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Gen 3 Towing Thread

Discussion in '3rd Gen. Tacomas (2016+)' started by TacoJonn, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. Oct 13, 2021 at 11:49 AM
    #1701
    Steadfast

    Steadfast Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    Member:
    #184952
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    First Name:
    Thane
    S.W. Ontario Canada
    Vehicle:
    2013 Limited
    My Tab400 is over 3500lbs loaded. No WDH or sway control. Truck bed loaded with extra water, firewood, generator and other gear.
    No sag.
    These trucks don’t have enough springs in them to hold any load. They are made for comfort. Lol.

    EE40E537-788E-4089-B654-B9937918678B.jpg
     
    grogie likes this.
  2. Oct 13, 2021 at 12:49 PM
    #1702
    deusxanime

    deusxanime Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2017
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    #223889
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    1,520
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    MN
    Vehicle:
    2020 Cement OR DCSB V6 6MT 4x4 Prem+AdvTech+LED
    I brought my Apex Nano 208BHS camper trailer (around 4000lb dry) in to get new tires a couple days ago, and since it was a short drive of only about 10 minutes to get to Discount Tire, I thought I'd be lazy and see how it does without the weight-distributing/sway bars on. I didn't want to have to go down-up-down before and after to get the bars on as my hitch lift is slow as molasses, and I expected I'd have to move it around or back it in to a spot there for them to work on it, which was true, and that would also require me to remove and then reinstall the bars as well.

    I have stock suspension EXCEPT I replaced my stock bump stops with the black SumoSprings. I've put the camper on with all its weight in the past before the Sumos and it sagged like crazy. It looked nearly bottomed out in the back and the front way up of course. Using the WDH with bars does completely solve this problem when it's used and even with the stock suspension it was level after hooking up, just to point that out.

    BUT with the SumoSprings in there now, I was able to fully put the weight of the camper on my hitch with no WD bars and only had a very minimal amount of sag in the rear. I drove it down to DT and it behaved very well. There was a bit of wind and I could definitely feel more sway though in the trailer. Nothing unsafe, but a definite difference. On normal trips I'll definitely still use the full WDH with the anti-sway bars connected to make sure it is very good and level and help with wind/sway, but it is nice to be able to do quick connect and disconnects and move it around (need to remove them anyway for backing up and tight turns) and very short trips without having to go through the full pain of getting all that connected.

    If you don't want to do a full suspension change, swapping springs and shocks, then getting bump stop replacements is a nice compromise that is very easy to do. I used SumoSprings, but I think there are also Timbrens and a couple other brands. The initial swap from stock bump stop to SumoSprings was pretty quick and easy and then I just checked the torque on the u-bolts a couple times after putting a couple hundred miles on it. (Don't skip re-checking your torque on those, they definitely loosen up! I ended up re-torquing them twice and by the third time they were holding steady.)
     
    dubschweezy and mosccat like this.
  3. Oct 13, 2021 at 1:28 PM
    #1703
    New2You

    New2You Member

    Joined:
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    Portland, OR
    Vehicle:
    2017 4x4 DCSB OR Black
    @dubschweezy So yeah, your tongue should be between 240 - 480 (480 being the max when fully loaded at 3200). The truck can def. do that, your hitch may add another 100. weight dist should put you right where you want to be
     
    dubschweezy likes this.
  4. Oct 13, 2021 at 2:28 PM
    #1704
    mosccat

    mosccat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Member:
    #304323
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    First Name:
    Mark
    Vehicle:
    2020 OR DCLB ——— F1-Lando/McLaren
    Thanks for the write up, when you're not hitched up and your bed is empty do the sumo springs make contact with the frame or is there a gap? TIA

    Also what WDH did you go for?
     
  5. Oct 13, 2021 at 3:35 PM
    #1705
    atomicode

    atomicode Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2019
    Member:
    #284674
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Plano, TX
    Vehicle:
    2017 TRD Off-Road DCSB 4WD
    Recently rented RPOD 190 from Outdoorsy for a camping trip:
    Stats: RPOD 190
    UVW: 2950
    GVWR: approx - 3832
    Hitch Weight: 332

    My Tacoma:
    2017 TRD-OR DCSB -
    OEM Tow package
    Stock suspension
    Falken Wildpeaks A/T3W 265 /70 R16 112T SL
    Added
    Tekonsha 90160 Primus IQ Electronic Brake Control
    Tekonsha Trailer Brake Controller Harness
    SuperSprings SSR-612-40 | SumoSprings Rear for Toyota Tacoma, blue

    I had approximately 450-500 lbs of passenger/gear in the truck, and maybe 150 lbs of food/gear in trailer, plus 30 gallons of fresh water. Regular hitch. This was my first time towing so I was cautious and mostly traveling flat to hilly terrain in Texas and Arkansas. The truck handled this trailer weight with ease with only a few instances where I felt it pushing or porpoising over rough road surfaces. Never felt sway issues from wind or passing trucks, although I pretty much kept it around 60mph on the highway. Truck would cruise mostly in 4th/5th gear and around 3000-4000 rpm depending on terrain. Uphill giving it gas it always seemed to have plenty of power for me, but these were short duration inclines in Arkansas "mountains". Got around 10-11 mpg on the way to AR and camping. However, on the way home, I emptied all the RV tanks. That made a noticeable difference in both feel and mileage. MPG on the way home jumped to 14-15. I definitely would not bother with carrying full fresh water tank again since we were always using city water at parks.

    Summary:
    For me, brake controller and sumo springs I think are a must for towing/carrying any significant weight. Really helped provide good control for braking and the sumo springs did a great job of handling the extra hitch weight, reducing sag, and overall ride quality. I will say ride quality with sumo springs without towing/hauling anything seems a little more harsh over bumps around town than stock bump stops.
    I may buy travel trailer in the future and I think the Tacoma sweet spot for me is trailer GVWR not greater than 4000lbs. I would also get a WD hitch as well. If I were driving really long distances or over the Rockies, I might consider additional trans cooler, but I tend to think Toyota engineered it beyond its documented capabilities.
    20210918_132055.jpg
     
    MaverickT883 and grogie like this.
  6. Oct 13, 2021 at 9:00 PM
    #1706
    deusxanime

    deusxanime Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2017
    Member:
    #223889
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    1,520
    Gender:
    Male
    MN
    Vehicle:
    2020 Cement OR DCSB V6 6MT 4x4 Prem+AdvTech+LED
    Here's my post where I put them in. Without a topper there was a bit more than an inch of gap. Once I got the topper on, there was just a tiny bit of gap left, but still not quite touching.
     
    atomicode likes this.

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