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Flash Photography

Discussion in 'Photography' started by dysfunctnlretard, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. Mar 22, 2010 at 11:56 PM
    #1
    dysfunctnlretard

    dysfunctnlretard [OP] Hi

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    Anybody got any tips on how the fuck I use this thing? LOL

    Ive been using an DSLR for years for any events I go to, whether it be offroading, family events, or vacations, we all know the pics come out better. I got a new XSI like 10 days ago and Im loving it and decided to buy a flash for it too. I skimped out on a flash on my last SLR but it really held me back from taking decently nice night shots. I bought myself a 430EX II and this shit is hella confusing. Any tips? I usually shoot in shutter or aperture priority depending on whats going on. If I really have time to setup my shots I'll go full manual.
     
  2. Mar 23, 2010 at 8:47 AM
    #2
    ocabj

    ocabj Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry about manual flash right now.

    Canon's have E-TTL/E-TTL II to make things easier, so just rely on it for now.

    Just start shooting by controlling the flash head position (bouncing and diffusing) and using the FEC.

    Here's a good free resource on Canon Flash:

    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=138907

    I'm still playing around with off-camera flash myself after buying some new PocketWizards.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Mar 23, 2010 at 8:58 AM
    #3
    DavidT

    DavidT D

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    try bouncing flash off ceilings or walls. try a diffuser also
     
  4. Mar 24, 2010 at 2:45 PM
    #4
    dysfunctnlretard

    dysfunctnlretard [OP] Hi

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    Cool. Thanks for the link. Helped a bit.

    Yea I got that concept pretty well, including the fact that I should increase flash power when bouncing since light is spread out in the room rather than focused on a subject. I guess my real concern is manual mode. I don't like the idea of not knowing how my flash works and perhaps missing the opportunity to create some cool effects in manual mode. How fast can I shoot with my flash? I have high shutter speed sync on the flash but I thought max speed with any flash is 1/200-250sec?
     
  5. Mar 28, 2010 at 7:18 AM
    #5
    kraaazymike

    kraaazymike Well-Known Member

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    If you want to use manual mode, your shutter speed controls ambient light and your aperture controls your overall exposure. If you want your background dark, set your shutter speed to your max sync speed (which I think is 200 on your body). With ETTLII your flash will usually expose your subject correctly. If you want your background lighter, just open the shutter longer. For anything slower than 1/60 and a moving subject, use second curtain sync to get the blurs correctly.

    If you want your flash to be in manual, the shutter and aperture are as mentioned. Use but you should fire test shots at your subject and look at your histogram and adjust your flash output or aperture accordingly.

    You can shoot as fast as your flash can recharge. On new AA's it's rate at 3 sec recharge at full power. After that it depends on how good your batteries are and what power you're shooting.

    And max sync speed is determined by your body, not the flash. A flash duration is ~1/1000 sec. It has to do with the shutter curtains and how they work. Use High Speed Sync for anything above 1/200. Just know that your flash GN will drop as it's producing several smaller flashes as opposed to one single solid flash.

    Practice practice practice!
     
  6. Jun 5, 2010 at 11:53 PM
    #6
    Unknown

    Unknown He who angers you conquers you

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    SHot my friend using a reflector. (No Homo)


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