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Just installed Toytec coilovers...now a couple questions...

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by Tim A, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. Feb 6, 2010 at 6:37 PM
    #1
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    1. For height adjustments, the instructions say "to lower the height, turn the upper collar clockwise when looking down over the shock" or something like that. So when trying to lower the height of the driver's side coilover, I counted the threads between the spring seat and bottom of the shock and got 14. Then wedged the small spanner up against the brake caliper and turned the large collar from the back of the wheelwell to the front until I saw 12 threads. If I'm looking down over the shock, that's the correct direction according to the instructions, right? But the result was that I raised the height by about 3/4". I'm lost, and tired tonight so I'll try again tomorrow. I know I could just try turning it the other way but that kind of leads to my next question...

    2. If my truck is up on jackstands with wheels removed, can I accurately measure my height adjustments without putting the wheels on and putting the truck on the ground?

    Thanks in advance guys! And I did RTFM and search.:D
     
  2. Feb 6, 2010 at 10:29 PM
    #2
    sincitytaco

    sincitytaco Well-Known Member

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    The tighter you make the spring the more it will lift your truck. If you loosened the tension and the height lifted that just means your suspension has not settled turn the wheels all the way right then left and return to the middle you will set the suspension to zero.
     
  3. Feb 6, 2010 at 10:50 PM
    #3
    THROUGHITALLDUDE

    THROUGHITALLDUDE Someone didnt put the tailgate down!

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    for me it did not matter what the truck was on what you measure while its jacked is the same as how it will sit on the ground. ive got the toytec coilovers and the one thing that sucks really bad about them is adjusting them just be patient and take your time
     
  4. Feb 7, 2010 at 5:43 AM
    #4
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips guys, gonna try again today.
     
  5. Feb 7, 2010 at 6:07 AM
    #5
    jrobson

    jrobson Well-Known Member

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    I have the Toytec ultimate lift kit and I drove mine at the set stock height for about 8 months before I noticed it starting to settle. We just adjusted it for the first time about 2 weeks ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Feb 7, 2010 at 6:13 AM
    #6
    misterquad

    misterquad Well-Known Member

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    For an approximation purposes, use 2 to 1. Meaning, if you tighten the coil 1/4" then you raise the truck 1/2" and vicea versa.

    This way you can measure the amount you crank the coil to estimate the new height without raising and lowering over and over.

    I marked the threads with a Sharpie to note my starting or final point depending on the direction I was heading.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Feb 7, 2010 at 9:45 AM
    #7
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good advice guys, especially like the sharpie idea.

    So when the C/O is installed on the truck and I'm cranking on it, and I'm seeing less and less thread between the upper and lower collars, that means I'm lowering the ride height, correct? Another way to ask that would be: the less compression on the spring, the lower the ride height?

    Today I started with 12 threads between the two collars then cranked each C/O until I saw 8 threads...put the truck on the ground and didn't see any change in ride height. I'm going to drive up to the store then measure again.

    Sorry for all the questions, never done this before and thanks for your help!
     
  8. Feb 7, 2010 at 10:53 AM
    #8
    misterquad

    misterquad Well-Known Member

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    On Toytecs you are adjusting the bottom collar under the coil. (other brands you are adjusting the top collar.)

    1. You mark the threads under that bottom collar with a sharpie.
    2. Twist the collar with the spanner wrench.
    3. If the collar start to cover the sharpie mark you are lowering the truck.
    4. If you notice there is a gap starting between the collar and the sharpie mark you are raising the truck.

    (I hope that is what you were asking. My reading and comprehension skills suck.)
     
  9. Feb 7, 2010 at 11:02 AM
    #9
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Yep that answers it, thanks very much for the reply. I think I'm going the right way, just have to let it settle.

    I'm adjusting mine while they're on the truck, I just had to take the wheels off and unbolt the swaybar link to the spanner in there. If you have a spring compressor, I heard it's easier to take them off, compress the spring and then adjust the height. But I don't have a spring compressor.
     
  10. Feb 7, 2010 at 11:20 AM
    #10
    misterquad

    misterquad Well-Known Member

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    One suggestion to make things easier.

    Spray WD-40 on the threads above the bottom collar so that it soaks into the threads and makes the collar easier to twist.

    It is a pain to adjust those things.
     
  11. Feb 7, 2010 at 11:27 AM
    #11
    misterquad

    misterquad Well-Known Member

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    It is a pain but can be done. Just be sure to support the truck by the frame so that the weight is off the coil you are adjusting.

    I played with mine so much that I was able to adjust them by lifting the truck and not removing the wheel or sway bar but it is a very slow procedure and very frustrating.

    I used both spanner wrenches. Turn the collar about 10 degrees with one wrench until it hit the sway bar then use the other wrench and turn the collar 10 degrees and repeat. It is a slow operation and probably faster to put the tire and sway bar.

    I don't envy anyone doing this.
     
  12. Feb 7, 2010 at 1:51 PM
    #12
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Brett, when you say bottom collar you're talking about the big one that you turn with the larger spanner right? That's the one I'm turning and just holding back on the small collar that's closest to the ground when the C/Os installed on the truck.

    Am I doing it wrong lol?
     
  13. Feb 7, 2010 at 2:09 PM
    #13
    jrobson

    jrobson Well-Known Member

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    I took mine off and put them on a spring compressor. We actually bent the spanner wrench trying to adjust them on the truck.
     
  14. Feb 7, 2010 at 3:01 PM
    #14
    misterquad

    misterquad Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    You are correct.

    The larger one is the one that changes the ride height. The smaller one gives you a place to hold if that one spins. In my situation the bottom one did not spin. And since it did not spin I could use both the large and small spanner wrench to turn the larger collar. I am just saying I improvised to speed up the adjustment process so I did not have to keep pulling the wheel off.
     
  15. Feb 7, 2010 at 3:12 PM
    #15
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Wow that's a tight space without taking the wheel off! I'll give it a shot later on b/c after a couple miles I'm still nose high. Thanks for the replies

     
  16. Feb 7, 2010 at 4:20 PM
    #16
    Tim A

    Tim A [OP] Well-Known Member

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    OK I think I've got the idea now. After you guys (especially misterquad) helped me out, and after reading this thread, it's clear that the instructions while correct, are a little confusing to wannabe shade tree mechanics like myself.

    Toytec, if you're listening, a web video detailing how to adjust your coilovers would be nice.

    But since Toytec recommends these things be worked on certified mechanics, it may come down to a liability issue.

    Again thanks for the help TW.
     
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