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Diet Taco... trying to keep things light

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Builds (2005-2015)' started by DVexile, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. Oct 11, 2018 at 1:37 PM
    #1061
    scocar

    scocar Treat the cause, not the symptom

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    I hope it's not out of warranty after 1 month!

    It's isn't the frame. I initially thought that too, because there is a subtle arc upward in the middle bottom of the aluminum window frame, but the glass slides easier in this area. I've seen that same arc in pics of other Leer windoor sliders. The window channel all around has ample clearance from the glass. It is the rather robust rubber seals against the sides (think surface, not edge) of the glass that create the friction. These are at top and bottom and aligned in the direction of travel. Modest resistance. But when the glass nears being closed at the rear of the frame, the end area of rubber seal (think a new 3rd source of friction acting across the entire vertical glass surface), it encounters a dramatic increase in resistance just from the stiffness and orientation of the rubber. I don't a good pic to show it.
     
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  2. Oct 15, 2018 at 9:56 AM
    #1062
    PaulK

    PaulK Life is hard. It's harder if you're stupid.

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    I have a weight related issue to bring up. My truck didn’t come from the factory with the towing package, but the dealer had installed a Toyota trailer hitch with a 4-pin connector before I bought it. The hitch was showing some surface rust and the powder coating was beginning to peal in spots, so I pulled it of to clean it up this weekend. As expected, it was really heavy. I don’t currently have anything to tow, so I am considering just leaving it off until I do. If you have a towing package truck I think your hitch is different, and actually part of the bumper. Either way if you are not towing and never plan to, you might want to consider removing your hitch or putting a non-tow bumper on (whichever is applicable to your truck) and deleting the hitch altogether. One surprise that may be applicable to everyone is the fact that Toyota chose to put two small holes on the top of the hitch’s main 2” square tube to allow little plastic wire clips to be inserted. The wires acted like wicks and directed water right into the holes, and you guessed it – no bottom weep holes were included. The whole thing was full of rusty water. That’s a weight and corrosion issue that I intend to correct before putting it back on…if I ever do put it back on.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
    DVexile [OP] and Crom like this.
  3. Dec 12, 2018 at 10:04 AM
    #1063
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Mojave National Preserve
    November 2018

    This will be a quick report, I'm late and behind on reports!

    I've been in MNP for election week many times and it is now almost a tradition. Death Valley is occupied by 49ers this week usually and so since I like solitude it is a good time to explore MNP to the south. Other advantages of MNP are its proximity to my truck in Vegas and a number of hiking options at mid-altitudes for comfortable temps this time of the year.

    Flew in Monday morning, provisioned, early lunch at In & Out and then on the road out of town before noon. Clear skies forecast and near a new moon so I was hoping to get a lot of stargazing in. I've run myself a bit ragged in the past trying to get too much in on the first day so the only goal for Monday was to drive to a campsite under dark skies. Heading up a dirt road north from Kelso got me to a suitable spot where I set up camp.

    [​IMG]
    Camp Dark Sky
    I was trying out some new astronomy binoculars on this trip. There was a lot of experimenting with tripod mounting and what not in the evening and the early morning. Views of Orion's Sword, the Andromeda Galaxy, the Double Cluster and a number of other targets were amazing under the super dark skies. A little before sunrise Venus was almost blinding above the eastern horizon and the binoculars could actually resolve it as a tiny little crescent. Shortly after an extremely thin crescent moon rose which was a delight to observe though it was swimming in quite a bit of atmosphere that low on the horizon.

    As Tuesday got off to a real start I headed out for my first hike of the trip. Table Top Mountain has been on my list for a long while - almost hiked it years ago but weather intervened. There were quite a few cows around the trailhead and despite them looking curious and friendly I gave them a wide berth. Temps were wonderful and the hike started flat for awhile before eventually steeply climbing to a ridge. After a brief walk along the ridge there was another scramble up talus before getting to the "table" itself. Most of the top was burned a decade ago but along one edge juniper and even a pinyon or two have survived. I made a leisurely circumnavigation of the mesa stopping about midway for lunch. The feeling walking up there was other worldly with stands of burnt trees on one side with steep cliffs and endless miles of view on other.

    [​IMG]
    Table Top Mountain
    After descending from the table to the ridge Digonnet recommends returning to the trailhead via the ridge but I could see this would be a punishing boulder hopping adventure. I descended the way I came instead to find the same cows still milling about the trailhead. Since I took my time hiking it was already getting on into the afternoon so I returned to the same spot to camp. I spent a relaxing afternoon resting and reading so I'd have the energy to do some more binocular viewing that night.

    Wednesday was another beautiful day and I headed to Kessler Peak for another hike. This was done as a loop hike heading up a canyon and chute to get to the peak ridge. On the ridge I encountered a female bighorn sheep. As I stumbled to a sweaty stop to watch she essentially completed the rest of my hike in perhaps 45 seconds. I'd be another 10 minutes doing it myself. The peak offered delightful views and I had a lazy lunch on the top.

    [​IMG]
    Kessler Peak View
    Descending the north ridge of the peak was far more taxing than I had expected. It was very steep in a number of spots with heavy brush mixed in with large boulders. It did however offer a change of pace from the way up and its own impressive views. Completing the hike in the early afternoon I was ready to position myself for Thursday's hike. This would mean heading south of Baker which was a bit of a drive. The weather forecast was starting to turn rather windy so finding a sheltered camp seemed a good idea.

    I drove down to Cowhole Mountain to camp near the trailhead. I don't know if it was the light of the setting sun making things look worse but as soon as I looked at the route from the trailhead I said "no effing way am I doing that tomorrow". I think perhaps no effing way I'll ever do it. It looked like practically vertical talus almost the whole way.

    I sniffed around the south side of the adjacent Little Cowhole Mountain and found a spot that would be sheltered from the forecast north wind. I formed a backup plan for Thursday to explore and perhaps hike among the cinder cones. Then I opened the Flip Pac...

    Well one of the Bimini brackets that supports the tent frame had somehow pulled out of the fiberglass. The bracket being plastic it was also bent. This wouldn't be a major repair, in fact I might even be able to do it in the field. That said with the wind forecast for the next day I decided it might just be better to head back to Vegas in the morning and do the repair there with a Home Depot nearby and internet access for repair advice.

    And so Thursday morning I woke up quite early as I was still on east coast time and headed back to Vegas. I had a yummy breakfast at Cracker Barrel and then got the Flip Pac fixed along with some other mods to be documented in another post.

    All in all it was actually a great trip though not one to produce a particularly exciting trip report. I continue to be happily surprised with all my visits to Mojave National Preserve and I think I'll be back at about the same time next year.
     
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  4. Dec 12, 2018 at 4:27 PM
    #1064
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Quick Release Supports and Flip-Pac Repair
    November 2018

    As mentioned in the MNP trip report the Bimini bracket for part of the tent pulled out of the fiberglass.

    IMG_0766.jpg
    IMG_0769.jpg
    Now it just so happened for quite some time I've been meaning to replace the Bimini brackets on the Flip-Pac roof (when closed) / bed bottom (when open) so that I can store the supports in the cab rather than have them get ripped off by low hanging branches (already almost happened once). I've had the hardware for quite sometime. So long in fact that @inv3ctiv3 was able to acquire the same hardware, install it on his Flip-Pac and then sell his Flip-Pac for a GFC all while my brackets have sat in my "to-do" bag in my truck (this "to-do" bag is like a super miniature version of @scocar's shelves).

    So with a bent/broken plastic Bimini bracket on the inside of the Flip-Pac to replace it was a good time to remove the identical brackets from the outside of the Flip-Pac and use one as a replacement part while simultaneously completing my removable Flip-Pac support mod.

    Swapping the external plastic brackets with stainless quick release versions was very easy. Unscrew the old ones. Reuse one of the screw holes and mark the spot for the new hole. Drill new hole. Fill old hole with silicone. Glob silicone under the new QR bracket and install. Attach QR stubs to the supports.

    IMG_0770.jpg
    IMG_0773.jpg
    And that's all there is to the mod.

    Now with two replacement plastic brackets in hand I could repair the interior tent support. With some searching I of course found all sorts of suggestions on repairing a stripped screw hole in fiberglass with the right kind of epoxy and then drilling a new hole. This was what I assumed I was going to do and one reason I went back to Vegas early assuming I'd have to track down the correct fill epoxy.

    It turns out while searching for that I found that those ever resourceful and also typically newly poor boat owners have an alternative that is about as low cost as you can possibly imagine:

    IMG_0768.jpg
    Yep, those are the twist ties from my bread and hot dog buns. Apparently the metal in the twist tie ends up acting a bit like a self forming heli-coil and the plastic as thread lock. This was surprisingly secure once screwed in. Time will tell how long this holds but if some boat owners are to be believed it could last a long time. If it doesn't well then I'll track down the epoxy. Or get lazy and fill the old holes with silicone and move the bracket half an inch onto fresh fiberglass.

    I did all this work in a Home Depot parking lot but I never actually had to go inside. Turns out this could have entirely been a field repair if I had known of the twist tie trick.

    So in the end the Flip-Pac repair forced me to do a mod I've been meaning to do for over a year. And the whole thing took maybe 30 minutes tops. Decent way to end a trip...
     
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  5. Dec 12, 2018 at 4:42 PM
    #1065
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    I wonder if those plastic drywall anchors would act as a more "permanent" fix for the stripped holes in the flippac. They'd essentaily be doing the same thing as the plastic tie wrap you have there now- forming a mechanical bond by shrinking the size of the hole. I question the structural integrity of the epoxy repair on such a small scale because you're relying on the epoxy to hold the torsional load of the screws while also maintaining adhesion to the fiberglass. As opposed to f full scale fiberglass repair over a larger area where you're essentially building new structure. I know with the right epoxy a repair can be plenty strong, but also from my own personal experience of working at Home Depot for many years, they most likely don't sell the "right" epoxy.
     
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  6. Dec 12, 2018 at 5:41 PM
    #1066
    scocar

    scocar Treat the cause, not the symptom

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    You are cordially invited to take a seat on my trailer dolly.

     
  7. Dec 12, 2018 at 7:00 PM
    #1067
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    I very quickly established that I’d have to order the correct epoxy and wait for it to be shipped to me which is one of the reasons I did the twist tie trick. I like the drywall anchor idea! I think even with the correct epoxy what I’d do is fill the holes and shift the placement of the bracket slightly.
     
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  8. Dec 12, 2018 at 7:50 PM
    #1068
    dman100

    dman100 Well-Known Member

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    Hah, I always carry twist ties in my junk can in my truck, and even have a few in my mountain bike pack, but I’m not sure I’ve ever used them. And I sold my FlipPac several years ago :)
     
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  9. Dec 13, 2018 at 6:21 AM
    #1069
    Scott B.

    Scott B. Well-Known Member

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    Actually, HD probably does have the "right" kind of epoxy. A 2-part that will work on/with plastic should work just fine for this application.

    And, you can strengthen the current holes in one of two ways. The easy way is to coat the screw with a release agent (such as wax) then coat the screw with epoxy. Put the screw back in the hole, and let the epoxy cure. The stronger way, albeit slightly more difficult, is to drill out the hole slightly larger, and do the above. The additional epoxy will greatly increase the screw's gripping power.

    Yes, there are better epoxys to use (such as West System) but the home center variety would work in a pinch.

    And, I do not think drywall anchors will work properly in fiberglass. For those anchors to work properly, they expand. I think the expansion would work to fracture the fiberglass (the load being into the edge of the glass layers, as opposed to across them.) Also, the smooth hole would offer a minimal to none gripping surface to the anchor.

    My $0.02
     
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  10. Jan 9, 2019 at 12:29 PM
    #1070
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Death Valley - Part 1
    December 2018

    For a number of years I've spent a week in early December at the Saline Valley Hot Springs as it is a low visitation time. Sadly thanks to FB, IG and goodness knows what else the place is now overrun to the point of not being enjoyable at all to me anymore even in "low visitation" times. Inyo County hasn't helped at all by grading the road frequently...

    The silver lining though is that the rest of DV is still rather empty this time of the year and I'm now "forced" to go visit it rather than lay on my ass (or float rather) in SV. For this trip then my goal was to visit around the low elevations that are toasty the rest of the year as well as near the typically more crowded areas of the park.

    The trip began the usual way - up at 4AM in Baltimore headed to the airport and eventually on the road out of Vegas by noon with a provisioned truck and tummy full of In & Out. Since this was suppose to be a restful break I planned on doing nothing on Monday other than getting into the park and resting in camp. By mid-afternoon I'd found a spot along the Echo Canyon wash to pop open the Flip-Pac. In the evening I attempted to stargaze with a new telescope but that lasted all of twenty minutes before clouds from an approaching front obscured the sky. I did get to see a few delightful sights before that but alas this would be the last stargazing for the entire trip.

    Tuesday morning I decided to stop by the new Furnace Creek "Oasis" and try out the breakfast buffet before my hike for the day. It is rather expensive for what it is but it is of course in the middle of nowhere so that is to be expected. I was in no particular rush so I took my time reading and nibbling on stuff.

    From there it was an extremely short drive to the "trailhead" which doesn't actually exist other than parking at the side of the road. Here began a leisurely hour and a half walk up a broad wash through the same badlands strata as over by Zabriske. Given the low temps and partly cloudy skies it was quite enjoyable. I was glad to have a GPS to confirm parts of the route since it is often difficult to tell what exactly is the "main branch" of these really wide braided washes.

    Finally things began to narrow down and get shady. Once in the canyon there were two branches to explore. The branch to the left was known to be the most impressive so I started there. Wow - just WOW!

    [​IMG]
    Slots and Tunnels

    [​IMG]
    Desert Cathedral
    It is amazing that a place like this exists where the trailhead is right out of a popular campground and yet I would be the only person there this day. Apparently this place is a favorite of the park staff and so they do a good job of not advertising it but it does exist in more than one guidebook and more than one website. Hurray it isn't on FB or IG or any dumb ass "monetize your life" bullshit bane of this world antisocial media site yet and so there is still some peace and quiet to be found here. Let's all keep it that way, eh?

    This branch of the canyon included some minor climbs that were essentially through tunnels as well as one or two awkward climbing moves to be done but none of them with any serious exposure. It eventually became impassable at a huge sixty foot wall with a narrow three fluted dryfall. This wall was in fact a fault between two different strata and was really impressive. On the way back down I had a wonderful lunch inside a cool dark cathedral of rock.

    The right branch is much less interesting in comparison but would be a destination worth the hike by itself. It also had many interesting geologic features. There was also one extremely tight but short slot canyon branching off of it.

    Eventually it was time to head back out of the canyon and down the wash to my truck. This part of the hike was surprisingly delightful. A nice gradual downhill wash walk there were constantly sweeping views. For many parts one could pick a route right along the base of a mud hillside and be in the shade as well. The photo below doesn't really do it justice but gives a feel for how even the mundane part of the hike delivered.

    [​IMG]
    Death Valley Winter Stroll
    In all I hiked about 9.5 miles and really took my time to set an enjoyable pace and explore every little nook. This ranked as one of my very favorite hikes in all of the DV area and I felt a little dumb that I hadn't taken the time to do it until now!

    I spent the rest of the afternoon back in "camp" over in Echo Canyon. For me "camp" is just popping open the Flip-Pac. The clouds started to thicken as the afternoon wore on but there wasn't any rain forecast for the evening. I cooked an easy dinner and read before hitting bed early again.

    [​IMG]
    Echo Canyon "Camp"
    Wednesday morning dawned much the same as Tuesday and once again I headed over to the breakfast buffet because why the hell not. If I'm going to be right next to Furnace Creek might as well use it! I had a fairly mellow day planned as I wasn't sure how tiring the previous day's hike would be. Turned out to be pretty easy but I decided nothing wrong with a mellow day anyway.

    After breakfast I headed south along Badwater Road and then well to the south of Badwater itself parked along the side of the road. This hike was much shorter with less than about a mile from the road to where the canyon started to narrow. In not too long the walls became quite high and the canyon twisted with occasional massive rockfalls creating short tunnels. Not as impressive as Tuesday's hike but what an amazing payoff for a short jaunt from the road.

    [​IMG]
    Inside Room Canyon
    Eventually the canyon widened into a "room" that was fairly spectacular. The canyon continues above an easy to scramble up fall and is fairly entertaining but the main event really is nearer the start of this branch of the canyon just before the "room".

    On the way out I explored a side canyon slot I had seen on the way in. This slot was incredibly tight (I occasionally had to hold my tiny daypack over my head to fit through). Near the top it is possible to cross over a ridge and then hike back down another extremely tight slot and along the way see some impressive conglomerate pinnacles.

    Last stop on the way out was something I knew was there from reports but failed to notice on the way in. Two huge towers of conglomerate one of which looks a lot like the chimney in Panamint City.

    [​IMG]
    Chimneys
    This hike was short enough I was done well before lunch. I really had nothing else planned for the day so I headed on to my last camp for the trip. Thursday's hike would be much longer and so I wanted to position myself close to that hike. I took a leisurely drive down Harry Wade Road and in the end found the lowest impact place to setup camp was in the middle of the Amargosa River. Or rather its presently bone dry river bed. While reading and napping I felt two earthquakes both of which USGS reported as occuring over near Trona. Gave the truck and the Flip-Pac a good shake. At sunset I climbed a nearby hillside to take in the evening view. The sky was almost entirely cloudy but a few openings and thinner patches produced a soft all encompassing pink light.

    [​IMG]
    Amargosa Camp
    Virga swept from many of the clouds and the forecast was for light showers through the night. I hoped they would in fact be light showers as I hadn't bothered to put on the rain-fly. And so ended another delightful day in which I saw practically no one after leaving Furnace Creek. I had passed maybe five cars on Badwater Road and had not seen a soul all afternoon along Harry Wade Road. I was as it is said a pretty happy camper. As amazing as a trip as it had been so far it would be Thursday that would prove to be the highlight of it all.
     
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  11. Jan 9, 2019 at 1:09 PM
    #1071
    Crom

    Crom Outside

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    :) Outstanding! can't wait for more. :hungry: Thanks for taking the time.
     
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  12. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:31 PM
    #1072
    DVexile

    DVexile [OP] Exiled to the East

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    Death Valley - Part 2
    December 2018

    Thursday night there were some sprinkles as expected but they didn't amount to much and the fly-less Flip-Pac did fine with everything dry by morning. I wasn't sure how long the hike for the day would take so I woke early and ate a quick cold Pop-Tart breakfast. A short drive up the road got me to the starting point for the hike. As I got my pack ready the sun found a chink in the clouds.

    [​IMG]
    Smoke Tree Sunrise
    This was an auspicious sign as the sunlight was streaking right across the destination for the day. Hidden in those foothills in the distance were some recently discovered slot canyons. Named "Smoke Tree Slots" by the discoverer Steve Hall they were found after he scoured satellite photos for likely locations for slots and then made a trip to explore the area. They were only discovered in 2016. Kind of amazing that there are still things to be discovered in a National Park.

    The hike began with about a three mile walk across the valley floor and up the alluvial fan on the other side. The dry at present Amargosa is crossed along the way but depending on the time of year and precipitation one might get wet feet. It was a cool, cloudy morning and the hike across the empty valley floor was a delight. This was another hike I was glad to have GPS and satellite imagery for because one might easily end up in the wrong wash and waste a bit of time otherwise. I took a quick snack and water break halfway up the alluvial fan.

    The first stop would be Smoke Tree Slot 1 and its extremely narrow side canyon. As I got nearer I kept checking the GPS, map and satellite imagery and soon enough I came to a spot that matched Steve's photos and description. I had seen no human footprints at all but there were plenty of burro tracks around. A little giddy with excitement I entered the side canyon.

    [​IMG]
    Smoke Tree Slot 1 Side Canyon
    This slot was amazing and was nearly pitch black in spots. In a few locations I had to take my day pack off and hold it over my head. It ends at a steep dry fall that is also the very head of the side canyon. It forms a beautiful towering room with a bright skylight at the top. A light rain was beginning to fall outside and just a few drops were reaching the bottom through the opening at the top. Along the way I also found a dead raven that must have fallen into the slot and become too injured to get out. Just this one side canyon was worth the whole trip but even if it was the highlight it was just the beginning of fun discoveries throughout the day.

    As a side note most of my canyon photos from this trip feature me standing in them. This isn't because I like selfies but I've discovered it is impossible to interpret photos of these places without something to set the scale. A person is just the right thing to set the scale and since I'm solo there is only one person to feature. These photos can be a bit challenging to setup when solo especially if you don't want a lot of tripod weight with you. I hike with a very compact m43 camera (the GM1) and I pack an extremely compact but also short tripod that uses folding tent poles for legs. With a little patience and ingenuity I can often find a way to perch the camera for a good composition. Here is the setup for the photo above:

    [​IMG]
    Rube Goldberg takes a selfie
    Also worth noting the lighting level in the above photo is much closer to what the eye perceived when in the slot - it was quite dark. The first photo is a long exposure that is brighter to show more detail of the canyon walls. I'm actually not going to post too many photos from this hike because it really is a place to explore and discover on your own.

    Exiting the side canyon I proceeded up the main canyon with has a nice narrows of its own but not a tight slot at all. It is shortly blocked by a dry fall which can be easily bypassed by hiking back down to the mouth of the canyon. The top of the dry fall can be easily visited from the bypass. The upper region of the canyon is a fun little walk and eventually enters the decomposing granite of the Owlshead Mountains. At about this point it was time to jump the ridge to the south to enter Smoke Tree Slot 2.

    The ridge itself is a treat (almost everything on this hike is a treat) as there are granite outcroppings with delightful alcoves much like the Alabama Hills. One little cave near the top looked like a particularly inviting spot for a rest and a snack out of the off-again on-again sprinkles. It was really hard not to imagine a shaman living here. The view was awesome and the opening faces to the north meaning this must be a cool respite in warmer months.

    [​IMG]
    Shaman's Cave
    With only one slot canyon down and two more to go it was time to move on. I descended into the top of Smoke Tree Slot 2. This canyon has a entirely different character. The walls aren't particularly tall nor the canyon all that narrow but the walls are something else. Deeply incised strata with lots of holes where cobbles have fallen out make it feel like you are walking around a tidal area in Northern California. The narrows are also substantial in length being about 1/3 mile long.

    [​IMG]
    Namesake Resident
    Exiting the bottom of Smoke Tree Slot 2 it was time to cross the mouth of Great Dry Fall Canyon to reach the last slot of the day. Sprinkles were more frequent now but only enough to make the desert come alive with the scent of creosote bushes. An inversion layer due to the weather was making sound travel very far and so I was frequently serenaded by rapid cannon fire from the Ft. Irwin ranges well to the south as I walked.

    Soon enough I got to Smoke Tree Slot 3. Much like the first canyon this one also features a very tight side canyon which was a delight to explore. The main canyon itself is longer and narrower than STS1 and has its own unique character.

    [​IMG]
    Smoke Tree Slot 3
    The sprinkles were a bit more persistent by now so I found a nice overhang mid-canyon to have my lunch under. This was the end of the sights for the hike and I reflected on what an amazing discovery Steve Hall has made here. I've been exploring Death Valley for more than twenty years off and on but this was a pretty amazing day for me.

    Eventually it was time to head back to the truck. I always enjoy some of these longer walks across a valley. Seeing a tiny white dot in the distance and knowing it was warm, dry and full of yummy treats is a good motivator. A few light showers blew over along the way and I was glad to have my hiking umbrella with me. It was hard to stop grinning about this trip. I had spent 24 hours without seeing a soul, did a hike to an amazing place I've never been before and didn't see a single human foot print. This was way better than soaking in hot springs listening to other people share their musical tastes with the surrounding 100 square miles while being accosted with bizarre conspiracy theories from all and sundry.

    The sprinkles were slowly transitioning to more insistent rain as drove up Harry Wade Road. One nice thing about rain in the desert is that it really brings out the colors in rocks and soils. I often forget that Artist's Palette is actually just a particularly brilliant accent of a whole mountain range of color that is misleading named the Black Mountains. If the geographers got the name wrong at least the geologists got it right when they named the formation the Amargosa Chaos.

    [​IMG]
    Southern "Black" Mountains
    Eventually I hit the pavement and started the drive back to Vegas through the showers. This had definitely been one of the best trips for me in awhile. As usual all it really did was make me anxious to come back again soon!
     
    SIZZLE, jubei, ETAV8R and 10 others like this.
  13. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:42 PM
    #1073
    turbodb

    turbodb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Member:
    #177696
    Messages:
    2,672
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tacoma Xcab 4x4 SR5 V6 TRD
    AdventureTaco
    Love it, kudos! I have a new appreciation for slot canyons after a recent trip down to Grand Staircase-Escalante, where we got to explore (just barely) a few of the slots there. Excited to hear that there are some in DV as well - just adds to the long list of reasons to return!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Jan 11, 2019 at 3:37 PM
    #1074
    dman100

    dman100 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Member:
    #180009
    Messages:
    1,174
    Central Coast, California
    Vehicle:
    2016 TRD OR DCSB
    I crawled around in some slot canyons at Painted Canyon, south and west of Palm Springs in November. Lots of fun but also a little disorienting. A few spots there where the backpack had to come off and some hands and knees too.
     
    Crom and DVexile [OP] like this.
  15. Jan 17, 2019 at 9:23 AM
    #1075
    2Toyotas

    2Toyotas Vintage Camp Stove Collector

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2016
    Member:
    #204565
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    1,521
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ken
    Western NC
    Vehicle:
    '13 Taco AC SR5 4x4 - '95 T100 AC SR5 4x4 280K+
    DVexile [OP] and ETAV8R like this.
  16. Jan 17, 2019 at 11:48 AM
    #1076
    Mtnflyer

    Mtnflyer I'm big in Japan

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2015
    Member:
    #158366
    Messages:
    5,136
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Matt
    Las Vegas
    Hey Ken, Sorry I missed you for beers back in Sept. Hit me up next time you're through and I'll buy. :cheers:
     
    DVexile [OP] likes this.

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