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Heaviest towable travel trailer for a 3rd gen OR??

Discussion in '3rd Gen. Tacomas (2016-2023)' started by Mortavius141, Feb 15, 2021.

  1. Apr 8, 2021 at 10:04 PM
    #41
    lynlan1819

    lynlan1819 Well-Known Member

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    Your truck will tow it with no problem.
     
  2. Apr 9, 2021 at 7:48 AM
    #42
    zoo truck

    zoo truck Well-Known Member

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    Had quite the fiasco yesterday putting my boat in as i forgot to install the drain plugs. Boat was in the water floating off the trailer filling, and sinking fast. On top it the loading ramp was a steep incline on soft grass. Had to think fast to turn on the boats bilge pump, then winch the boat back on the trailer. Once on you couldn't believe how heavy it was full of water. With the truck in 4wd lo it pulled everything out without any problem. Even my brother that watched was shock how easy it went. At any rate relieved, i got the drain plugs installed, and put it back in the lake.
     
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  3. Apr 10, 2021 at 11:10 AM
    #43
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

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    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    No issues with this trailer. 24ft 28ft to the tongue. Im running 4x4 sport. Not OR. Not sure if it matters. 5500 dry. Loaded i am sure at 6k. Not to mention 3 steel framed bikes in the back and a 4 person raft. 2856A50B-EE43-41E2-BFE4-2660A7B5D872.jpg
    drove it from IE to san diego. Always at s mode 4th gear with ect on. Trans temp never hit 170. Always drive it 50-55. Every now and then 60-65 without knowing it. Up the hills never hit 5k rpm. Mpg 10avg. I never tow it with liquids at all. Foods and cloths yuppers.
    Aftermarket trans cooler of course. Thermostat pinned open. Steel hooke road roof rack. Front bodyarmor4x4 steel bumper, tyger nerf bars dual steel girdles. Arb rear lockers. Geared 4:88 33” skinnys, 255/80/17 open toyo atii all tires at 55psi, fox 2.5 with res front, fox 2.0 with dc res adjustors rear. 1.5” aal. Airbags rear at 20 psi. Drives great! Tekonsha p3 brake controller and this trailer brakes me! Feels wonderful and safe. Tuned by K&D. I get 19.4avg mpg without trailer and 10-14 avg when towing.
     
  4. Jun 11, 2021 at 5:58 PM
    #44
    DanishTaco

    DanishTaco Well-Known Member

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    Hey! Do you like the towing with the 4.88 gears? Do you wish you would have went 5.29s? Im in debating on which gears to get at thw moment. Btw im pulling a 2400lbs dry 18 ft teardrop trailer (3.2k loaded)
     
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  5. Jun 11, 2021 at 8:00 PM
    #45
    MaverickT883

    MaverickT883 Paintless

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    Check build thread!
    This is what I tow, and certain years live out of in the warmer months. It is a 2015 Palomino Palomini 180FB, dry weight is 2950, loaded is 4000. I wouldn't want to go much bigger for a long haul trailer, this setup is very comfortable for long hauls with a WDH. I tow this 6+ hours at a time, and it isn't white knuckled at all.

    20210531_185305 (1).jpg
    20210531_185311 (1).jpg
    20210530_102759 (1).jpg
     
  6. Jun 21, 2021 at 1:52 AM
    #46
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

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    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    43497951-6E19-4E4C-B9C7-4E65F00FFA9F.jpg Just came from I want to say the ultimate towing test with my set up.

    Coming from so cal to yosemite via the hwy 140 from merced (with some steep grades 6-7% then thru the tioga pass going down 8% x 39 miles (brakes could do better) as I saw little smoke coming from them. And yes I geared down to 3rd with rpms screaming. The grade is scary.

    then to mammoth lakes followed by the 395 back to socal.

    Engine temps never above 206, trans temp never above 199 via scangauge.


    ...only to go to lake mead near vegas 3 days after via the cajon pass 6% x 21 miles and a long stretch perhaps 10 miles of 6% grade at 120 degree ambient temp! my engine temp went whopping 230 degrees tops and trans temp at 220 degrees running 40mph inclines.

    To answer your question, I have no way of knowing the difference between 5:29 and 4:88 gears. I only know 5:29s you will have higher rpms as your top speed is around 80mph where as at 4:88 you can still desert run at 100 easy before rpms get uncomfortable. You also get smaller teeth at that ratio so physically higher chance of having something breaking if “breaking in” or installation procedure is not followed properly. If you never wheel above 80, even on hwy, by all means 5:29 should be good as I hear its easier on your transmission. Just get it tuned properly.


    I am more than happy with my 4:88. I run skinny tires but 33”. I like the taller tires but the weight of stock. Works for me with what I do.
     
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  7. Jun 21, 2021 at 7:44 AM
    #47
    Paulndot

    Paulndot Well-Known Member

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    Couple o' things... If this info is obvious to you, sorry in advance. Otherwise, there's A LOT more to towing safely than just tow rating. "Balls-to-the-wall, skinny pedal matted, hair on fire, she tows or she blows" towing is a completely different thing. If you’re asking the questions - I doubt you’re one of those guys. Lots of people will tell you what they do, and specs be dammed. Unless they hand you a blank check at the end of the day to replace your truck, or cast some kind of wizard's spell to keep your family from being spread down 1/2 a mile of highway - DON'T LISTEN TO THEM. You have to do your own research man, and that research should be specific to the trailer you want. The info is out there. After getting just a little smart (a little) on towing, I've come to realize how many accident time-bombs are on the road. Now, about those numbers...

    The "towing capacity" of any vehicle is exactly that - what it can tow, but not necessarily manage. The 6400lb rating means a sled, weighing 6400lbs can be pulled by a line with the truck. Wether or not it can be safely managed by your truck when attached is a whole other can of worms. You don't want the tail to wag the dog - ever. Every item on the truck affects that weight, AND your payload and GVWR. So, start subtracting lbs for all the neat stuff we love - bigger, heavier tires, armor, sliders, etc. The lbs add up with the quickness. It's a big surprise how much stuff actually weighs. Clothes, tools, recovery gear, water (pretty heavy at 8.3lbs per gallon), people, animals...keep subtracting lbs.

    The "dry weight" of a trailer is what it weighs at the end of the assembly line, and like someone else already mentioned, most of the time doesn't include propane, propane tanks, load outs, etc. Here's a funny thing, just as an example: a 20lb propane tank actually weighs close to 40lbs (I can hear a few jaws hitting the floor). It's 20lbs of propane without the weight of the tank, which is about 18lbs of steel. Most of us, myself included only counted for the 20lbs. That was before I was smacked in the head with the educational 2x4. Keep subtracting lbs.

    Here’s a couple of links to our capacities, but it’s always better to get them from the manual:

    https://www.toyota.com/tacoma/ebrochure/

    https://www.toyotamobility.com/mobility-solutions/hitch-load-guidelines

    Tongue weight varies greatly from trailer to trailer, and isn't necessarily proportional to the weight of the trailer. Sometimes a light trailer will have a heavier tongue weight due to the design. Tongue weight should be between 10-15 percent of gross trailer weight (GTW). For example, a 10,000-lb trailer should have a tongue weight between 1,000 lbs and 1,500 lbs. Now, for our Tacomas, depending on the model, that weight is between 350 and 680lbs. For a 2020 O/R with a M/T it’s 640lbs. That comes from Toyota, not from "my buddy tows a 24K pound whatever uphill all day and it’s fine". You'll get a lot of that in here. If you use a weight distributing hitch, that’s gonna add approximately 100 lbs, of tongue wight, so start subtracting from the 680. Also, where you load stuff quickly adds lbs to the tongue weight (a lot of crap fits under the floor in that front pass-through storage). It’s all adding weight on the hitch point. It's important where that weight goes. Check this out:

    https://youtu.be/w9Dgxe584Ss

    Gross Axle Weight Ratings (GAWR). This is a trojan horse. You’ll find this on the door jamb sticker, and it specifies each axle, and with which size tire they’re rated. For example: the axles on my 2020 are rated at 2940 lbs front and 3280 lbs rear. You would have to get your axles checked at a scale when you're loaded, obviously, but the weight of the trailer, the actual tongue weight, plus the hitch, plus the cargo greatly affects the axle ratings. Look at these two weight tickets from two different trips.

    In the pics below, look at how different the numbers are on each axle. Note there’s only a 60lb difference in the GVWR (truck and trailer). Also note this little kicker… the dry weight, or unloaded vehicle weight UVW of my trailer, per the manufacturer, is only 3634lbs (which in my case includes the propane) - but the actual weight of the trailer on both these trips is 4080 for one and 3900 for the other. That’s a difference of over 400lbs right there. The difference in the two trips? 2 days worth of food, different gear (hiking vs kayaking) winter clothes vs. spring clothes, etc. Different weight on the truck? Bikes vs kayaks, extra propane, and the most important of all - VEHICLE GEOMETRY. On the scanned ticket, the truck was at a stock height. On the screenshot ticket, it was after installing a lift and slightly taller tires, which changed the pivot points of the weight - shifting some of it from the front to the rear axle. On a WDH, those weights can be dialed in and moved forwards/backwards to better distribute the weight - as the name implies. It doesn’t take much at all. For my hitch, each washer moves about 250lbs forwards or backwards. You’ll also notice my steering axle was overloaded by a little on the first ticket, and the rear axle on the second. Physics - what a fickle bitch. Keep in mind - this is a 3600 lb trailer, that when loaded, is barely over 4K, and the axles are slightly out of spec.

    IMG_1881.jpg

    IMG_2405.jpg

    Screen Shot 2021-06-21 at 9.01.31 AM.jpg

    Tires. Not a huge concern, but still something to keep in mind, because a lot of us are running E-load off road tires for the sidewall protection. But the weight rating on the tire is something to look at too. The stock Kevlar Goodyears aren’t bad, but without paying attention - they can be overloaded and cause a blowout. What are you running?

    Homework time: A 5400lb trailer (per the dry weight of the manufacturer) seems to be good to go when we just look at the base numbers. The Taco is good for 6400lbs. 1000 lbs to spare, and a tongue weight (in a perfect world) of 540lbs. Clutch. Add a WDH at 100 lbs, your tongue weight is now at 640lbs already. Now, let’s add two propane tanks at, say, 35lbs each. 710 lbs. You're over. Over the 10% low-end anyway. Wait, what about all the other stuff? The stuff inside the trailer, and in the pass-through storage? All of a sudden the 5400 pound trailer, which seemingly gave you 1000 pounds of wiggle room has you over at least one of the vehicle spec limits... like evil magic.

    When you start to combine all these numbers - it’s confusing as hell. There’s no easy formula - period. EVERY trailer, even identical floorpans from two different manufacturers will have different weight ratings all over it (tongue weights, dry weights, cargo capacity, etc.etc.).

    To answer your question, “…looking at a 29’ trailer with a dry weight of 5400….doable?” It depends on how exact the weight is distributed (tongue, RR axle and FF axle). But that’s just the empty trailer. I’d bet, after it’s all said and done, people & cargo, you’ll be out of spec on one or more categories. Of course, these are all "lawyer" specs, aimed at reducing Toyota's liability. Without some destructive testing - who knows what the truck is truly capable of. For me - not worth the risk man. Not to the truck, not to my family's safety. But that’s just my opinion - your experience may vary. Sorry for sounding preachy, but no one wants to read about another TW member punching his clock for a trailer.
     
  8. Jun 21, 2021 at 8:04 AM
    #48
    GorgeRunner

    GorgeRunner Out There

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    I would never, ever want to see this aluminum Tacoma V6 hit 230°F.
     
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  9. Jun 21, 2021 at 8:34 AM
    #49
    DanishTaco

    DanishTaco Well-Known Member

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    Running tire pressure at 55? Is this normal? Curious on why and the reasoning. I'm not trolling. I really dont know, and also pull a camper frequently. Thanks.
     
  10. Jun 21, 2021 at 9:30 AM
    #50
    FL_TRD Sport

    FL_TRD Sport Suffering from Severe Wallet Drain

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    One of the main reasons I bought my Taco was to have the option of renting a UHaul 5x9 motorcycle trailer and towing my Honda Goldwing when I have somewhere to go with the bike that is too far for me to ride. Bike and trailer looking at roughly 2200 lbs, 900 lbs of it bike. With about 250 lbs tongue weight and usually me and my one bag of luggage being the only other load, I felt comfortable being well within what the Taco could do. The setup is basically a utility trailer with a touring bike on it. Even if the Mrs. decided to come along I'd still be more than ok. If I was looking at towing anything much heavier or longer I would have been looking at a Ram 1500 or F150. I'm a coward when it comes to towing and stay well below what a truck is rated to do. 60 mph is my speed limit when I tow the bike.
     
  11. Jun 21, 2021 at 9:51 AM
    #51
    vicali

    vicali Touch my camera through the fence

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    29 is too long for my comfort..

    We pull a 19flb Hideout, 19.5ft and 4200lbs ready to camp, ~5000lbs headed to the local campsite with a weeks worth of groceries and full water tanks.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Jun 21, 2021 at 1:08 PM
    #52
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

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    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    I run 255/80/17 open country toyo at II tires. Load e rated 10 ply. Manufacterur states not to exceed 80 psi. With towing i rack em up at 55 psi. I could go up to 60. But I never top out for obvious reasons. Not towing I have em at 40 psi and off roading down to 25 psi.

    usually when towing you need em at near top end I read on some forum. Low psi you in for really bad mpg more drag and stress and stretch on the tire with close to 1000 lb tongue weight.

    I like to play it safely... considering what Im towing, some of you may think im crazy and placing my family in danger, but then again, I know when to stop and give it a break. And never did I gave this set up a brrak. Thise hesistant on towing heavy, secret is do not rush to your destination. Take it slow if you have to and that is ok.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
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  13. Jun 21, 2021 at 1:34 PM
    #53
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

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    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    I only touched this number once trying to go 55mph in 120 degree weather up baker 5-6% grade on the I-15. I never did like this number, at 40mph incline my engine temps were steady 218 degrees. (Keeping everything below 220 is my goal)

    trans temp never above 210 with my added trans cooler.

    if it werent for the weather being soo hot from global warming... i’d say my numbers are alot better than others. Ala chevys ton trucks pulling 250/260 temps! Which is nuts. Tundras getting warning lights. Luckly I never had warning lights nor do I ever want or expect it to light. So far in so cal trips to san diego weather, under triple digits, I never hit above 210 on engine and never hit 200 on my trans temp running 55mph all the way without break.
    I am happy with these numbers.

    i do my diff fluid changes every 15k and oil changes every 5k. trans fluid flush every 10k. Never trust “lifetime” fluid from toyota.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
  14. Jun 21, 2021 at 7:27 PM
    #54
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

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    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    Thought I might add...dont get a tundra. I read on their forums (tundras.com) their temps 225 avg operating temp without load. Some hit 300’s with a warning light. By design tacos run better.
     
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  15. Jun 21, 2021 at 8:42 PM
    #55
    2016Tacoman

    2016Tacoman Well-Known Member

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    Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) SAE J2807: "Performance Requirements for Determining Tow-Vehicle Gross Combination Weight Rating and Trailer Weight Rating." says it all.
    Taco is rated for the load as stated and can manage it. Thats the whole point of the standard. Read up on it here https://jalopnik.com/what-is-sae-j2807-what-does-it-mean-for-trucks-1593305929

    Here are the main test methods trucks would be measured on as per J2807:

    • Cooling capability on a long highway upgrade modeled on the Davis Dam grade on Arizona SR 68;
    • Launch and acceleration performance on a level road and a 12 percent upgrade;
    • Combined handling performance – understeer and trailer sway;
    • Combined braking performance – stopping distance and parking brake-hold on grade; and
    • Structural performance for the vehicle and hitch or hitch receiver.
     
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  16. Jun 22, 2021 at 4:33 AM
    #56
    Snowy

    Snowy Is neither here nor there

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  17. Jun 22, 2021 at 4:54 AM
    #57
    Paulndot

    Paulndot Well-Known Member

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    That's a 6 year old article, but "good" info none the less. Why only "good" ? Well, as I said in my post, "For me - not worth the risk man. Not to the truck, not to my family's safety. But that’s just my opinion - your experience may vary." Additionally, there's a pretty important oversight from the article, every one of those categories is based on an assumption of certain weights:

    "New calculations for trailer weight ratings: In addition to the performance standards, SAE J2807 also uses a specific set of assumptions to calculate maximum trailer weight ratings:

    • For light-duty full-size pickups (GVWR < 8,500 lbs.), SAE J2807 assumes that the tow vehicle includes any options with higher than 33 percent penetration;
    • It assumes there is both a driver and passenger in the vehicle, each weighing 150 pounds;
    • It assumes that tow vehicles also include up to 70 pounds of aftermarket hitch equipment (where applicable); and
    • For conventional trailer towing, SAE J2807 assumes that 10 percent of the trailer weight is on the tongue."

    The info on SAE J2807 doesn't account for variables. For starters, the OP is moving to Arizona, so will probably be loaded down pretty heavy. Here's the info from Toyota themselves, I specified a 2020 TRD O/R with A/T:
    TRD OR Tow Specs.jpg

    So, let's adjust the numbers, based on the SAE J2807 "assumptions" and include the 70lb WDH which is accounted for in Toyo's Spec sheet as TSC. 5400lb trailer (dry), unknown if that accounts for LP tanks, 10% tongue weight is 540lbs. In this example, that only leaves 100lbs of room at the tongue. 100lbs, for a person moving across the country, for which, according to SAE J2807, does not account for any cargo. Physics - fickle bitch. I'd trust Toyota's specs, which are specific for their vehicles, over a standardized test any day. Your experience may vary.

    Now, you're saying that "Taco is rated for the load as stated and can manage it." If you go with that, then anytime you go out camping with a 6K pound trailer, which the Taco is rated for, you take nothing with you. No gear, no food, no water. Because you're only 40 pounds below the rated tongue weight...that's a cooler with ice and 2 gallons of water in the bed, or 2 lawn chairs and a few Coleman lanterns in the pass-through storage. Add a kid or a dog in the cab?

    I'd also like to point out the real world numbers from the CAT scales with a 4K pound trailer and a conservative amount of gear - like 2 bikes or a pair of kayaks. Axles are at or above the max. When you put a WDH on a 6K pound trailer (for which the Taco is rated mind you, and is specified on their chart) what do you think the weight will be on the axles? SAEJ2807, when used with Toyota's specs and real world numbers is kinda flawed. But that's the problem with testing for ANY consumer product...no one wants to fail, so the tests are administered with some pretty precise parameters well hidden by the "ooh, aah" numbers. Thus endeth sermon. To each his own.
     
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  18. Jun 22, 2021 at 5:14 AM
    #58
    Toyko Joe

    Toyko Joe Here for the pictures

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    I would look for the smallest dual axle toy hauler to bring if you want a camper and to haul your life. That being said there is some wise advice here to move traditional style with a trailer or box truck. It does come down to weight, weight distribution, acceleration and braking control.

    20’ toy hauler might have the space for your stuff, a bed, kitchen, and toilet. https://www.jayco.com/tools/archive/2014-octane-zx-super-lite/floorplans/
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
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  19. Jun 22, 2021 at 6:01 AM
    #59
    roundrocktom

    roundrocktom Well-Known Member

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    This little guy will save your butt and underwear:

    https://www.sherline.com/product/sherline-trailer-tongue-weight-scale/

    For those who head down I-5 from Portland to Lake Shasta, there is a long downgrade as you go through the Siskiyous.

    Downshift early, take it easy, and keep the speed down before you start down that grade.

    Another pucker spot was Tehacipis (Southern California). 60 mph crosswinds are no joke.

    Yes, our Tacoma's can do amazing jobs, but don't be that guy with a flipped-over trailer who ignored 10% of the weight should be on the hitch, nor ever went through scales.

    For the Home Shop Machinist, you can make your own own. A 1.125" cylinder is pretty close to one square inch, so a pressure gauge in PSI is reading pounds. '61 Cadillac used that size piston on front drum brakes. O'Reilly kit $6.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
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  20. Jun 22, 2021 at 10:16 AM
    #60
    Taco230032

    Taco230032 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2021
    Member:
    #356898
    Messages:
    22
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2016 TRD “bro” 4x4 (no longer a sport)
    Body armor 4x4 semi hidden winch bumper. Hooke road roof rack. Hooke road high height bed rack. Tyger nerf bars. MBRP front skid plate. TRD OR transmission skid plate stock added. TORQUE air bag suspension rear. 4:88 nitro gears. ARB rear lockers with onboard air compressor. KSP 2-4" UCA. Front Fox 2.5 with res with 3" lift. Fox 2.0 with LS adjustors. 2" AAL rear. Open country toyo 255/80/17 33” tires. Stock sport rims. Plastidipped everywhere!
    I know, I know, love that gif! Haha ill speak my mind and explain below lol

    I know what your thinking...hit me in the noggin. I am already looking into a tundra, but I placed my hunt for a tundra on pause because simply, the vast tundra owners experience just doesn't work right with the numbers that I expect. Knowing varnishes to develop at 240 degrees whether trans/engine, I find my lack of faith in tundras to be expected. Alot of people research, and by all means do not stop researching and props to you for doing so. I have done endless reading and still am reading, and as a DIY kind of guy, I took the dips in trying them out. But I can say from experience and having done multiple trips out of state with long grueling grades in winter/mountain (yosemite and mammoth) roads and peak of summer in 120 degree weather (way to vegas) with inclines, along side a friend of mine with towing experience with a full size towing less than what they can handle, it shows that specs on paper is way different than actually doing it.

    I am not encouraging everyone to ignore the warnings, please be safe. Even my set up, triple checked the numbers, I am aware I am within the range of 6400 lbs. But again, my taco is heavily modified much differently than others, if anything, doubtful, maybe, better than a stock tundra. (Desperate need of a v8). Hahaha

    On paper hp and torque numbers, tundras are great, but My past trip alongside a good friend using A full size truck, chevy silverado (maybe its a chevy) hauling a 7k 5th wheel pulling 250/260 engine/ trans respectively. Its insane numbers. And Tundra forum knowing no trans cooler in current gen leaves me dumbfounded, no wonder tundras run 300’s on temps. Here I am stressing over 220 tops under full tow load in 120 degree weather and 7% grade inclines with ac at full blast. Its odd really. But someone enlighten me. I kept thinking maybe my scangauge is reading wrong, but the dial shows the same.

    So far in my experience, its the setup you have that makes it work. Ignore heavy duty leaf packs and aftermarket metal and stick with air bags. I settled with nerf bars over sliders due to weight concerns. Commit to the best WDH on the market, biggest trans cooler and fan you can get, lightest and strongest tire (forget the looks and go for function) stick with oem splash guard skids and not the trd lipstick (your towing, not offroading) and be smart in loading and always drive it safely (follow the speed limit and perhaps slow down and let a semi pass you). But accidents happen because 90% of the time, they go too fast.

    Forgive my ignorance on the many helpful posts of articles and research on this forum. You guys are awesome. But I believe a specific setup doesn’t account for the creditability of the many research people have done on towing.

    All I can say is, do not tow more than 5000 lbs on a stock taco without considering modifications for towing (not overlanding).
     
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