learning to use ambient light. I remember as a kid, and as an "older kid" (ahem) priding ourselves in moving about at night with no light in the hills (and other places). In fact, I came to the point of being able to move around my entire home in darkness and being able to find anything I need like that. Wife and kid changed that a bit...but still, I make an effort.

    Last time we were camping I realized I had the wrong headlamp, the one without the red mode, which was at home on my bench.

    Also got my new Leer cap with LED bars front and back. They are on a single switch, and too bright, so I'll need to change that to independent switching front and back, and change the actual light fixtures to dual mode red or white as time allows.

    The downside of today's lighting options.





    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

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    AND DON'T FORGET A HEATER!
     
  17. Sep 25, 2018 at 6:03 PM
    #1037
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    Dust lights are priceless when at speed and in caravan. I’ve since moved to just one light but it does it’s job. I usually give the car in front of me a lot of room but if the wind changes direction and the dust moves, things could go badly for everyone.
     
  18. Sep 28, 2018 at 3:53 AM
    #1038
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    That's a really good idea, as you say for a larger group or area.

    I did that a lot, especially when still living solo. Though one time I did step on and get stung by a scorpion while doing "night maneuvers" like that... I switched to very low intensity LED or EL lighting that raked the floor so I could see if there were any creepy crawlies around (they'd cast very long shadows if I put the lights practically right on the floor, usually underneath furniture so I wouldn't end up directly seeing the emitter). These days my feet are more likely to be taken out by a stray Lego.

    I'd never heard of or seen "dust lights" before. Totally makes sense for caravan travel though. Learn something new everyday, thanks!
     
  19. Sep 28, 2018 at 6:44 AM
    #1039
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    The key to dust lights is amber light. It cuts right through the dust far better than white lights or even the red of your brake lights. Invaluable in a group but seldom used elsewhere.
     
  20. Sep 28, 2018 at 11:12 AM
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    EDDO

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