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Spark Plugs in 2002 4 cyl 4WD

Discussion in '4 Cylinder' started by GoldBeachBiker, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. Apr 4, 2010 at 10:46 PM
    #1
    GoldBeachBiker

    GoldBeachBiker [OP] Member

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    Could someone answer once and for all, are the factory installed 100K iridium plugs good for 100K miles or not? Why do the dealers want to replace them after 30K miles? For those of us concerned with whether or not the factory installs the INITIAL plugs with anti-seize - do they or don't they? Finally is there really an issue with leaving steel plugs in an aluminum block for 100K miles or not? Do I really risk breaking or stripping threads after long use?
     
  2. Apr 5, 2010 at 12:54 PM
    #2
    Barnone

    Barnone Guest

    You only have 30k on your 2002 4WD? Want to sell it?:D
    Dealer want to replace the plugs at 30k because they make money on the deal.
    I don't think my plugs were iridium but I have the 2.4l and you have he 2.7l.
    I replaced mine at 60k and they looked in very good condition. Didn't make any difference in MPG or performance.
    Don't know about the anti-seize from the factory but I used it when I replaced the plugs.
     
  3. Apr 5, 2010 at 5:50 PM
    #3
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    The first gens dont have iridium plugs. They need to be changed at 30k. Also, YES>...There will be an issue if you dont install anti sieze on the plugs before installing them.
     
  4. Apr 6, 2010 at 10:21 AM
    #4
    DGXR

    DGXR Well-Known Member

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    aFe Pro Dry air filter, magnetic oil drain plug, synthetic seat covers, steering wheel cover
    But... does anyone know if the plugs on the 2.7 are installed with anti-seize at the factory? Coming up on 50k on my 2006, wondering if I should pull them just to make sure they don't weld themselves to the alum head.
     
  5. Apr 6, 2010 at 5:06 PM
    #5
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    Yes.
     
  6. Apr 6, 2010 at 9:27 PM
    #6
    GoldBeachBiker

    GoldBeachBiker [OP] Member

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    Thanks for the help, everyone. After talking with three dealers, the concensus is that a 4 cyl 1st generation tacoma comes with standard copper plugs, not platinum or iridium, and are installed WITH antiseize compound. Putting in anything else MAY trigger false computer reads, and give you warning light issues. Sounds bogus to me, but I will stay with coppers nevertheless. Price really isn't an issue here. Can anyone guide me to a pictorial or photo assist that shows how to remove all that crap that's in the way of your plugs and coils? Couldn't find anything, anywhere. The Toyota FSM is worthless in the way of pics.
     
  7. Apr 6, 2010 at 9:54 PM
    #7
    GoldBeachBiker

    GoldBeachBiker [OP] Member

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  8. Apr 7, 2010 at 5:57 AM
    #8
    Barnone

    Barnone Guest

    The plugs are a pain to change the first time. Once you do it then not so bad. The stock plugs seem to do the job so I stuck with them.
    Good for you on finding the excellent write up on changing the plugs. It would have helped me when I did mine.
     
  9. Apr 11, 2010 at 12:58 PM
    #9
    GoldBeachBiker

    GoldBeachBiker [OP] Member

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    The Japanese are great at devising little clips, the removal of which, seem to defy logic. Has anyone here encountered any difficulty in removing the little clips that hold the engine wire along the intake air connector? or must they simply be cut and replaced. The removal, or moving out of the way, of the intake air plenum is unfortunately necessary in order to remove the number three spark plug. Photo/diagrams are atteached

    IMG_4345.jpg
    4-11-2010 12-50-09 PM.jpg
     
  10. Apr 12, 2010 at 6:00 AM
    #10
    SigSense

    SigSense Well-Known Member

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    I installed the NGK Iridium plugs in my 1st gen, and have had no problems. They've been going for about 70K miles so far, and recently checked them. Next tune up I'll install some new ones.
     
  11. Apr 12, 2010 at 6:38 PM
    #11
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    Useing a pair of Needle nose pliers, you should be able to squeeze the part that attaches to the air box, and remove it. Its a press fit, with an "Arrow" shapped connector. Squeeze the connector, and it will release.
     
  12. Apr 12, 2010 at 9:25 PM
    #12
    GoldBeachBiker

    GoldBeachBiker [OP] Member

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    Thanks, Chris .......... super helpful. :)
    Sometimes the smallest things interfere with getting a simple job done.
     
  13. Aug 29, 2011 at 2:11 PM
    #13
    nonnie56

    nonnie56 New Member

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    To GoldBeachBiker
    I've had my truck since March 2003. It had 13k miles on it. As far as I know it had never had a tune up on it and it had over 200k miles on it before the plugs went. Why you ask did it go this long? I had a boyfriend that was a mechanic, and my current husband is a mechanic, they never worked on my truck although I asked them to replace the plugs, they assumed that because the truck ran so good that I had platunium plugs. When they did finally go at over 200k miles, the techician said there was nothing left of them. But to answer your question, yes they can go over 100k.
     
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