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Hauling....weight. 1800lbs. Shocks?Springs? Timbrems?

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by Murrfk, Apr 29, 2011.

  1. Apr 29, 2011 at 3:39 PM
    #1
    Murrfk

    Murrfk [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I have a 96 Tacoma 4x4 with a 2.7l engine. One of the things I need to be able to do with this truck is bring home a load of water several times a week. 20 miles half of it on gravel roads. I used to do this with my 90 Toyota 4x4 until a tree fell on it.

    When loaded, there is about 1-2" of clearance at the bump stops. The springs are flat on the overload spring. I have read stock tacoma springs are not great, and I don't want to wreck the springs.

    I don't know much about suspension. Some are suggesting adding an overload spring. Others say Timbrem bump stops. There seems to be some suggestion that shocks could assist.

    I would appreciate any guidance on this. My aim is to keep the weight from doing damage. Let me know your thoughts.
     
  2. Apr 29, 2011 at 3:40 PM
    #2
    OZ-T

    OZ-T Quite an experience to live in fear , isn't it ?

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    Air bags or Dakars
     
  3. Apr 29, 2011 at 3:43 PM
    #3
    mjp2

    mjp2 Living vicariously though myself Moderator

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    That's a lot of weight in the bed. Like, A LOT of weight.

    I'd recommend getting a trailer. You can definitely tow that much with your Tacoma but it's not a great idea to have that kind of weight in the bed.

    If that's not an option, you'll probably want new leaf springs and possibly the Timbrens.

    Others will likely chime in with better ideas. Stay safe!
     
  4. Apr 30, 2011 at 7:42 PM
    #4
    Murrfk

    Murrfk [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thx. I can't do a trailer as I have to park in a lot with only space for one vehicle throughout the day. I've thought about it though!

    I hauled this same 180 gallon tank with my older toyota 4x4 (and hauled 3000 and 5000 lbs with my even older chevys). It is a lot a weight and it can be hard on the truck.

    How will the different options effect the handling of the vehicle? Anyone know if Dakars are available in Canada?
     
  5. Apr 30, 2011 at 7:50 PM
    #5
    OZ-T

    OZ-T Quite an experience to live in fear , isn't it ?

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    I got my OME kit including the Dakars through Cap-it .

    http://capit.com/truck-accessories.html
     
  6. May 2, 2011 at 9:34 PM
    #6
    james

    james In over my head...

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    I was facing a similar situation when I drove the Alcan Highway from Seattle to Fairbanks last August. I was riding ON my jounce bumpers and I had to retrofit my truck en-route before the frost heaves on the Alcan destroyed my truck. I think I had more than 1400 lbs in it. The boys at Interior Offroad in Prince George B.C. fixed me up with some Firestone Ride-Rite airbags. Adjustable with a simple schrader valve, the air bags made all the difference. They saved me.

    The only downside is that I have to be very careful if I go off-roading and extend my rear suspension to the point where air bags (of any manufacture) will tear. Still, it sounds like you'll need to haul water much more than you'll need to rock-crawl. Consider it.
     
  7. May 4, 2011 at 6:29 PM
    #7
    Murrfk

    Murrfk [OP] Well-Known Member

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    While I think springs might be the best way to go, I did get a set of Timbrems for a good price and will try them. They are apparently rated for 3000lbs.

    Cap-it doesn't have any local stores and doesn't ship the suspension kit.
     
  8. May 4, 2011 at 6:30 PM
    #8
    OZ-T

    OZ-T Quite an experience to live in fear , isn't it ?

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    Good luck .
     
  9. May 6, 2011 at 7:23 PM
    #9
    michaelg589

    michaelg589 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you need to buy bigger trucks. Even a new V6 Tacoma is only rated to have about 800-1000 lbs in the bed. Gross weight for my truck is 52** lbs. I think. Im probably at 4200 with just me and a tank of gas.

    A friend of mine has exactly the same truck as you. He does tow things he shouldnt, and he hasnt had any issues... yet. But why risk it?

    Go back to a full size if your line of work demands this kind of hauling.
     
  10. May 7, 2011 at 6:24 AM
    #10
    Murrfk

    Murrfk [OP] Well-Known Member

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  11. May 8, 2011 at 5:59 PM
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    michaelg589

    michaelg589 Well-Known Member

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    I can't say I would trust that source. They don't even display a picture of a Tacoma. They show a Tundra.

    http://www.edmunds.com/toyota/tacoma/2007/features-specs.html?style=100793724

    That shows capacities for 2nd gens. Gross weight for my truck is 5350. Max payload is 1370. The highest payload rating would be for the AC V6 models. As they are lgihter than a DC yet are using the same frame and Powertrain. A DC long bed will have the lowest payload rating.

    Theres no way a 96 4 cyl. Tacoma could handle a ton in the bed.
     
  12. May 8, 2011 at 6:07 PM
    #12
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Well-Known Member

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    I hauled 1830 lbs in mine and got scolded here with regards to the rear end seals. The springs on my truck are hella tough but I never thought of the rear end till they brought it to my attention. Maybe you need a truck made for that kind of weight.
     
  13. May 17, 2011 at 6:15 PM
    #13
    james

    james In over my head...

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    What do you mean "rear end seals"? I know when *I* lift more than my weight limit, my "rear end seals" pucker and perhaps pop, but I didn't know my truck had the same - er- vulnerability.

    I know my Ride-Rite airbags will help me manage a load greater than the truck is rated for, and that if I exceed my GVW the risk is on me, but I didn't know about "rear end seals." Please explain. Could be messy. :eek:
     
  14. May 18, 2011 at 9:16 AM
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    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Well-Known Member

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  15. May 18, 2011 at 3:07 PM
    #15
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    I think timbrems would be a BIG help. I put timbrems in the rear of my truck. I was able to carry 900lbs of motorcycles and 500lbs worth of people and gear in the cab for 3000 miles. not exactly the same as what you need to do but they seemed to handle it pretty easily.
     
  16. May 18, 2011 at 3:12 PM
    #16
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    Most manufacturer hauling ratings aren't based on the strength of the trucks components like the axle or engine but the strength of the braking system and its ability to safely stop the vehicle in an emergency. Mostly for legal reasons. I'd say the truck can handle the weight, just don't go down the highway at speed with it.
     
  17. May 18, 2011 at 11:27 PM
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    james

    james In over my head...

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  18. May 19, 2011 at 4:05 AM
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    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Well-Known Member

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    He was talking about the seals at the ends of the rear axel housing. Apparently too much weight on the rear axel can cause those seals to separate and cause leakage. That is the best I can do on this. I aint a mechanic either but I get it that it aint advisable to haul almost 2000lbs in a Tacoma that only weighs 4000lbs anyway. I should have made 2 trips. But it's cool she took it with no issues. This is what I do know.
    A floating rear axel has flanges and hubs at the ends of the rear end that are load bearing and cradle the axel to allow it to just drive the wheels. These are in severe service larger trucks. We do not have floating rear axels in our trucks, so our axels have to bear weight as well as drive the wheels-apparently too muce weight can cause the axel to bow or even bend which may pop those end seals. Hope this explains it for you.
     
  19. May 19, 2011 at 4:29 AM
    #19
    jandrews

    jandrews Carolina Alliance Southwest Region Ambassador

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    That kind of weight calls for a full-size truck.

    If you need to do it with the Tacoma, tow it if you can. Otherwise, get some airbags, and prepare for parts of your powertrain to wear out prematurely if you haul regularly.
     
  20. May 19, 2011 at 9:41 AM
    #20
    Murrfk

    Murrfk [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I have a full size truck, but the price of gas to drive it is why I bought the toyota. It was costing me about 50cents a mile, and I have to drive 40 miles each day. I put the timbrems in and they keep the springs off the overloads, which is a benefit. I take it easy. I think the biggest issue is the lack of floating axles, which also puts strain on the bearings.

    As I stated earlier, I did haul this same tank, with the same weight, for several years with a stock 1990 Toyota 4x4 2.4l. The timbrems seem to be helping the springs from being overloaded, which was my main issue.

    I have had to haul water with trucks for over twenty years. Water can be nasty to haul because it is, literally, a fluid load. I always drive like I have a ten inch spike sticking out of the middle of the steering wheel.
     
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