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LOL Wasn't this the point?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by thebigk, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. Apr 28, 2010 at 8:42 PM

    thebigk [OP] 6 Double 5 3 2 1

    Aug 25, 2008
    First Name:
    Odessa, TX
    Damn you AZ...now they're coming to NM!!


    PHOENIX – Many of the cars that once stopped in the Home Depot parking lot to pick up day laborers to hang drywall or do landscaping now just drive on by.
    Arizona's sweeping immigration bill allows police to arrest illegal immigrant day laborers seeking work on the street or anyone trying to hire them. It won't take effect until summer but it is already having an effect on the state's underground economy.
    "Nobody wants to pick us up," Julio Loyola Diaz says in Spanish as he and dozens of other men wait under the shade of palo verde trees and lean against a low brick wall outside the east Phoenix home improvement store.
    Many day laborers like Diaz say they will leave Arizona because of the law, which also makes it a state crime to be in the U.S. illegally and directs police to question people about their immigration status if there is reason to suspect they are illegal immigrants.
    Supporters of the law hope it creates jobs for thousands of Americans.
    "We want to drive day labor away," says Republican Rep. John Kavanagh, one of the law's sponsors.
    An estimated 100,000 illegal immigrants have left Arizona in the past two years as it cracked down on illegal immigration and its economy was especially hard hit by the Great Recession. A Department of Homeland Security report on illegal immigrants estimates Arizona's illegal immigrant population peaked in 2008 at 560,000, and a year later dipped to 460,000.
    The law's supporters hope the departure of illegal immigrants will help dismantle part of the underground economy here and create jobs for thousands of legal residents in a state with a 9.6 percent unemployment rate.

    Kavanagh says day labor is generally off the books, and that deprives the state of much-needed tax dollars. "We'll never eliminate it, just like laws against street prostitution," he says. "But we can greatly reduce the prevalence." Day laborers do jobs including construction, landscaping and household work for cash paid under the table. Those jobs have been harder to find since the housing industry collapsed here several years ago.
    Standing near potted trees and bushes for sale at a Home Depot in east Phoenix, Diaz, 35, says he may follow three families in his neighborhood who moved to New Mexico because of the law. He says a friend is finding plenty of work in Dallas.
    Diaz says he has too much to lose by staying — he's supporting a wife and infant son back home in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, across the border from El Paso, Texas.
    "They depend on me to survive," he says. "I'm not going to wait for police to come and arrest me."
    Jose Armenta, a 33-year-old illegal immigrant from Mexico's western coast, is already planning to move to Utah within the next 20 days because of a combination of the economy and the new law.
    "A lot of people drive by," he says as he watched nearby cars speeding past, "and they yell, 'Hey, go back to Mexico!'"
    Analysts say it's too soon to tell what lasting effects the law will have on the state's underground work force, which also includes baby sitters, maids and cooks.
  2. Apr 28, 2010 at 8:47 PM
    steve o 77

    steve o 77 braaap

    Nov 29, 2009
    First Name:
    In a corn field, OH
    1990 Chevy Siveraydo
    245k+ miles, rust, working AC, bald eagles
    We need to follow AZ's lead.
  3. Apr 28, 2010 at 8:51 PM

    Snipe Well-Known Member

    Jan 9, 2009
    Pacific NW
    08 TRD Off Road
  4. Apr 29, 2010 at 12:39 PM

    nd Radical Town. It's a hell of a place!

    Mar 12, 2007
    First Name:
    Greenville, SC
    07 TRD Off-Road 4x4 debadged
    De badged, 5100's, Black Toyota Baja wheels
    lately when i read news articles i'm more pissed at the end than i was at the begining. its such a good feeling to read something and at the end go "awesome". its about time we started cracking down on illegals. hopefully more states will follow suit.
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