1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Glampers! Tell me about "state Park" camping outlets

Discussion in 'Outdoors' started by VTCAL, Jan 11, 2022.

  1. Jan 11, 2022 at 5:45 PM
    #1
    VTCAL

    VTCAL [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2021
    Member:
    #358973
    Messages:
    638
    Vehicle:
    2021 Sport
    My wife and I. In our "golden Years", (At least the urine indicates so")
    tried a bit of camping last summer, and sort of like it.

    We did the "tent camping" thing out of a Soft topper fitted Long bed Taco.

    What we didn't consider, was that for like $10 we could have electricity to power up a heated blanket etc. We did not "enjoy" roughing it at 10.000 feet in the rain and 30 degree temps. Sucked actually.

    Any way, my question, having not "rented a space" with a power box.
    The listing for the fees follows

    50 amp for $xx
    a 30 Amp for $xx
    Both of those box outlets are "Glamperr specials"
    or "tent space" for $nearly nothing sucker (actually we had great spots many times.)

    What about a couple hundred WATTS at 110V. or 240V like a dryer receptical?

    What is common? What might be expected? I went to the camper section at the local "Runnings" They had a 4ft by 4ft display wall of all sorts of adapters etc that I didn't see the need for.

    I just want to find a simple 15 amp 3 prong wall receptical (or two) in the box. That would be worth the fee on a cold dreary evening.

    Anyone here done the "State Park" thing? They sure have nice showers. ;-)
     
  2. Jan 11, 2022 at 5:52 PM
    #2
    crazysccrmd

    crazysccrmd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Member:
    #181592
    Messages:
    6,341
    Gender:
    Male
    Colorado Springs
    Vehicle:
    22 TRX
    Lots of options for extension cords that terminate in three standard outlets. The 30 amp plug ins are 110v and the 50 amp plug ins are normally 220v. A 30amp 110v can provide a bit over 3000 watts which is more than you should need for just about anything.
     
    strider98 likes this.
  3. Jan 13, 2022 at 8:04 AM
    #3
    VTCAL

    VTCAL [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2021
    Member:
    #358973
    Messages:
    638
    Vehicle:
    2021 Sport
    Thanks

    It might have been that the adapter that I would have thought to be the one was out of stock or I just didn't see it.
     
  4. May 25, 2022 at 5:05 AM
    #4
    tonykarter

    tonykarter Crappie Savant

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Member:
    #163801
    Messages:
    1,318
    Gender:
    Male
    Snuff Gully, Texas
    Vehicle:
    2018 DCSB 4x4 Sport 1993 4Runner SR5 4x4, 411,000 miles
    Pine tree air freshener
    If electricity is all you need and don't need the rest of the state park "camping" experience, with emphasis on the " ", then please give serious consideration to purchasing a small 2200watt generator. Armed with one of these you can get far away from the assembled multitudes. You can find 2000-2200 generators on sale as low as ~$350 and they are more than powerful enough to supply your needs. Is the sound of a generator an issue? It's less disturbing than the sound of an intense party two campsites down that you weren't invited to attend. And it doesn't yell out drunk at 2:30am like it is Hank Williams Jr. Been there, endured that. I own Honda EU2200 and like they advertise, they are quieter than a normal conversation at 20 feet. Get a 50-foot extension cord and put it out there with something in front of it to block and diffuse the low hum and you almost can't hear it. One of mine runs on gas, the other I set up to run on propane. VERY economical. So you carry an 8lb or a 20lb cylinder rather than a 5lb. I use it to power a 6,000Btu window A/C to sleep cool during the night. The A/C drowns out the sound of the generator. What sound there is operates as soothing white noise.

    Besides, campsites with water and electricity around here now go for $30-35/night. My ass! I remember when it was $6. BITE ME Corp of Engineers! It costs me nothing to sleep in my boat out on your lake. Or in my boat on your boat ramp. I'm on the lake all day so I really have no need for a campsite.

    You are right about state park showers. Most of them are awesome...and unending hot water!
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
  5. May 25, 2022 at 5:48 AM
    #5
    Marshall R

    Marshall R Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2015
    Member:
    #156224
    Messages:
    3,410
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Marshall
    Vehicle:
    07 White TRD double cab
    none
    My wife and I have been doing this for years. Leaving tomorrow headed from GA to Maine. Last summer Colorado. We've used pop-ups, small travel trailers and tent camped. Back of the truck sucks. I will only do it if only spending 1-2 nights in a spot when I'm hunting and by myself. Otherwise, we pitch a tent.

    We are taking a tent to Maine and plan to travel slow and see a lot along the way. We will camp some nights, stay in a motel other nights.

    The 50 amp sites are only for BIG RV's. My 22' travel trailer only needs 30 amps. But sometimes the only sites available are with 50 amp hook ups. I've never used electricity when tent camping. A small propane heater inside the tent will keep you toasty warm unless temps are near 0. Even a propane Coleman lantern burning will provide enough heat to be comfortable.

    The small Honda generators are great. Very quiet and reliable. But at about $1000 each are just more than I can pay. We bought 2 of these from Sams Club a few years ago. One of them will power up everything in my travel trailer except the AC. I can connect the 2, run them both and also run the AC.

    A-iPower SUA2300i Ultra-Quiet Inverter Generator with Mobility Kit (CARB Compliant) - Sam's Club (samsclub.com)

    We also camp in National Parks where there is no electricity. The generators can only be run during certain hours, but that is easy enough to make work. The generators are primarily used when primitive camping with no facilities at all.

    Campground prices are all over the place. Some are free, some private campgrounds can be $100+ per night. We spent 3 days near the Smoky's recently. All the NP campgrounds were full and the only private campground we found was $120/night. We got a hotel room for $70 and left the camper at home.
     
  6. May 25, 2022 at 10:45 AM
    #6
    mic_sierra

    mic_sierra Super White Taco

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2021
    Member:
    #383480
    Messages:
    494
    Gender:
    Male
    Elsewhere
    Vehicle:
    '21 DCSB TRD Sport Auto
    20 AMP is the standard I have seen in Nebraska State Parks and the RV campgrounds in Wyoming I have been to. I haven't come across any 15 Amp outlets yet, all I see are 20 Amp GFCI outlets and that is what I tell the staff when they ask for my electrical needs. Depending on where you go, you may see a 50 Amp outlet, and 30 Amp outlet, and a pair of 20 amp outlets (like the ones in your home or garage) on the same panel with circuit breakers somewhere on the panel.

    If all you are looking to run is a heated blanket and some peripherals you may want to consider investing in a Jackery or Bluetti or other battery pack with a solar panel. Top off the charge during the day from your vehicle when underway or from the sun at a campground then be toasty at night.

    Edit: Here is the panel I am currently plugged into...
    IMG_3856.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
  7. May 25, 2022 at 11:07 AM
    #7
    Rumpled

    Rumpled Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2021
    Member:
    #385145
    Messages:
    64
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jimbo
    OC, CA
    Vehicle:
    2022 MGM DCSB OR 4x4
    None yet
    30 amp will certainly be plenty.
    I have seen some outlets without a 110 plug.
    Get an adapter plug at any RV store, or even Walmart and such. It comes in handy.
     
  8. May 25, 2022 at 11:22 AM
    #8
    Rock Lobster

    Rock Lobster Thread Derailer

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2018
    Member:
    #275833
    Messages:
    8,042
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ryan
    Dee Eff Dub
    Vehicle:
    Sport Crew represent

    Most state parks in my neck of the woods will have either a 30A or a 50A (sometimes both), AND two 15A three-prongers alongside. They look like this:

    [​IMG]

    Just in case, this guy is 5 bucks and relatively small; pack it with your 100 ft extension cord.

    https://www.amazon.com/Camco-PowerGrip-Durable-Electrical-Adapter/dp/B00192QB3I?th=1


    But yeah, if you want electric, either look for "TENT ONLY _ ELECTRIC" or, if your favorite park doesn't have that, grab a 30A spot. Those usually have a tent pad as part of the site.
     
    Rumpled, VTCAL [OP] and mic_sierra like this.
  9. May 25, 2022 at 12:03 PM
    #9
    tonykarter

    tonykarter Crappie Savant

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Member:
    #163801
    Messages:
    1,318
    Gender:
    Male
    Snuff Gully, Texas
    Vehicle:
    2018 DCSB 4x4 Sport 1993 4Runner SR5 4x4, 411,000 miles
    Pine tree air freshener
    Just to be extra safe, consider using one of these: https://www.amazon.com/DEWENWILS-Ou...33&sprefix=campsite+gfi+,aps,156&sr=8-11&th=1

    You can never be too careful. With budgeting constraints some of our campgrounds have fallen into disrepair. Some of the campsite electric outlets I have seen are downright scary. (How many have you seen with burn marks around the plugs?) That.
     
    Rumpled likes this.
To Top