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Rebuilding Rear Leaf Springs. Viable option?

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by mjhenks, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. Apr 6, 2010 at 12:16 PM
    #1
    mjhenks

    mjhenks [OP] Well-Known Member

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    In researching for the Wheelers group buy i just can not leave a stone unturned.

    I have noticed a few comments in the many leaf pack threads about rebuilding the leaf pack instead of replacing. (Talking stock OEM, no lifts or major of road packs) I found a few post saying they were thinking about it but no-one who actually posted they did it.

    Since my money tree refuses to produce bills with zero's at the end i have to ask is this viable?

    I have spoken to a few of the big name shops about axle wrap. Eventually the conversation came around to re-arching/rebuilding. they said they could ra-arc and add another leaf and yield somehting better then but similar to a OEM replacement leaf pack. Mind you that these shops also sell the stock OEM packs and i did NOT mention i was trying to save a buck. Just told them i want to eliminate axle wrap w/o a major lift and that i was not going off-roading or anything like that.

    So... To round out the discussion...

    Has anyone had their leaf pack rebuilt?
    Had them re-arched?
    Had another leaf added to old pack? (Not AAL's)

    Pro's i can think of:
    - save some money

    Con's i can think of:
    - working with already sagging springs.
    - unsure if re-arching really does not weaken the spring.

    Thanks for the input.
     
  2. Apr 6, 2010 at 12:41 PM
    #2
    STLharry

    STLharry Lube: It's the key to penetration.

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    IMO, go with the wheelers group buy. Taco springs are notorious for being weak and I think you should just replace them
     
  3. Apr 6, 2010 at 3:17 PM
    #3
    Wreckless_71

    Wreckless_71 WRECKLESS for Life...

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    3" Lift via OME 881's, Bilstein 5100's, Dakar OME 3" leaf packs, MBRP custom exhaust, HID headlights, CB, Canopy, aluminum wheels, upgraded sound system, full set of studded snow tires and wheels, auxilary lighting, more to come.
    Bump... I'm wondering the same thing man. Has anyone built a bastard pack or does anyone know of stockers that could be swapped in off another rig?
     
  4. Apr 6, 2010 at 3:25 PM
    #4
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    Back in 2000 (or some where around that time), I had my leaf springs re-arched on my 96 tacoma. At the time - there wasn't any replacement paks available. I wanted 2" of lift.

    I had the original leafs re-arched, had 2 custom (with matching arch) leaf springs added (total of 4+overload). This was all done at the local spring shop. It cost somewhere in the $300+ range.

    When it was finished (and new), I ended up with 3" of lift, which it did settle down to 2" - which is exactly what I wanted.

    The ride was definately a lot more harsh than the stock springs. THat's to be expected .....it's a truck. The leaf pak was heavy duty as hell. You could barely move it when you jumped up/down in the bed. It laughed at hauling a scoop of mulch without any sag.

    Axle wrap......what axle wrap? The tires spun....and spun....

    At the time - 10 years ago, it was the cats ass. Now? It's probably costs way too much to have this done versus what a new aftermarket pak would cost. But, that's something you'd have to research....
     
  5. Jun 4, 2010 at 5:37 PM
    #5
    raycie

    raycie Well-Known Member

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    In need of $$$
    Curious.. OP what did you end up doing? I am researching right now a re-arch / aal combo, as my leafs are flat, and shipping to hawaii sucks ass..
     
  6. Jun 5, 2010 at 6:58 AM
    #6
    mjhenks

    mjhenks [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I ended up going with new leaf's from Alcon. I spoke to Deavers at length. They made it all seams reasonable that the leaf pack could be re-arched without damage but i could not get my head around why the leaf pack once flat would not either have memory or damage. I opted for a new pack and the group buy made the most sense. Have yet to find time to install the pack but that is the path i am on.
     
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