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Question on Rocker Switch Amperage and Voltage

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Tunngavik, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Aug 25, 2011 at 7:30 AM
    #1
    Tunngavik

    Tunngavik [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I would like to install heated seats in my truck and with that would like to install an on-off-on rocker switch.

    From what I’ve read online from various people who have installed the seats, the seats take between 3-5 amps each and are typically hooked up under to a 10 amp fuse in the box to the lower left of the driving column.

    Now here is my question, I found some rocker switches that maybe would do the trick (look good, fit in the space I want them to, and are 3 post) but I’m not sure if they will work electrically. The rocker switches have the following values – 18A 125VAC and 10A 277VAC. Do you think these will work considering the amperage required for the seats and the 12V battery of the truck?
     
  2. Aug 25, 2011 at 9:06 AM
    #2
    Fodder4U

    Fodder4U Well-Known Member

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    Simple solution is to run them through a relay (that's the way anything with a higher amp should be run to begin with).
     
  3. Aug 25, 2011 at 9:14 AM
    #3
    Tunngavik

    Tunngavik [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply. The heated seats do have a relay with them that is run/are connected to the switch location so you figure this replay would suffice?

    I'm more concerned about the switch - the VAC listed in the switch specifications is volts AC - I'm assuming that would work for DC as well?
     
  4. Aug 25, 2011 at 9:15 AM
    #4
    D4D Hilux Dude

    D4D Hilux Dude Well-Known Member

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    I've generally had bad luck using AC switches for DC voltages. Could be I got a bad batch...

    I agree with Fodder to use a relay. A 10 amp fuse may be a bit low if each seat is going to be drawing 5A. I think you may need a bigger fuse (and beefier wires) to supply power to the seats.
     
  5. Aug 25, 2011 at 11:57 AM
    #5
    Tunngavik

    Tunngavik [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Fog lights with OEM switch - Heated mirrors with OEM style switch - Cab sound deadening - Lighted 4x4 switch - URD short shifter - Rear backup camera - 2012 rear view mirror (compass, outdoor temperature and backup video mirror) - Heated seats - 2014 Tacoma stereo install - Bluetooth with OEM steering wheel controls, Access roll-up tonneau cover
    I've found 2 - 10 amp slots in the fusebox to power the seats.

    Interesting that you had trouble using AC switches for DC applications. I'm going to look this up and see if I can find anything.
     
  6. Aug 25, 2011 at 12:21 PM
    #6
    Fodder4U

    Fodder4U Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a plan. If you are running the power to through the relay to the switch there should be no issues. Don't forget to add some pics when done including the wiring.
     
  7. Aug 25, 2011 at 12:30 PM
    #7
    Tunngavik

    Tunngavik [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Fog lights with OEM switch - Heated mirrors with OEM style switch - Cab sound deadening - Lighted 4x4 switch - URD short shifter - Rear backup camera - 2012 rear view mirror (compass, outdoor temperature and backup video mirror) - Heated seats - 2014 Tacoma stereo install - Bluetooth with OEM steering wheel controls, Access roll-up tonneau cover
    Looks like I found some more info on the following sites.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080723204231AAuEopj

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090615011743AAahe5F

    Basically what they said is that you can use an AC switch in DC applications but you have to ensure that the AC switch has a higher amp and voltage rating due to the differences in AC vs DC current.

    The AC current alternates while the DC current does not thus there is more stress on the electrical system (e.g. the switch) in a DC system. As long as the AC switch is double rated (e.g. if the DC load required is 5 amps and 12V you should have a 10 amp 50 V AC switch).
     
  8. Aug 25, 2011 at 12:31 PM
    #8
    cummins6speed

    cummins6speed Well-Known Member

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    Those switches should work just fine. How do I know? I'm an electrician. Make sure your wire is sized correctly for the load and the fuse is sized for the wire.
     
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