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Sleeping bags

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Bennett707, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Mar 8, 2013 at 7:44 PM
    #1
    Bennett707

    Bennett707 [OP] Yeti Hunter

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    Curious as to how many people spend that much on sleeping bags, I can't believe they can cost up to $600. Crazy.

    Did you buy an expensive sleeping bag?
    Was it worth it?




    Currently browsing REI and holy sheeeet.
     
  2. Mar 8, 2013 at 7:53 PM
    #2
    Fiend13

    Fiend13 Well-Known Member

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    Years ago when I use to camp in cold weather I had a mummy bag and it was perfect cause retained all of my body heat and kept me warm. I think I paid around $200 for it? Now that I live in a desert I just use light blankets on an air mattress. But yeah it is pretty crazy how expensive they can get.
     
  3. Mar 8, 2013 at 7:59 PM
    #3
    thairannosaurus

    thairannosaurus Well-Known Member

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    i got this after i lost my sleeping bag that got issued to me and for 70 bucks it's pretty awesome. i slept pretty comfortably in 40 degree weather and that was with just the inner liner. being from texas, i probably won't get the experience to tell you how it handles in 10 degree weather unfortunately, haha plus it's pretty durable. i've gone on many a ftx's with it and it's still holding strong.

    http://www.rangerjoes.com/1-PHENIX-GEAR-Modular-3-in-1-Sleeping-System-P3810.aspx
     
  4. Mar 8, 2013 at 8:23 PM
    #4
    TherealScuba

    TherealScuba Well-Known Member

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    I have an alpine bag. 10 degree mummy bag. Its been pretty nice the past couple years. Its starting to itself at the zipper. Not much I can do about that.

    For the $65 I paid for it I think I got my time out of it.
    Most likely I'll use it until it literally won't seal.
     
  5. Mar 8, 2013 at 8:46 PM
    #5
    kai38`

    kai38` Well-Known Member

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    A good well built sleeping bag could save your life.
    Down bags are great I use a 20 degree bag year round along with a down comforter in the winter. You have to be extra careful to keep a down bag dry, when its wet it will not insulate.
    They have come out with new synthetics that pack down but if you are car camping space may not be an issue and also insulate pretty good.
    If it's a cold night wear dry, clean wool socks and a knit cap to be to help retain body heat.
    Which ever bag you get get a good stuff sack for it to keep it clean. Don't get into it with dirty clothes on, it will last longer and insulate better.
    An insulated ground pad will also make a difference
     
  6. Mar 11, 2013 at 11:44 AM
    #6
    The Woodsman

    The Woodsman Well-Known Member

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    Some good tips here. - - - > http://risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=16510&highlight=sleeping+bag

    Sleeping bags vary greatly and there aren't regulations for testing and rating. I've read in the past that you want to shoot for a rating 30 degree below the temp you will be camping in. In other words, if you'll be out in 30 degree F temps you will want a 0 bag. Of course, liners will affect how that all works out and whether or not that is a primo bag or a cheapo may make a difference too since there are no standards.

    One note on the socks is that they should be loose fitting so they don't inhibit circulation.
     
  7. Mar 11, 2013 at 11:58 AM
    #7
    kryten

    kryten Well-Known Member

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    I have this one, North Face Superlight 0F/-18C down bag. Paid $280 in 2008.

    http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog/ca_ecom/engear/superlight_2.html

    I used it a few nights while winter camping in 3F/-16C. After two nights I was done as it was moist from touching the condensed tent wall. It is more of a three season bag for me since I did not do a whole lot of winter camping since.

    If I was doing it again I would probably get this MEC -20C bag for $100 less. Being a hybrid and not full down bag I would think I would not have to be so careful trying to keep it dry.

    http://www.mec.ca/AST/ShopMEC/Sleep...5-643/mec-phoenix-hybrid-sleeping-bag-20c.jsp
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2013
  8. Mar 11, 2013 at 12:05 PM
    #8
    otis24

    otis24 Hard Shell Taco

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    I have a 17 year old LL Bean down rectangle bag that I got for $210. It was a 20F bag, now it's more like a 40F bag. In addition to that I have a -5F marmot never summer mummy bag. It was miss labeled for $175...shoulda bin around $400. I've used it down to -15F with a liner and it's mighty comfy. It's also a bit under 3 pounds so pretty light. It has a decent shell that keeps some moisture off if I get condensation or ice crystals that break off the inner walls of my tent.

    What it comes down to is what are you going to use your bag for? I do some winter camping and climbing in the Sierra so a lightweight bag that will keep me warm below zero is vital. I take extremely good care of that bag and no one else is allowed to use it. I never loan it out. I have a black diamond hi light tent with a vestibule. The two combined weigh less than 3 pounds and can take some serious wind. The tent and vestibule were about $500 combined. It's a lot, but if you're gonna go to 12K or 14K feet in the winter that stuff will help save your life.
     
  9. Mar 11, 2013 at 12:11 PM
    #9
    gooch14

    gooch14 Well-Known Member

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  10. Mar 11, 2013 at 12:46 PM
    #10
    Bobbb

    Bobbb "Rumors of Bob, but never Bob. It is Bob, right?"

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    I have a light-duty bag for summer camping (with a wool blankie as backup if it gets too cold) and a mummy bag for winter. I paid $45 for the mummy at Target 10 years ago and it still works like a charm. Entirely too hot for anything other than butt-ass cold winter use. I just hauled it out looking for a name brand and there isn't a tag so I can't help with that. $600 for a sleeping bag?--Absolutely not.
     
  11. Mar 11, 2013 at 1:03 PM
    #11
    Alaskan toy

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    REI does pretty good with their rating, they use both a "comfort" rating and a survival rating. When you're in the survival temperatures you won't be comfortable, but you'll get through the night.

    A good quality bag is handy to have, I've got a Wiggy's and they're great quality. I've used mine in 30 below (in a non-winterized RV) and been plenty comfortable. Sucks getting out of it in the morning though.

    I've also used the overbag in the 40s and it's great; I'm loving the modular system. AND it's half the price of a comparable REI bag which doesn't have the adaptability.
     
  12. Mar 12, 2013 at 5:43 AM
    #12
    squamish VFR

    squamish VFR Well-Known Member

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    I always recommend you spend good money on the sleeping pad. I bought an X-Ped mat and am thankful I did. My MEC bag is worth about half what the mat is but I was cozy in the snow cave. Also remember to include a toque.
     
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