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How To: Clutch Slave cylinder rebuild

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by TacoMX, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. Jan 9, 2012 at 6:48 PM
    #1
    TacoMX

    TacoMX [OP] TW's Official anti body-lift pundit

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    Deltona, Florida
    This is for a 1st gen 2.7 5-speed, but most slave cylinders are pretty much the same so this should work with all of our truck that have a manual transmission.

    My clutch has been acting funny lately, no slipping but the pedal will sometimes lose its pressure and stick to the floor and pre-engage; that usually indicates a bad slave cylinder.

    So after looking for replacements; they run about $45-$80 for aftermarket and re-manufactured...I didn't even want to see how much OEM Toyota was. So me being the cheap SOB and tinkerer I am, I looked for alternatives.

    There are only a few small parts that get replaced, as the unit is just a cylinder with a piston.

    A rebuild kit is only $9-$12. The one I ordered was $12 from advanced autoparts by beck/arnley ; it includes the spring. The one for $9 is from autozone and doesn't include the spring. The beck/arnley kit is also made in Japan, which is nice.

    So we dive in:

    The slave cylinder is located on the drivers side of the tranny (on the 2.7). Its held onto the tranny with two 12mm bolts. And the hardline going into the unit is held on with a 10mm flare-nut fitting.

    IMG_1182.jpg

    IMG_1183.jpg

    The use of a flare nut wrench is advised when removing the hard line fitting, because potential corrosion can make removal of the fitting troublesome if you round off the fitting with an open-ended wrench. But here in FL corrosion isn't a problem and I used an open-ended wrench with no problem.

    It is also advised to bleed all the brake fluid out of the system before you remove the slave cylinder to avoid making a mess.

    IMG_1165.jpg

    The kit:

    IMG_1167.jpg

    Once you have the unit off the truck the first thing you want to do is remove the old dust boot and remove and clean up the push rod because the rod will be re-used.

    IMG_1168.jpg

    IMG_1171.jpg

    Next remove the old piston and spring. Your old one may just fall out depending on how worn it is, or you have to us air to blow it out.

    Old piston in the unit:

    IMG_1170.jpg

    Old (Left) vs. New (right):

    IMG_1172.jpg
    Note how the fins on the seals on the old piston are flattened out compared to the fins on the new ones

    Now you need to clean up the inside of the unit. It took a lot of paper towels and q-tips to clean mine out. Lots of debris and crap in it.

    After cleaning everything up, insert the pushrod into the new dust boot.

    Like so:

    IMG_1174.jpg

    IMG_1176.jpg

    Then after slipping the new spring onto the new piston, insert the new piston into the unit spring first. I read that using caliper grease is recommended to lube the seals, but I didn't have any so I just lubed up the seals with some brake fluid.

    IMG_1178.jpg

    Now is the hardest part...you have to strech the new dust seal over the lip on the unit while fighting against the spring pressure of the piston...and your hands are probably all greasy so it will be a PITA.

    After I got the dust boot on I safety wired the boot on the unit, which probably isn't necessary; but the spool of safety wire was within reaching distance so i did it :D

    IMG_1179.jpg


    Now all you have to do is re-install the unit. The end of the push rod goes in the slot on the arm thats on the tranny. Make sure you snug up the fitting on the hard line. Then all you have to do is bleed the clutch and your done!

    For about $12 and an hours work you can save yourself some decent cash.

    Have fun :cool:
     
  2. May 15, 2012 at 6:07 PM
    #2
    STiLL WILL

    STiLL WILL MY NAME ISN'T WILL

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    Matt [again, not WILL]
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    All kinds of badass shit. Click on the link in my signature to see.
    MAN so glad I found this. I'm pretty sure my slave cylinder is taking a crap. Twice today my pedal lost 90% pressure and I couldn't disengage the motor at all! It was pre-engaging like a mfer. Had to pull over and wait until it got stiff again. I will have to do this ASAP! Thanks for this!
     
  3. May 15, 2012 at 7:36 PM
    #3
    TacoMX

    TacoMX [OP] TW's Official anti body-lift pundit

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    My master cylinder also was bad. Had to replace it. $24 at autozone. Might as well do both while your at it.
     
  4. May 15, 2012 at 9:28 PM
    #4
    STiLL WILL

    STiLL WILL MY NAME ISN'T WILL

    Joined:
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    Gender:
    Male
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    Matt [again, not WILL]
    CA
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    2013 Tacoma T|X Pro TRD Supercharged 4wd 6MT
    All kinds of badass shit. Click on the link in my signature to see.
    Good call. I shall do that.
     
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