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different sized rear and front tires.

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by ekapec, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:21 PM
    #1
    ekapec

    ekapec [OP] Well-Known Member

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    So I just got studded tires put on my prerunner, but only on the back. I currently have 245/75/r16 on the front but 235/75/r16 on the back.

    I just did a 3.5 hour drive and noticed signifigant loss on gas....did I make a poor choice? Anyone know of any other drawbacks for my choice?
     
  2. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:26 PM
    #2
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    Personally, I think the Tacoma is geared too low to begin with so going with smaller tires would just make the engine scream at highway speeds. If you're looking at this soley from the perspective of highway MPGs, then yes, you made a poor choice. If you're looking at it overall, you'll get slightly better acceleration in the snow/ice and might notice some better in town MPG. Personally, I'd have gone with studded snows all around. Putting them just on the back isn't the best idea. You need the front end to have grip for steering and stopping.
     
  3. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:31 PM
    #3
    ekapec

    ekapec [OP] Well-Known Member

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    thanks, they weren't too bad on the highways but I didn't have the money for all four. They were used and I got them for trading in my old snow tires from my nissan xe. Im planning on getting all seasons, 265's come april when studs are illegal to have.
     
  4. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:41 PM
    #4
    jandrews

    jandrews Carolina Alliance Southwest Region Ambassador

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    Tire size affects effective gearing ratio of the differentials and transmission. With a manual tranny you can compensate some by altering your shift points. If it's an automatic you're going to see your highway mileage drop off a bit by having smaller tires on the driven axle.
     
  5. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:52 PM
    #5
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    Just be careful in MA only having studs on the rear. The issue you can have is having too much traction in the rear and having the rear tires drive you through a corner (meaning they just push the front end straight forward instead of turning).
     
  6. Dec 30, 2012 at 6:55 PM
    #6
    skytower

    skytower Well-Known Member

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    If that happens, you are going too fast for conditions. Matching tires are the best bet. The best tires should be on the rear, if you can't match them.
     
  7. Dec 30, 2012 at 7:00 PM
    #7
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    I've heard that one other time but I really disagree. I can at least somewhat follow the logic for a front-drive car but not for a rear drive pickup. I know they say put the better tires on the rear so the back end doesn't step out but I firmly believe that you're better off being able to stop and steer vs. being able to accelerate. :notsure:
     
  8. Dec 30, 2012 at 7:55 PM
    #8
    jandrews

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    I'm with Dave. If you can't stop or steer because it's slippery out, which set of tires you have on the front doesn't make a shit. You're drivin' to hairball for the weather.
     
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