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Securing volatile cargo

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Neural, Sep 28, 2010.

  1. Sep 28, 2010 at 8:29 PM
    #1
    Neural

    Neural [OP] Member

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    I'm still a bit unfamiliar with the best way to do some things with the tie-downs and rails in my Tacoma, and the time has come for me to make a trip to AirGas to have my oxy-propane torch tanks refilled.
    State law requires these to be transported in an open vehicle, such as a pickup, so carrying them around inside is not an option.
    The tanks I have are a 20lb oxygen tank, and a 5lb propane tank, and they have a steel caddy they both fit in.
    What I'm looking for is potential methods of properly securing this for transportation using the standard rail system and tie downs in the truck bed. I've considered building a custom caddy for the tanks, but it still leaves me with the problem of the whole unit sliding around in the truck bed, which is ... problematic.
    Has anyone else transported this type of equipment, and if so, what method did you use to secure it properly?

    Below is a picture of the caddy and the oxygen tank.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks.
     
  2. Sep 28, 2010 at 8:34 PM
    #2
    AKTACO420

    AKTACO420 Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you put the caps on the tops its a 10000 dollar fine were I live.
     
  3. Sep 28, 2010 at 8:45 PM
    #3
    Ammo guy

    Ammo guy Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend lying them on their sides with 4X4 dunnage at the shoulders and bottoms. Then nail down 2X4 blocks on each 4X4 at the width of the tank. This will prevent them from rolling and sliding. If you are worried about them bouncing just wrap a tie down around all of them at the mid section. This is what I have seen done for scuba tanks. Same concept just on a smaller scale.
     
  4. Sep 28, 2010 at 9:35 PM
    #4
    Neural

    Neural [OP] Member

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    Not sure how that one works with the oxygen tanks here other than the large ones. This 20lb one doesn't have the threads on the neck for one of the caps you are talking about, unfortunately. The 5lb propane tank has the guards on it already. it's more or less a small version of the 20lb ones you see on BBQ grills.

    I'm not to worried about how to deal with the tanks, I know what I'm doing in that respect. What I am trying to figure out is how to keep the caddy or any unit I build for them from sliding around.
    It would seem like I'll need to build a caddy that has wood rails on it that run the length and width of the bed in order to prevent any issues.

    If that's the case I think I will see about hardware to install on the rails so that they can be adjusted to serve similar purposes with larger objects.
     
  5. Sep 29, 2010 at 10:28 AM
    #5
    scottri

    scottri Well-Known Member

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    Stolen from Scubaboard but it works and it's cheap.
    you can then use a tie down over the top to keep them from sliding around front to back. I use this method to transport scuba tanks all the time.

    Here's my homemade tank rack idea. I looked at several manufactured sets at various stores and couldn't see spending the same cash to hold only 2 tanks.


    Materials include:

    1 20' section 1.5"PVC (irrigation) pipe.

    16 1.5" PVC end caps.

    1 small can of PVC pipe cement.

    1 package (50') nylon rope.

    1 can rubber tool handle dip.


    Simple assembly:

    Cut the pipe into sections about 16-18 (I use 1/2 to 2/3 the length of the tank as a rough rule) inches long. 4 pieces for a three tank rack, 3 for a two tank rack.

    Drill 2 holes through each end of the cut pipes. Drill only one hole in each end of the pipes which will be used for the end pieces. Make the holes just large enough to thread the rope through (leave enough intact pipe at the end for the cap to fit).

    Tie a knot in the end of the rope and feed it through the single hole of the end pipe, leaving the knot inside the pipe. Thread the rope through a hole in the next pipe, so the rope protrudes out the end of the pipe. Adjust to proper length (use a tank) and mark the rope. Pull the rope through the end of the pipe and tie a knot in it. Allow the knot to slide back into the pipe as you feed the rope out the hole on the other side of the pipe. Continue this procedure until you get to the other end pipe. Tie a knot in the end, cut the slack off, and tuck the knot into the pipe. Repeat this process for the rope at the other end of these pipes.

    Glue a cap over each end of all of the pipes. Allow PVC cement to cure for about 30 minutes before the next step.

    Dip each capped end of each pipe into the rubber tool handle dip. Allow to "set" for a short time before dipping again. I dipped mine 3-4 times to get a thick rubber coat covering each end cap completely.

    Total time to make both sets was about 2 hours.
     
  6. Sep 29, 2010 at 11:49 AM
    #6
    Fortech

    Fortech Well-Known Member

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    Put the caddy against your closed tailgate. Run a ratchet strap through it to the tie downs on either side of the bed. Tighten tie downs. This will hold it snug against your tailgate.

    The front would be more appropriate if you have tie downs added up front.

    This shouldn't take any additional money or excessive time to figure out. I believe they should be transported upright as well.
     
  7. Sep 29, 2010 at 5:08 PM
    #7
    Neural

    Neural [OP] Member

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    Fortech: I will see how that might work out. I need to buy some ratchet straps anyway as it is.

    And yes, the tanks should always be transported in an upright position. *especially* Acetylene
     
  8. Sep 29, 2010 at 5:10 PM
    #8
    2TRunner

    2TRunner Don't give up here just yet

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    Securing volatile cargo....

    ...thought this might have been a thread about what to do with your girl when she gets in your truck.
     
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