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Nitto Ridge Grappler Review

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by double dee, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. Mar 24, 2019 at 2:23 PM
    #901
    RobP62

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    Maybe that's why they never wear down?
     
  2. Apr 1, 2019 at 1:03 PM
    #902
    Prospetive_Tacoma

    Prospetive_Tacoma Well-Known Member

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    I just ordered a set of the 265/75/16 in C load. I'm hoping they fit and they're as good as everyone says they should be. I still can't decide on a sidewall though. Tempted to have one on the driver's side and the other on the passenger's side for awhile to decide.
     
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  3. Apr 1, 2019 at 8:23 PM
    #903
    RobP62

    RobP62 DCLBMAFIA

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    I have over 25k miles and swear these tires are magical.
     
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  4. Apr 2, 2019 at 6:21 PM
    #904
    Tbgreen89

    Tbgreen89 Well-Known Member

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    Let me know how the ride and mpg are. Are you on stock suspension?
     
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  5. Apr 4, 2019 at 11:11 AM
    #905
    Prospetive_Tacoma

    Prospetive_Tacoma Well-Known Member

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    I'm on a completely stock suspension, and nothing rubs. They look great too. I'll have to post a pic. The ride is really surprising. I'm coming from the OEM Wrangler Adventures, and the NRG's are just as comfortable. The only sitffness I noticed was under 5 mph. There is essentially no hum or tire noise, except a little at around 75 mph. Seriously, windows open with no music, I could barely hear the tires. I had a loaner with Nitto Trail Grapplers a couple weeks ago, and they were crazy loud; to the point of shouting at passengers on the highway. These tires really are nearly silent, and I didn't believe they would be. They handle nicely too. Cornering is stable and competent, as good as the OEM tires, anyway. They're nice and forgiving over bumps and potholes. I don't know about MPG yet, but I'll update when I do. I'll have them off road a little this weekend too, so I'll let you know how that goes.
     
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  6. Apr 5, 2019 at 2:52 AM
    #906
    bludweiaer

    bludweiaer Well-Known Member

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    avs rain guards,,,tyger auto tubesteps... stealth SR8's.265/70/17,ridge grapplers..shiftsense pro...
    they will get loud after about 10,000 miles, mine were quiet at first, but not anymore... they do wear really good, rotation time this morning,,
     
  7. Apr 10, 2019 at 6:58 PM
    #907
    gunsN'tacos

    gunsN'tacos Member

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    TRD PRO Grille TRD PRO 4Runner wheels BFG KO2’s 265/70r17

    I’d also love to hear some reports on overall MPG drop with the Ridge Graps. I’m in the market for some 265/70r17 tires and the Nitto Ridge Grapplers and Falken Wildpeak AT3w are both at the top of my list. Expecting the Ridge Graps to give a bigger hit to MPG, but if they perform as well as everyone reports it should be worth it.
     
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  8. Apr 11, 2019 at 12:31 PM
    #908
    Prospetive_Tacoma

    Prospetive_Tacoma Well-Known Member

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    I'm about two tanks of gas in, and so far, the Ridge Graps have reduced my MPG by about 0.5 mpg. I went from the stock Goodyear Adventures to a slightly larger 265/75/16 in the Nittos. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Still impressed with how quiet and comfortable they are. Look great too.
     
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  9. Apr 11, 2019 at 12:39 PM
    #909
    gunsN'tacos

    gunsN'tacos Member

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    TRD PRO Grille TRD PRO 4Runner wheels BFG KO2’s 265/70r17
    Alright I’m sold lol. I’ll also be going up in size slightly to 265/70r17 on my ‘17 Sport. I drive about 300-310 miles per week so anything nearing 4-5 MPG drop may have been a deal breaker, but a slight drop like this is a non issue and well worth the excellent looks and performance! Thanks for the quick response!
     
  10. Apr 11, 2019 at 1:38 PM
    #910
    gunsN'tacos

    gunsN'tacos Member

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    TRD PRO Grille TRD PRO 4Runner wheels BFG KO2’s 265/70r17
    Anyone know of any good deals on Nitto Ridge Grapplers? My tire guy can get them to me for $201 a piece, $848.22 with taxes shipped to my door. Seems like it’s a pretty great price but wondering if there’s even better deals out there.
     
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  11. Apr 11, 2019 at 4:15 PM
    #911
    RobP62

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    Nope, great deal!
     
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  12. Apr 11, 2019 at 4:18 PM
    #912
    RobP62

    RobP62 DCLBMAFIA

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    I have a roof mounted light bar and about 300 lbs of armor and an 80 lb tonneau. My average right now is 16.6 mpg. I drive a little aggressive and have the DCLB Sport, and run the same size tires. I run the E range.

    I don't think they are wearing correctly.

    There's no tread loss :D
     
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  13. Apr 15, 2019 at 8:07 AM
    #913
    CortezJB

    CortezJB Well-Known Member

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    How much of a lift??
     
  14. Apr 17, 2019 at 3:43 AM
    #914
    sgtnewundies

    sgtnewundies Well-Known Member

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    Working on it now....UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    I have both the Ridge Grapplers and the Trail Grapplers. My experience is totally different from yours. I find my Trail Grapplers are a little less noisy than the Ridge Grapplers. I have another 6 months of testing the Ridge Grapplers on the Tundra before I decide whether to replace my Trail Grapplers on the Tacoma with new ones or go with the Ridge Grapplers. Right now the slight edge for me is the Trail Grapplers.
     
  15. May 6, 2019 at 9:20 AM
    #915
    Knapz

    Knapz Well-Known Member

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    Just got these 285/70r17 SL mounted. Will follow-up in a few weeks.
    MVIMG_20190506_094215_1.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
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  16. May 14, 2019 at 4:33 PM
    #916
    PaulTac

    PaulTac Well-Known Member

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    Can you or someone school me on this? C load? I heard of something called LT but the C load? Also, I don't see many options when I search this size. I have an 18 tacoma sport, just want a decent all around, maybe light towing, nothing special. thanks.
     
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  17. May 14, 2019 at 7:45 PM
    #917
    09 Redneck

    09 Redneck Well-Known Member

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    Just looked on Nittos sight and they have the 265/70/17-115T listed at 43.65 lbs now..


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    Tire Overview
    The Ridge Grappler represents the next generation of the Nitto Grappler family of products which provides the best of both worlds from our mud-terrain and all-terrain product offerings. Featuring a revolutionary dynamic hybrid tread pattern, the Ridge Grappler provides a quiet and comfortable ride while the deep, aggressive sidewall lugs and tread pattern provide capable off-road performance.
    • [​IMG]
    17"

    LT255/80R17 E 121/118Q 217380 16.4 33.31 10.04 6.5-(7.0)-8.5 3195/2910 @ 80 54.96
    265/65R17 116T XL 217810 13.5 30.55 10.71 7.5-(8.0)-9.5 2756 @ 50 40.21
    265/70R17 115T 217940 13.5 31.65 10.71 7.0-(8.0)-9.0 2679 @ 44 43.65
    LT265/70R17 E 121/118Q 217100 16.4 31.65 10.71 7.0-(8.0)-8.5 3195/2910 @ 80 54.66
    LT285/70R17 E 121/118Q 217000 16.4 32.76 11.50 7.5-(8.5)-9.0 3195/2910 @ 80 57.89
    285/70R17 116Q 217710 13.5 32.76 11.50 7.5-(8.5)-9.5 2756 @ 44 48.74
    LT285/70R17 C 116/113Q 217010 16.4 32.76 11.50 7.5-(8.5)-9.0 2755/2535 @ 50 57.89
    LT285/75R17 C 117/114Q 217210 16.4 33.86 11.26 7.5-(8.0)-9.5 2835/2600 @ 50 65.08
    LT285/75R17 E 121/118Q 217200 16.4 33.86 11.26 7.5-(8.0)-9.5 3195/2910 @ 80 64.40
    LT295/70R17 E 121/118Q 217070 16.4 33.31 11.77 7.5-(8.5)-10.0 3195/2910 @ 80 64.72
    LT305/70R17 E 121/118Q 217080 16.4 33.86 12.24 8.0-(9.0)-9.5 3195/2910 @ 65 68.57
    LT315/70R17 E 121/118Q 217530 16.4 34.41 12.72 8.0-(9.5)-11.0 3195/2910 @ 65 70.83
    33x12.50R17LT E 120Q 217180 18.3 32.76 12.52 8.5-(10.0)-11.0 3085 @ 65 69.32
    35x12.50R17LT E 121Q 217020 18.3 34.76 12.52 8.5-(10.0)-11.0 3195 @ 65 75.45
    37x12.50R17LT D 124Q 217050 18.3 36.77 12.52 8.5-(10.0)-11.0 3525 @ 50 81.48
    37x13.50R17LT E 121Q 217450 18.3 36.77 13.58 8.5-(11.0)-11.0 3195 @ 65 87.04

























    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  18. May 14, 2019 at 7:45 PM
    #918
    RobP62

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    In the past, back when terms like Radial and Bias Ply were prominent in tire shops things were much easier to understand...............

    Tire Construction Methods
    The terms "Radial" and "Bias Ply" are used to describe the internal construction of a tire. The difference between them may seem small, but it has a significant impact on the way the tire performs.

    Tires are not just big rubber donuts. They are actually made by stacking layers of rubber and reinforcing fabric. Cotton was once used to reinforce tires, but now nylon, polyester, rayon, fiberglass, and even Kevlar are used. Each layer is called a "Ply". The difference between radial and bias ply tires is the way the plies are laid in relation to each other.

    Bias Ply Construction
    • The reinforcing cords are laid diagonally across the tire (usually 30° - 40° from the direction of travel), from bead to bead.
    • Each additional ply has the reinforcing cords laid at an opposing angle to the ply underneath it, creating a criss-cross pattern.
    • Most bias ply tires are 4 ply, meaning they have 4 layers of reinforcing fabric cords.
    • More plies = Stronger tires
    • 6 ply, 8 ply, and even 10 ply tires are available for heavier vehicles.
    • More rubber is then applied over the plies to create the tread.
    **One way to spot a bias ply tire is by recognizing the "Pie Crust" edge on the tread.**

    In a bias ply tire, the sidewall and the tread are both supported by the same reinforcing plies. This gives the tire certain characteristics.

    Radial Construction
    • The reinforcing cords are laid at a 90° angle from the direction of travel, from bead to bead.
    • Each additional ply is laid in the same direction as the one underneath it.
    • All the reinforcing cords run parallel to each other.
    • Reinforcing belts are added between the radial plies and the tread.
    • Belts are made from woven strands of steel, nylon, Kevlar, etc.
    • More rubber is then applied over the belts to create the tread.
    In a radial tire, the sidewall and the tread function as two independent parts of the tire. Radial tire construction has progressed since the early 1970's and has many benefits over bias ply construction.

    If you're wondering why you don't hear these two term that often it's because they are old and outdated. Nearly all car tires are Radial, and nearly all trailer tires are Bias Ply however.

    Here's even more info.............

    Light Truck Tire Designations - Examples
    The term "Light Truck" covers great variety of vehicles, such as vans, SUV's and light duty pickup trucks. This is one of the reasons why the tires are labeled in many ways. It is also important to know what sizing system is applied in a tire designation.

    There are several sizing systems for the light truck tire designations currently in use:

    1. 1. LT-Metric
    2. 2. LT-High Flotation
    3. 3. LT-Numeric
    4. 4. European Commercial Metric
    5. 5. P-Metric and
    6. 6. European Metric
    Tires for light truck applications can be classified in two groups:

    • Tires specially designed for the light trucks
    • Passenger car tires applied on the light trucks
    Tires specially designed for the light trucks
    • LT-Metric light truck tires
    • LT-High flotation light truck tires
    • LT-Numeric light truck tires
    • Euro commercial metric ("C" tires for vans)
    • Euro commercial numeric ("C" tires for vans)
    LT-Metric Tire Designation
    If a size designation begins with the letters "LT", it means that a tire is LT-Metric (Light Truck-Metric), designed for the light truck vehicles with load carrying capabilities usually of 3/4 and 1-ton.

    Light truck tires have the load range codes in a size designation (B, C, D and E) that shows the tire load and inflation pressure limits.

    Examples:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    LT-High Flotation Tire Designation
    "LT" at the end of the designation denotes that tire is LT-High Flotation, Wide Base or LT-Numeric.

    The term "flotation" means that tire is capable to pass over the soft surfaces (e.g. loose sand, soft soil or mud) without sinking in. These tires "flotate" on the top of soft surfaces.

    Flotation tires are usually slightly larger than the other tires used on light trucks and require a wider rim/wheel.

    [​IMG]

    LT-Numeric Tire Designation
    "LT" at the end of designation shows that a tire is capable to carry higher loads and tow heavy weight. These tires are designed for the medium and heavy-duty light trucks, some SUVs and full-size vans.

    Examples:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Euro Metric Commercial Tire Designation ("C" tires for vans)


    [​IMG]


    Euro Numeric Commercial Tire Designation ("C" tires for vans)
    [​IMG]

    Passenger car tires on a light truck
    • P-Metric passenger car tires applied on the light trucks
    • Euro-Metric passenger car tires applied on the light trucks
    In many cases new light trucks and SUVs are coming with the P-Metric or Euro-Metric tires as the original equipment (OE). Although they are not specially designed for the light trucks almost 80% of all OE tires on the light trucks and practically all SUVs in USA are the P-Metric.

    Here are some examples of the size designations for these two groups:

    P-Metric Passenger Car Tire Designation
    The letter "P" in front of the size designation shows that a tire is designed for the passenger cars but label without the "P" letter implies that the tire is the European metric - intended for passenger cars.

    [​IMG]

    Euro-Metric Passenger Car Tire Designation
    Keep in mind that the P-Metric and the Euro-Metric tires in the same dimension are not equal and they are not fully interchangeable. They have differences in the load and inflation features particularly if they are used on a light truck.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. May 14, 2019 at 8:33 PM
    #919
    RobP62

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    Continued......

    Nitto will tell you though if you call them, that both their C load range and E load range tires have the same amount of plys, that they are just laid out differently. That's why the two weigh nearly the same. They told me at the time I bought mine 2 years ago that they listed the E load range as 10 ply because that's what people understood more easily.

    So then I asked them about the rubber compound. Nope, the same.

    They did tell me the E load range plus were laid out in such a way to increase the sidewall strength which in turn makes them more suitable for heavier towing and bed cargo loads.

    All tires have a load rating. So do wheels. The max we can tow, when properly equipped is 6,500 lbs. That's the cargo of the trailer. Not how much in the bed. But the math is simple. Add the weight of the truck, including all cargo and passengers, + the max trailer tongue weight (10% of that 6,500 lbs), or 650 lbs, then take that total and that is the max weight that 4 tires can safely support. So if you look at the C load range (x 4 tires) and the E load range (x 4 tires) and as long as those are more than your max load weights, you're good.

    Right, I know the E load range tires have more rated load carrying capacity than needed but when your towing at the max at extreme speeds you should have that added strength.

    Now, a long time ago, a guy much smarter than me explained that since E load range tires are designed to hold more air (PSIs) that the downward pressure of the tire is greater at the contact patch than the same size contact patch of a lesser PSI tire.

    I'm no aerospace engineer but I do have enough sense to know that since people have been off roading they have been letting the air out of their tires to some extent. Why? Because flatter tires change shape and the contact patch gets larger. More rubber on the surface of terra firma will always provide more traction. It also allows the tire to conform to the shapes of rocks etc.

    So I fell like a stronger sidewall tire deflated will always be better than one that's softer.

    So you would most definitely be happy with a Nitto Ridge Grappler with a C load range but there's absolutely no reason not to get the E load range.

    There's a saying that applies to just about anything. "It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it".

    Hope this all helps you some @PaulTac
     
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  20. May 14, 2019 at 8:44 PM
    #920
    Thunder Fist

    Thunder Fist Well-Known Member

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    Like, so many.
    I’ve had both. The NTGs are definitely quieter on road. No question. I recommend those tires a lot. But for me, it’s the NRGs all day. I was trail riding this weekend and it’s been really rainy here and those things cleared mud incredibly well.
     
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