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Electric Fan power increase

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas' started by Rons01TRD, Jul 7, 2014.

  1. Jul 7, 2014 at 8:58 AM
    #1
    Rons01TRD

    Rons01TRD [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I was just wondering how much the power gain would be by replacing my clutch fan with a Flex-a-Light dual electric fan? It made a huge difference on my 94' with the 22RE 4 cylinder engine. Has anybody tried this?
     
  2. Jul 7, 2014 at 12:00 PM
    #2
    se7enine

    se7enine Well-Known Member

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    1 HP?
     
  3. Jul 7, 2014 at 2:11 PM
    #3
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 ASE Master Tech Vendor

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    There will possible be a small amount, but I doubt you would see any significant changes. See, you will lose the engine drag of the blades driven by the engine, but will add engine drag from the alternator having to generate the 20-30 amps or so that an electric fan will draw.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2014 at 2:33 PM
    #4
    presto

    presto Well-Known Member

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    Look at build thread
    subbed, curious of what the outcome of this discussion will be.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2014 at 2:41 PM
    #5
    2000GTacoma

    2000GTacoma Well-Known Member

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    Even with a bigger alternator, I believe the increased load on the engine would still be about the same. 20-30 amps as Bamatoy said is still 20-30 amps regardless of the size alternator I would think. I could be wrong.
     
  6. Jul 7, 2014 at 2:50 PM
    #6
    vbibi

    vbibi Well-Known Member

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    I think the question is, how about the better (or improved) cooling?
     
  7. Jul 7, 2014 at 2:58 PM
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    Indy

    Indy Master of all I survey.

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    9v battery or the hoover dam, doesn't matter. It will still take the same number of amps to turn the fan, it will take the same amount of power to generate those amps. A larger alt will just be able to generate more amperage.

    A clutch fan is basically free-wheeling at freeway speeds and usually only engages at low speeds when heat is really soaking the engine compartment. It isn't taking any real power to turn when its freewheeling. It would be an improvement over a 1:1 fan found in older cars where even a flex fan gave a little bit of help, but in newer cars... maybe an extra mile per tank. Total guess on the #.
     
  8. Jul 7, 2014 at 3:09 PM
    #8
    lipster

    lipster Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna say that when Big T designed the Taco, they were well aware of electric radiator fans, and for some reason they opted for the (I believe) more expensive viscous fan. Don't know the reason, but there has to be one.
     
  9. Jul 7, 2014 at 3:14 PM
    #9
    maineah

    maineah Well-Known Member

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    745.7 watts per hp 25 amp fan 317.5 watts @12.7 volts how much does a clutch fan need when it's in free wheel? Hard question doubt if it's worth the effort.
     
  10. Jul 7, 2014 at 6:00 PM
    #10
    StAndrew

    StAndrew Wait for it...

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    All depends on the efficiency of the blades on the new fan. With the OEM fan, you can pretty much assume %100 of the engine power is transered directly to the fan. With the E-Fan, you lose efficiency when you transfer mechanical power into electrical power (alternator) and again when you reverse the process (fan motor). If the increased blade efficiency makes up for the lost engergy, you may see a difference.

    You can argue a more efficient alternator can help tip the scales, but it will give just as much an advantage with the OEM fan :notsure:
     
  11. Jul 7, 2014 at 9:50 PM
    #11
    Indy

    Indy Master of all I survey.

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    Yep, companies spend MILLIONS in finding parts that give the best bang. They dont intentionally not use a $5 part that actually makes a difference. Its hard to actually improve on the engine as a whole. You can improve hp, but it costs a lot and reduces other factors. You can improve mpg, but it costs a lot and reduces other factors.

    I throw money at car all the time with the 100% expectation that im throwing money at itand nothing else.
     
  12. Jul 8, 2014 at 4:23 AM
    #12
    maineah

    maineah Well-Known Member

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    Alternators only put out what is needed if it's a 130 amp alternator that is its max output and most likely is never reached in normal driving. Running the A/C head lights, charging the truck and a camper battery still would come short of 130 amps but the reserve is there. Electric fans are used a lot there most common use is in front drive vehicles because they cannot use a belt driven fan to cool the engine the other use is in some type of racing setup with remote mounted radiators. In my opinion at best it would be a tossup between a belt drive and electric fan so I would opt. for the belt drive for simplicity and longevity.
     
  13. Jul 8, 2014 at 6:06 AM
    #13
    Rons01TRD

    Rons01TRD [OP] Well-Known Member

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    It was just a question on my part. My 94" Toyota Extra Cab 4X4 had the 22RE and after the header, exhaust and electric fan it made quite a difference but that motor was weak for that model truck. My 82' Toyota had the 22R and it was sufficient for the regular cab 4X4.

    IMO my truck is sluggish accelerating from a stop and was wondering if the load of the fan would make a difference on acceleration for a cheap upgrade.

    Thanks for the replies.:)
     
  14. Jul 8, 2014 at 7:11 AM
    #14
    JAGER91374

    JAGER91374 Well-Known Member

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    Electric fans on the tacoma really doesn't make a whole lot of difference. My buddy swapped his for a Taurus electric a few years back. Made no difference in the way the truck drove or mileage.

    The one benifit was that he wired in a manual switch so he could turn on the fan anytime he liked. Since he lives out west and he likes to run the trails in the desert he liked the fact that he had that control.
     
  15. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:06 AM
    #15
    StAndrew

    StAndrew Wait for it...

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    Whats cheap? Ive been wanting to do this, just for the ability to control on/off/speed, etc... but the price tag has been a bit too high for me to justify :notsure:. If you have a cheap solution that effective, Im all ears ;)

    This is what Ive been looking at but its about the same cost as a new bumper :notsure:

    http://www.amazon.com/Flex-lite-680-Toyota-Electric/dp/B000FKBR1Q

    http://www.amazon.com/Flex-A-Lite-3...832346&sr=1-5&keywords=Flex-a-lite+controller
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  16. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:09 AM
    #16
    Rons01TRD

    Rons01TRD [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Anything with improvements that are way cheaper than a turbo or S/C install.:anonymous:
     
  17. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:21 AM
    #17
    StAndrew

    StAndrew Wait for it...

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    Not when you calc HP/$$$ ratio :p

    As Linwood says, buy once, cry once... :cool:

    Speaking of which, you can cut and stamp metal in your shop? Im still trying to find a new mounting solution for this damn IC.
     
  18. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:25 AM
    #18
    Rons01TRD

    Rons01TRD [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Might have something here that will already work, got any measurements?
     
  19. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:29 AM
    #19
    Lurkin

    Lurkin Well-Known Member

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    I installed the Flex-a-lite single fan Tacoma kit about 4 years ago. I noticed no power or mpg affects (+ or -). I did gain the loss :) of the startup fan roar and the cold engine roar, also when driving in town, the e-fan engagement vs. the clutch fan engagement was a bit less intrusive. I ended up replacing the stock e-fan controller with an upgraded 2-stage controller, as the 2-stage makes the e-fan engagement almost unnoticeable.

    I do like my e-fan and will be keeping it on, but in hind-sight it's hard to justify the $500 ($400 efan + $100 2stage controller) spent on it.
     
  20. Jul 8, 2014 at 8:51 AM
    #20
    RdRunr

    RdRunr Well-Known Member

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    If you need to spin a fan, the most efficient way to do it is to have the engine run it. Using an electric fan is going to have loses in the alternator and the motor. So, an engine-driven fan will use less power than an electric.

    BUT, most of the time you don't need a fan! On my last truck ('98 F-150) I put in an electric fan and added an LED on the dash so I knew when it was running. It rarely turned on. As long as I was moving, enough air was forced through the radiator to keep things cool. The fan would only come on if going too slow on a really hot day or if completely stopped too long. So, an electric fan will use more power when it's running, but it won't be running very often. That is where you may gain a little.

    Let's do some math! :eek: I had a single, 16" fan on my old truck. It draws 11 A at 14 V, that would be 154 W or 0.21 HP. Hmmm, that's less than I thought it would be. An engine-driven fan uses not more more than zero when disengaged. No idea how much it uses when fully engaged.

    As for the cost, the fan is now selling for $158. I think the controller was around $30. And then a few dollars more for a switch and LED (I like control!)
     
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