1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Load Range: C, D, E or P-metric?

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by BryWi, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:00 AM
    #1
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    Looking for opinions on different load ranges and how they compare.

    I do mostly highway driving, but may find the need to do some mild off-roading in the future.

    Would a C load range be a reasonable alternative to D or E, with better ride quality?

    Or would it be more like a P-metric with a little heavier side wall?

    Or somewhere else in between?

    I'm a real newb when it comes to tires, and only know what I have read on TW. I didn't see this particular comparison on any other threads.

    Thanks in advance for any info...
     
  2. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:06 AM
    #2
    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Member:
    #42529
    Messages:
    5,614
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Steve
    San Jose CA
    Vehicle:
    '11 Std Cab 4x4 5sp
    OME suspension, ARB Air Locker, Yaesu FT 8900 Ham Radio
    I don't think you can even buy load range "C" light truck tires anymore - they've all gone D and E.

    Tacomas can't carry enough weight to justify an LT tire on load alone. However, an LT tire, with its thicker casing and increased number of sidewall plies is more durable off road, and less likely to suffer cuts and punctures.

    The downside is the (considerably) increased weight and rolling resistance makes for a less comfortable ride and increased gas mileage.

    My Goodyear MTR/Kevlar LT285/70R17 Load Range D tires weigh roughly twice as much as the Dunlop A20 P245/75R16 tires they replaced. Granted they're also larger, but a P tire in that size would have about split the difference.

    Short answer: If you're not going off road - stick to the P-Metric tires.
     
  3. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:14 AM
    #3
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    I was looking at Geolandar A/T-S in D but read some opinions about the ride stiffening up. And before anyone flames me, I know it's a truck. Just trying to strike a balance between necessary utility and comfort.

    The Falken High Country comes in LT in C range. Only weighs 49 pounds. That's in the running as well.

    It also comes in P-metric..
     
  4. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:15 AM
    #4
    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Member:
    #42529
    Messages:
    5,614
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Steve
    San Jose CA
    Vehicle:
    '11 Std Cab 4x4 5sp
    OME suspension, ARB Air Locker, Yaesu FT 8900 Ham Radio
    OK, If the tires I wanted were available in LT load range C, that's probably what I'd get.

    If you're offroading a lot, you need to be carrying both a spare, and a tire repair kit with air compressor anyway.
     
  5. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:17 AM
    #5
    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Member:
    #42529
    Messages:
    5,614
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Steve
    San Jose CA
    Vehicle:
    '11 Std Cab 4x4 5sp
    OME suspension, ARB Air Locker, Yaesu FT 8900 Ham Radio
    If you're overloading your truck (e.g. double cab with pop-up camper and gear) - step up to load range D.
     
  6. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:18 AM
    #6
    OZ-T

    OZ-T All of those moments....will be lost.....in time

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Member:
    #27584
    Messages:
    23,046
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Peter North
    British Columbia
    Vehicle:
    Mag Grey 09 Trd Sport DCLB 4x4
    OME 885x , OME shocks and Dakars , Wheelers SuperBumps front and rear , 275/70/17 Hankook ATm , OEM bed mat , Weathertech digifit floor liners , Weathertech in-channel vents , headache rack , Leer 100RCC commercial canopy , TRD bedside decals removed , Devil Horns by Andres , HomerTaco Satoshi
    Agreed
     
  7. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:19 AM
    #7
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    Going back to what you said before, the LT and C combo is not common. I've been looking at tires online for two frickin' months and I still can't make up my mind. :rolleyes:

    But I definitely would like to hedge my bets and have a tire capable of going off-road if needed.

    Thanks for your input...
     
  8. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:23 AM
    #8
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    You never know, but I don't anticipate it being a payload issue. More of medium trail-type stuff with smaller rocks and tree roots. Wooded areas, gravel roads, etc.
     
  9. Feb 17, 2011 at 11:49 AM
    #9
    tuckr2

    tuckr2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Member:
    #26115
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    Western Washington State
    Vehicle:
    2010 Silver dbl cab LB 4x4 It's Purdy too!
    LT265/70/17 BFG A/T's, Disabled Seat Belt Buzzer, Black and Gray Covercraft Seat Covers front and rear, Matching SnugTop Supersport Canopy, undercoat, bed mat, window vent shades. Black Weathertech Liners. Trans TSB, Rear Spring TSB Installed.
    Unless your planning on pulling a fairly heavy trailer or something, P metric is what comes on the truck and more than suitable for almost all applications.
    Load range D, E, will affect ride (stiffer), and usually gas mileage (heavier).
     
  10. Feb 17, 2011 at 12:07 PM
    #10
    OZ-T

    OZ-T All of those moments....will be lost.....in time

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Member:
    #27584
    Messages:
    23,046
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Peter North
    British Columbia
    Vehicle:
    Mag Grey 09 Trd Sport DCLB 4x4
    OME 885x , OME shocks and Dakars , Wheelers SuperBumps front and rear , 275/70/17 Hankook ATm , OEM bed mat , Weathertech digifit floor liners , Weathertech in-channel vents , headache rack , Leer 100RCC commercial canopy , TRD bedside decals removed , Devil Horns by Andres , HomerTaco Satoshi
    Check out the Hankook AT's , lots of guys on here are happy with them .
     
  11. Feb 17, 2011 at 12:23 PM
    #11
    tuckr2

    tuckr2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Member:
    #26115
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    Western Washington State
    Vehicle:
    2010 Silver dbl cab LB 4x4 It's Purdy too!
    LT265/70/17 BFG A/T's, Disabled Seat Belt Buzzer, Black and Gray Covercraft Seat Covers front and rear, Matching SnugTop Supersport Canopy, undercoat, bed mat, window vent shades. Black Weathertech Liners. Trans TSB, Rear Spring TSB Installed.

    Yokohama Geolander A/T-S is a great all around highway, light off road tire that would probably meet your needs. Reasonably priced too.
     
  12. Feb 17, 2011 at 12:27 PM
    #12
    trdr6

    trdr6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Member:
    #33640
    Messages:
    159
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Clay
    Greensboro, NC
    Vehicle:
    '10 TRD Off-Road 4X4 Double Cab Magnetic Grey
    AFE Stage II Si CAI, Raptor Series Straight Chrome Step Bars
    I'll be replacing mine with C's or at the most D's. E's are just more than I'll ever need but I hate the way my stock's (P metric) look slack when properly inflated. I'll probably go with Duratracks, you have to look but I've seen them available in C load range.
     
  13. Feb 17, 2011 at 12:28 PM
    #13
    borderbrat

    borderbrat Watching Chris4x4 o.O

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Member:
    #3480
    Messages:
    2,504
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jeremy
    Victoria BC, Canada
    Vehicle:
    2008, Black sand pearl, SR5, 4X4
    PIAA fogs, led "puddle" lights, bed lights, in cab 115V, Toyota Devil emblem, Randy Ellis light bar with Hella Black Magics, OME 885 and Dakar leaf springs OME shock all round, 2.5 Gal OBA system with air horns, iPod adapter, scangauge on blend mount, magnaflow catback, bike fork mounts, tinted 2009 tails.
    I have Firestone Destination A/Ts in load range C I picked them because of the extra ply and higher pressure capacity.
    I got into an argument once about how C rated tires are useless cause the weight rating on them is less than a P rated tires. BUT LT tires are derated because tire companies expect them the be loaded so they underrate them a little but where as P rated tires the max weight rating is all you got.
     
  14. Feb 17, 2011 at 1:06 PM
    #14
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    I've read good reviews on them as well, but I like the tread on the Geos and High Countrys better. I also prefer a simple design on the side wall. The hankooks got a little more going on than I prefer.

    But it's down to those three considering all factors (ride, some off-road ability and appearance).

    Thank you to everyone for the input.
     
  15. Feb 18, 2011 at 12:56 AM
    #15
    Yamaha Dave

    Yamaha Dave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2010
    Member:
    #34080
    Messages:
    2,662
    Gender:
    Male


    There is absolutely no need to step up to a D load tire for hauling a camper and gear on a Tacoma.

    Say for instance you are looking at a 265/75/16 tire, randomly chose a Goodyear Duratrac Load C range has a load index of 112, which is about 2,400 and something pounds PER tire. Multiply that by 4 = 9,600 lbs...basically a Load C is even more than our little Tacomas can handle.
     
  16. Feb 18, 2011 at 2:42 AM
    #16
    FoxySandChick

    FoxySandChick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Member:
    #9505
    Messages:
    2,963
    Gender:
    Female
    First Name:
    Kristin
    Henderson, NV
    Vehicle:
    07 DC 4x4 Base model V6 Impulse Red Pearl
    De-badged, limo tint, black wet okole's, weathertechs, extra d-rings, TSB bilsteins
    I have P rated all terrain tires, mostly highway and some minor offroading, they have held up just fine for 2+yrs.
    My gas mileage was not affected and my ride quality improved over the sloppy dunlops I had.

    I'd never go with D or E rated tires on a Tacoma. We have E rated on our Chevy 2500HD that we use for towing over 10K pounds and the ride quailty and gas mileage sucks, D rating would be just as bad.
    LT or C rated tires and also P rated all terrains are sufficient.
     
  17. Feb 18, 2011 at 3:01 AM
    #17
    chilean101

    chilean101 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2010
    Member:
    #30378
    Messages:
    29
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    ives
    ventura
    Vehicle:
    09 off road debadged
    Grillcraft mesh grill (top and bottom), Aries bullguard, shorty antenna, debadged, k/n cold air intake and air filter, 33 in bridgestone duelers a/t ,tinted windows all around, ddm 4500 lo/hi hid kit, webasto retractable moonroof, custom trd decals(scokmonkey), 3 inch revtek lift kit, led map and dome lights. super white fogs, newly added toyota OEM roof rack ,n-fab stainless steel side steps, chopped exhaust, full size trd anthracite spare tire . modded bike rack and spare tire rack mount(made by snobord 552)
    I've had bfg all terrains on my last Tacoma load range d ,even though they looked good they rode like shit (like a tractor), I then got passenger rated Michelin and it was way to soft a ride. Once I got my new truck I slapped on bridgestone duelers a/t load range c and they're great , Not too rough or too soft
    C is the way to go
     
  18. Feb 18, 2011 at 8:33 AM
    #18
    BryWi

    BryWi [OP] Psalm 109:8

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Member:
    #47177
    Messages:
    1,776
    Gender:
    Male
    Earth
    Vehicle:
    2011 TRD off-road DC SB w/JBL
    5100s, black valance
    With the research I have done, that was kind of my conclusion as well. I just wanted to throw it out to confirm, and get some opinions from owners like yourself that have actually had the different load ranges.

    Got a lot of great opinions depending on my specific use.

    Thanks
     
  19. Feb 18, 2011 at 6:09 PM
    #19
    KenLyns

    KenLyns Lord of War

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Member:
    #37674
    Messages:
    20,605
    Gender:
    Male
    Belly of the Beast
    Vehicle:
    4x4 TRD Off Road Full-Auto
    All-Pro Front Bumper, All-Pro UCAs, Icon ET Coilovers, Icon VS Rear Shocks, TSB Leafs, Timbren Bumpstops, CBI Sliders, ViAir Compressor, Klearz LED 3rd Brake Light, Pop-N-Lock Tailgate Handle, Husky Front Flaps, Deeza HD Sway Bar Links
    The stock TRD BFG Rugged Trails in 265/70R-16 are light (30 lb) quiet on the highway, and stable at high speeds. I've taken them to over 100 mph (uh, on a privately owned closed road course... :cool:) and the truck behaves better than my previous sedan. The total weight of a Rugged Trail tire together with a Konig Countersteer (18 lb) is lighter than a BFG All-Terrain tire alone. Something to think about if you don't plan on serious off roading.
     
  20. Feb 18, 2011 at 8:32 PM
    #20
    vermintrex

    vermintrex Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Member:
    #34153
    Messages:
    358
    Gender:
    Male
    Vancouver
    Vehicle:
    TRD SPORT Shorty
    BFG A/T KO 265/70/17, '11 FJ wheels, 5100's all four corners, Eibach springs, 1/4" Taco lean spacer, Leer 100XR, WeatherTech liners, trimmed mud flaps and I farted in it.
    My BFG A/T 265/70/17's are C rated. Just got 'em last year, don't think they're uncommon.

    Ride great.
     
To Top