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Soldering Irons

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by DanGer, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. Jun 11, 2009 at 6:43 AM
    #1
    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    Hey guys. I have soldered extensively before, but it has always been on stuff that doesnt matter. Now that I have some plans for my truck I was wondering a few things before I get one.

    What is the implications of higher wattage and temperature? Would 25W at 900* be enough for most small electronics projects?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Jun 11, 2009 at 6:59 AM
    #2
    98tacoma27

    98tacoma27 is gooder 'en chicken Moderator

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  3. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:03 AM
    #3
    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    Damn I can't afford that lol. Thanks for the advice. I am just looking for a basic one to get me through a few LED projects
     
  4. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:11 AM
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    98tacoma27

    98tacoma27 is gooder 'en chicken Moderator

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    A simple one from radio shack will suffice for that. Just make sure you get flux. I would also suggest getting a few different sized tips.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:14 AM
    #5
    98tacoma27

    98tacoma27 is gooder 'en chicken Moderator

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  6. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:18 AM
    #6
    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    All I worried about now is making sure a fine tip is included. Do you have to get a flux iron?
     
  7. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:20 AM
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    98tacoma27

    98tacoma27 is gooder 'en chicken Moderator

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    Flux is something you use in conjunction with the solder. It cleans your tip and insures a clean joint.
     
  8. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:23 AM
    #8
    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    ok thats what i though but i wanted to make sure it wasn't like flux in welding :)
     
  9. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:26 AM
    #9
    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    One more question...should I go with a cordless, butane powered one for work in my truck, or should i stick with a corded one
     
  10. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:27 AM
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    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    it serves the same purpose. Flux for soldering usually comes as a paste that you apply before you start.

    I generally use just the pen type soldering iron, but if I'm impatient, I'll get out the gun to speed the process along.
     
  11. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:28 AM
    #11
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    I've never used cordless of butane. I'm happy to have a never ending supply of power.
     
  12. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:29 AM
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    98tacoma27

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    The butanes are nice for portability and access. They have them cheap at Radio Shack also. If you will be doing a lot of work in the truck, the butane may be the way to go, no wire to fumble around. I don't have any experience with the butanes though.
     
  13. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:30 AM
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    DanGer

    DanGer [OP] Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    One of my projects will be to try out an LED swap for the map lights so I was wondering if the butane would be more handy in that situation. However I foresee much many more mechanical issues with them seeing as they have to ignite fuel to operate
     
  14. Jun 11, 2009 at 7:45 AM
    #14
    bobwilson1977

    bobwilson1977 Well-Known Member

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    I restore a lot of antique tube powered radios and use a plain 40 watt soldering iron with a couple of tips. I like sharper tips for most projects. I also have a crappy 25 watt weller that does just ok. It takes twice as long to heat up.
     
  15. Jun 11, 2009 at 8:19 AM
    #15
    afd23a

    afd23a Well-Known Member

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    I've used a butane iron before and they work fairly well. I'd get one of those iron holders like what comes with the weller shown above so you don't burn the crap out of yourself. For some reason, using a butane iron always seemed weird to me b/c there was no cord attached to it. For that reason I prefer an electric one like above. However, there are some times when it is definitely more convenient to not have the limitation of the cord, like working in a truck or other field applications. As far as brands go, I've used Weller, Hakko, Tenma, Edsyn, and Radio Shack brands. They all worked well except for the Radio Shack one, but other people say they've worked fine for them.

    IMO, if you're going to use it a lot in the future get a good iron. The tips and the iron will last longer and be easier to obtain parts for.

    EDIT: That black and decker above does look like a pretty good deal. For comparison, here's an Edsyn used by almost every company I've worked for http://www.newark.com/edsyn/951sx/soldering-station-loner-reg/dp/92F8585
     
  16. Jun 11, 2009 at 8:39 AM
    #16
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    I've heard that the butane irons heat up faster, can anyone confirm this?
     
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