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Fox Life!!! Anything Related to Fox Suspension

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by ThaiChillyTaco, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. Sep 6, 2020 at 11:42 AM
    #2641
    ConcreteTRD

    ConcreteTRD Member

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    Anyone know where to get mounting hardware for 2.5 coilovers? I purchased a used set and I'm missing one bolt but thought getting all new would probably be best.

    I've Googled but no luck. Wanted to check here before I start calling around.
    IMG_20200904_152316__01.jpg IMG_20200904_141817.jpg
     
  2. Sep 6, 2020 at 11:57 AM
    #2642
    kbp810

    kbp810 Well-Known Member

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    I would head to a local ace hardware, take one of the existing bolts with you to match them up. I would go with a grade 8 if standard, grade 10.9 (or 12.9 if they have it) if metric.
     
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  3. Sep 6, 2020 at 6:20 PM
    #2643
    Tacompa

    Tacompa Well-Known Member

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    @cmbondo Thanks this was helpful.

    If I understood it correctly for my type of coilovers I should not exceed 21" of compressed height. (Center of shock mount eyelet to top hat)

    What's not clear is how I would know how much to crank the collar up or down.

    Do I take a measurement of the current compressed height of the coilovers and the exposed threads above the collar. Then I either subtract or add the desired amount?

    For example if I'm at 23.5" hub to fender and want to reduce the height to 23.00", then I reduce the exposed threads by 0.5"?


    Or is it trial and error until you get to the desired height?
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2020
  4. Sep 6, 2020 at 6:30 PM
    #2644
    cmbondo

    cmbondo Well-Known Member

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    FOX 2.5 DSC and some other stuff too.
    It's trial and error as it's going to be different on every truck due to differing weight distribution. But a good starting point in not to exceed 27 exposed threads on the coilovers. An estimate is about 8 threads for each inch of lift on a stock truck. Now if you have anything other than the 13 inch 600 lbs coils or lots of weight than all that is out the window. And of course at the end be aware of the 21 inch max length. Good luck.
     
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  5. Sep 6, 2020 at 8:26 PM
    #2645
    Tacompa

    Tacompa Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, not the answer I was hoping for! :( But oh well!

    I have 14" 650 lb springs and I'm currently sitting at 23.5" ride height hub to fender. This will be my third time adjusting the coilovers. Luckily I have access to a lift and strut compression tool.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2020
  6. Sep 6, 2020 at 8:41 PM
    #2646
    cmbondo

    cmbondo Well-Known Member

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    FOX 2.5 DSC and some other stuff too.
    If you have the 2.5s, they can be adjusted on the truck with the front end off the ground. I've done it numerous times as have others on here.
     
  7. Sep 7, 2020 at 12:01 AM
    #2647
    Tacompa

    Tacompa Well-Known Member

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    I do have the 2.5 with dsc.

    Does it take a lot of effort to turn the collar by just lifting the truck off the ground? I'm worried about having enough space to work with under there. Any suggestions on how to make it easier?
     
  8. Sep 7, 2020 at 1:36 AM
    #2648
    bludweiaer

    bludweiaer Well-Known Member

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    avs rain guards,,,tyger auto tubesteps... stealth SR8's.265/70/17,ridge grapplers..shiftsense pro...
    5/16 punch... wd40... short pipe to put over punch for leverage, pretty easy, with truck lifted, easy to get at even with tire on..
     
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  9. Sep 7, 2020 at 7:04 AM
    #2649
    cdex8357

    cdex8357 “Going Soft til I Go Hard”

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    Mid travel FOX 2.5 Coilovers FOX 2.5 secondary bypass FOX 12” Triple Bypass
    Can be done on truck but I still like to compress the coil. This way you don’t damage the preload nut.
     
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  10. Sep 10, 2020 at 11:57 AM
    #2650
    RedHeadedStepside

    RedHeadedStepside Active Member

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    This is a bit of a sketchy hack: With the truck on the ground, I used a ratchet strap (common 1500lb break force strap) and made 4 passes from the bottom to the top of the spring. I evenly spaced them at 12oclock,3,6,and 9. I attached the ratchet with some padding behind it to protect the spring and just tightened it enough for some tension. Then I jacked up the truck from the front. With the weight of the truck now off of the springs, and the straps holding it compressed, I was able to turn the collar with no effort at all. Sketchy but I didn't have a compressor and was ok with the math. Say the spring is held by the strap at 2" of compression, this means there is 1200 lbs. of force in the spring (for a 600 lb./in spring). Each section of the strap would see about 150 lbs. (4 loops=8 sections in tension)

    It's a PITA to weave the straps in there, but I was giving myself a hernia trying to turn the collar without...
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
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  11. Sep 10, 2020 at 3:33 PM
    #2651
    cmbondo

    cmbondo Well-Known Member

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    FOX 2.5 DSC and some other stuff too.
    It's interesting to hear everyone else's experience with adjusting the preload on the truck. I can lift it off the ground, slightly loosen the allen bolt and turn the preload nut without any significant effort. I mean you need a little muscle but I'm a small guy and can do it no problem. No cheater bar or lube, just the 5/16 punch. And no damage whatsoever to the preload nut. I guess there should be a disclaimer, "Individual results may vary."
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
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  12. Sep 10, 2020 at 3:57 PM
    #2652
    RedHeadedStepside

    RedHeadedStepside Active Member

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    Yeah, before the strap idea, I didn't have a punch but found a beefy flat head screwdriver that was a bit too fat. It was a nice strong screwdriver. I cut off the end and I grinded the shaft down down just enough to fit smoothly in the spanner wrench holes on the ring. It was nice to have the plastic handle and about 10" of lever arm. It was turning but I was having to brace myself on the sliders with one hand to get a good pull with the other. I made it about two turns before my ghetto tool broke right in half. Ratchet straps to the rescue!
     
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  13. Sep 10, 2020 at 4:14 PM
    #2653
    cdex8357

    cdex8357 “Going Soft til I Go Hard”

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    I still suggest compressing the coil. This is the damage I am talking about, deforming the hole in the preload nut. They are about 50$ each. 64C551C5-833D-470C-B05C-4473C5BC6EF0.jpg

    yes everyone has different results. And whatever works for you
     
  14. Sep 10, 2020 at 6:00 PM
    #2654
    RedHeadedStepside

    RedHeadedStepside Active Member

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    Let's nerd out for a minute and look at triangles. The relationship between the shock adjustment to actual lift is pretty close to this powerpoint masterpiece. The distance from the lower control arm pivot point to the lower eyebolt (A) divided by the distance from the pivot point of the lower control arm to the tire center (B) is the same ratio as the change in shock height (X) divided by the change in lift (Y). It's not exact but it's definitely not 1:1. Adjusting your shock 0.5" won't get you 0.5" of lift. I rudely measured my truck and it seems the distance A is about half of distance B.

    I'd go for 0.25" of shock height will get you 0.5" of lift as a guess. But forget all this, it's mostly trial and error.
    upload_2020-9-10_17-49-28.jpg
     
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  15. Sep 10, 2020 at 6:22 PM
    #2655
    RangerComa

    RangerComa 58008

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    It’s generally accepted that it’s a 2:1 ratio like you nerded out on. Kudos. And thank you. :cheers:
     
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  16. Sep 11, 2020 at 8:00 AM
    #2656
    cdex8357

    cdex8357 “Going Soft til I Go Hard”

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    Nice math..
     
  17. Sep 11, 2020 at 1:54 PM
    #2657
    RangerComa

    RangerComa 58008

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    No. Preload is a reference to the weight of the vehicle forcing the spring down. Different vehicles weigh different amounts, so preload is unique to everyone’s specific truck, although there are a few common setups that will be similar to yours. So you’ll have to install and adjust, using the 2:1 ratio as a guide, not as a precision predictor.
     
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  18. Sep 11, 2020 at 2:29 PM
    #2658
    Tacompa

    Tacompa Well-Known Member

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    Do you happen to have a pic of how you used the straps?
     
  19. Sep 11, 2020 at 3:38 PM
    #2659
    RedHeadedStepside

    RedHeadedStepside Active Member

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    I didn't take a pic on the truck but I snapped a few pics using my old 5100s/oem coil. I didn't use the hooks but I looped the long strap through where the short strap is connected to the ratchet and tied a figure 8 knot (top pic). I fed the free end of the long strap 4 passes around the outermost coils (second pic), in through the top, and out through the bottom. Then I fed that free end into the ratchet, put some foam behind it to protect the shiny fox coils. I tried to make it so my figure 8 knot was was inside the spring, about halfway between the top and bottom coils to avoid any hang-ups on the knot. I made sure the straps were all free of any twists as well. You want the straps to smoothly slide as if the coils were acting like pulleys (Pullies?:notsure:). This might not work so well if the fox springs weren't smooth AF. As you tighten it, you should see all of the straps moving together. I only tightened mine enough to remove any slack. I slowly raised the truck and could see the spring stayed compressed and had about a 0.5" gap to the top hat. I wanted to adjust more than that so I lowered it back down and gave the ratchet a few cranks and lifted back and it had more gap. I could just grab the collar and spin it by hand after loosening the pinch bolt. I used a tool anyway and made sure to keep my fingers clear of the spring in case the strap failed. Did I mention it was sketchy?

    On the second side of the truck, i didn't have good strap spacing so the spring did a slight banana thing. Watch out for that. Make sure the spring is seated properly before bringing the truck back down. Or, in the amount of time it takes you to read this, you could go buy/rent some legit spring compressors. I tried that at first but the ones from autozone are too fat to fit between the coils.
    upload_2020-9-11_15-3-52.jpg
     
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  20. Sep 11, 2020 at 3:55 PM
    #2660
    Tacompa

    Tacompa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, its always good to have a plan B.
     
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