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Going Alone - Single Vehicle Wheeling & Safety

Discussion in 'Off-Roading & Trails' started by Mxpatriot, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. Nov 9, 2019 at 12:02 AM
    #181
    nvnv

    nvnv Well-Known Member

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    I took the wilderness first responder course through NOLS last year and it was awesome. They go in depth into most issues you will come across in the backcountry and it is a lot of practical hands on training. They also do a shorter wilderness first aid class that I’ve heard is good too.

    I think it’s one of the things most people miss. You can have the most badass rig with a stocked first aid kit but if you don’t have the training it’s worthless.
     
    Justrom, underaroof and jubei like this.
  2. Nov 11, 2019 at 9:51 AM
    #182
    Spoonman

    Spoonman Granite Guru

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    Blew a bead during a solo run Saturday. Was rolling again I about 10 minutes. Hilift, air hose, chain to strap the suspension up, give the rim a wipe, it went back on easily

    [​IMG]

    5 mins later
    [​IMG]

    if it didn’t go on this easily, next is starting fluid. If not that, then chuck on the spare. If you’re going alone go prepared gentlemen.
     
  3. Nov 11, 2019 at 11:24 AM
    #183
    TomTomBikes

    TomTomBikes Well-Known Member

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    ColoRADo
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    ...checking bank account...
    Found a Subie up in the hills this weekend. They had been "shoveling for hours" with just a snow scraper. Pulled out quick and they were gone without a thank you before I could even put the gear away.

    IMG_2294.jpg
     
  4. Nov 11, 2019 at 2:07 PM
    #184
    Spoonman

    Spoonman Granite Guru

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    yeah that seems about right
     
  5. Jan 13, 2020 at 2:11 PM
    #185
    PacNW_Taco

    PacNW_Taco Get lost.

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    Pumpkin spice latte withdrawal. Jonesin for another fix.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2020 at 2:20 PM
    #186
    whatstcp

    whatstcp Professional incoherent spammer

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    Ed
    Fontana, CA
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    King + Archive Relocation Wheeler's bumps +hydros
    a lot of times the people that you help in situations like this are incredibly embarrassed and/or fear being surprised with a fee for being recovered.

    I have found that if they are alone or same gender (couple of friends hanging out) they are more likely to be thankful and offer payment/beer/smoke for helping them out. However, if it's a dude with his gf/wife or female "friend" that he's trying to woo, then they often scurry away as soon as they are free. My theory is that the dude is always embarrassed or ashamed of putting themselves in that situation and having to be rescued by someone else. Not good for their ego or their female partner's perception of them.
     
    BalutTaco likes this.
  7. Jan 13, 2020 at 3:12 PM
    #187
    TomTomBikes

    TomTomBikes Well-Known Member

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    ...checking bank account...
    Two chicks about my age and a dog. I did have a real bad blonde mustache when this happened, so that's probably what it was.....
     
    whatstcp likes this.
  8. Jan 13, 2020 at 3:52 PM
    #188
    whatstcp

    whatstcp Professional incoherent spammer

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    well there goes that theory. Maybe it's just people from California for me then that always have something to prove
     
  9. Jan 15, 2020 at 10:50 PM
    #189
    scleaf

    scleaf Well-Known Member

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    SaBellCo's Tailgate Lock :), Cable mod
    Nice thread, Thanks OP

    Been looking at options to let me go alone, ended up with the InReach as a present and ham radio (thank you Santa)

    Was thinking of a way that we as a community can help one another in the event that you need someone to get you out of a hard spot. I see the post and this is the fastest way to get help in the US due to the vast locations of good people across this form.

    So far I have tested the InReach with the preset messages, you get three unlimited canned messages you can send directly to sms, email message with lat, long info, map link and allow someone to respond (this cost you money on the basic plan after the first 10). You can send as many of these presets as you want as part of the $14.99 a month plan. If you really want to get unlimited send receive text messaging you can spend $69 for the 30 day commitment then go back to $14.95 plan. Not too bad if it gives your family the security they need to let you go alone.

    My InReach config is: $14.95 plan plus 17.95 a year for $100,000 Recovery insurance for me. If my wife is with me and she is hurt, then so am I and they will come for me and get us both.

    This may not work in a cave, hole or well, so stay out of those when you are alone and keep the device with you at all times. In case you have to run and hide or leave your vehicle.

    Message #1 Starting/Stopping Here, All is good will reach out soon. (GPS Lat Long, Map shared) (Wife, Brother, Son)
    Message #2 Delayed Working through issues but safe, Will send #1 when back on track (GPS Lat Long, Map shared) (Wife?? Brother, Son)
    Message #3 Stuck, Need Recovery, I am Safe, Execute Recovery Plan Will Advise (Buddy #1 Buddy #2 Notified, Brother, Son Wife??) They can respond to message and you can provide details. (GPS Lat Long, Map shared) but you do get charged if on the $14.95 Plan so designate who is going to respond.

    Message #4 Preconfigured Text Message: Hitting SOS button, need immediate medical help at this location for someone else (Garmin verified to me the other person is responsible for all cost)
    Message #5 Preconfigured Text Message: Hitting SOS button, need immediate medical help, at this location for me. "This is an Emergency"
    Message #6 Preconfigured Text Message: Need Police at this location
    Message #7 Preconfigured Text Message: Need Fire/Rescue at this location

    All other are free form.

    SOS: Button, unlimited two way communication with all plans. They will notify you emergency contacts and send help to the exact location based on your communication.

    Recovery Plan: Contact Buddy #1 Buddy #2, Verify they are aware and are going to respond. If not Call Buddy #3,4,5 ....n
    This is where we can call upon a buddy here to post the help needed and be the hero that saves us...Without using the SOS.

    After reading a few of the stories, My thought is travel during day, stay on plan, route and take calculated risk, ask yourself why and what if before taking risky moves.

    Since reading this thread I have a list a mile long of the things I should carry, but my main ones are, food, water, coffee first aid, sunblock, clothes, shelter, heat, power, communications, supplies for 10 days, MRE's, peanut butter will keep you alive and travels well. Extra gas and solar charger and spare charging batteries recovery gear. I will stay put with my 9mm and wait for help and communicate as required/needed.

    Gear List: The long list to be compiled.... Thanks OP and responders....
     
    TheJungleJesse and whatstcp like this.
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