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Is silicone spray Bad?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Utard, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:33 AM
    #1
    Utard

    Utard [OP] Well-Known Member

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    On another thread here somebody was talking about spraying down the door weather strips with silicone spray once a year.

    Somebody about 10-15 years ago told me that any amount of silicone spray can kill your O2 sensor. So basically if you spray some around the truck and start it a minute or two later its toast?

    Is there any truth to this?
     
  2. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:37 AM
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    elmo7

    elmo7 Easily Replaceable Member

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  3. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:40 AM
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    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    Probably in an extreme case where an excessive amount was sprayed near the intake and then the truck was started. I'm not an expert but that sounds like one of those things you'd really have to be trying to mess up your truck for it to actually happen (or doing something incredibly stupid).
     
  4. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:45 AM
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    Bryan139

    Bryan139 I have a spectacular aura

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    I cut some wires here. Added some wires there.
    Spray it on a rag away from the vehicle.
     
  5. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:52 AM
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    Utard

    Utard [OP] Well-Known Member

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  6. Mar 12, 2012 at 8:55 AM
    #6
    Bryan139

    Bryan139 I have a spectacular aura

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    I cut some wires here. Added some wires there.
    http://www.boschautoparts.com/BAP_Technical_Resources/Oxygen Sensors/O2_TechInfo_Intervals.pdf

    From the link: "For example, oxygen sensors can fail when the sensor’s ceramic element is exposed to certain types of silicone compounds or when an oil-burning engine leads to the sensor becoming oil-fouled. Also, a small amount of poorly refined gasoline can kill an oxygen sensor, as can the use of some over-the-counter fuel additives which are not “oxygen sensor safe."

    So in short, yes, there is something to it. How exaggerated it is I can't say.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2012 at 9:10 AM
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    badger

    badger Well-Known Member

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    I would say the risk is nil. When someone says "any amount" they clearly don't know. The poison in every case is in the dose. Silicones are in many products used on or around vehicles and there is even silicone sealant that is "sensor safe". If minute quantities of silicone could damage anything they couldn't use a silicone formula at all. The stuff you spray on is carried in a propellant. The propellant evaporates but the silicone stays on the surface. If you were spraying the stuff in or around the engine or intake while the engine was running then maybe you could have a problem. Otherwise I think the claim is nonsense. I use silicone spray for a number of things including the rubber, and I'll continue to do that with no worries.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2012 at 9:23 AM
    #8
    Bryan139

    Bryan139 I have a spectacular aura

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    I cut some wires here. Added some wires there.
    This is from another link I had saved from when I changed mine out:

    What will damage my O2 sensor?

    Home or professional auto repairs that have used silicone gasket sealer that is not specifically labeled "Oxygen sensor safe", "Sensor safe", or something similar, if used in an area that is connected to the crankcase. This includes valve covers, oil pan, or nearly any other gasket or seal that controls engine oil. Leaded fuel will ruin the O2 sensor in a short time. If a car is running rich over a long period, the sensor may become plugged up or even destroyed. Just shorting out the sensor output wire will not usually hurt the sensor. This simply grounds the output voltage to zero. Once the wiring is repaired, the circuit operates normally. Undercoating, antifreeze or oil on the *outside* surface of the sensor can kill it.
     
  9. Mar 12, 2012 at 9:31 AM
    #9
    angrysam

    angrysam Bring Yuengling To MN!

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    I would say "any" would be an incorrect response. It also depends on the compound.

    If you're not spraying it directly into your intake you have nothing to worry about. Even then it would most likely take quite a bit.

    We used silicone spray heavily at the dealership for various things and also at the bus repair shop I'm at now. I can't think of one single vehicle that had an O2 failure attributed to silicone spray.
     
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