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Flushed transmission today

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Tacologist, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. Oct 13, 2011 at 8:41 PM
    #1
    Tacologist

    Tacologist [OP] Well-Known Member

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    First Name:
    Bob
    Tenessee
    Vehicle:
    05 Double Cab Shortbed
    Rear leaf suspension. Home done tailgate re-inforcement.
    Lousy rainy day for golf so I figured at 60K it would be a good time to do the transmission flush. I don't buy that 100K change crap even though I don't tow or off road it. I feel 100K is the extreme upper limit.

    I already bought the WS fluid so I printed up a few pages from http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/2nd-gen-tacomas/68462-diy-full-flush-automatic-transmission.html

    Which was a great write up but when it came to the part that told us to put the truck on a level surface before checking the fluid level, I questioned that a bit.

    The transmission pan itself sits slightly skewed lower at the rear than the front. I wonder if that is the proper way to set it up for the fluid level setting? With the 4 leaf spring TSB, the truck is a bit higher at the back than it was with the 3 leaf originals.

    When done at the dealer, the truck is often lifted on a hydraulic lift by the frame. Using a bubble level there is a difference between the angle of the pan and the frame members.

    When on the wheels on a level surface, the pan is lower at the back than the front even with the 4 leaf springs.

    So what is the actual proper way to do it and does it make that much difference?

    I compromised by trying to reach a happy medium between a level surface and a level pan. So far nothing has blown up.

    The rest of the write up was pretty easy to follow and mechanically it made sense. You are pumping out the old stuff from the torque converter and the cooler while adding new fluid to the pan at least twice. I used about 10.5 quarts of fluid when all was said and done.
     
  2. Oct 13, 2011 at 8:54 PM
    #2
    I Liquid I

    I Liquid I Well-Known Member

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    I was going to do this myself... but I think I will just take it to dealer. Actually go an appointment for this Monday. What I am unsure about though, is if I want them to flush it or just drain and refill. It about $80.00 difference. I think I just want them to drain and refill and change the filter. I do not really want other peeps transmission fluid to run through my bulletproof (up to now) transmission, if that is the way they flush it anyhow.
     
  3. Oct 17, 2011 at 11:59 AM
    #3
    I Liquid I

    I Liquid I Well-Known Member

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    Seems what I had posted was pretty wrong. In the flush they do not flush it like they do engines. They just flush the old fluid out. I tried to get this service done. I cannot get it anywhere. What a pain... I will probably end up doing it like you did following that same write up.
     
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