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Steelies or Aluminum wheels?

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by tmat, May 28, 2009.

  1. May 28, 2009 at 2:46 AM
    #1
    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    So I was talking with a buddy of mine about wheels today. I told him how I wanted to get the Konig countersteer offroad wheels and I was boasting how much they weigh and that they're aluminum and what not when he told me that steel is better then aluminum When it comes to offroading. He said that aluminum will just break (because it is more brittle)but steel will bend. Is this true? And if it is then why don't I see steelies on every truck? They're cheap and strong???? help
     
  2. May 28, 2009 at 3:03 AM
    #2
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    If you go offroading a lot -I'd go with some black rockcrawler wheels. Various companies make them and they're only like $60 each. You can thrash them around, rub 'em up againest rocks & such and not worry about ruining a good expensive set of wheels.

    I've had the same set of rockcrawler wheels on my jeep. They've been on my jeep for like 6 years and they've been beat to hell. I've had to replace 2 of them - one had a minor bend in it (bent at center) to cause a vibration at 60mph and the other was bent extremely at the center (along with a bent axle flange & twisted splines on my axle shaft). I've also had one that got dented in pretty good - a few good whacks with sledge hammer put it back into shape.

    The whole point with the steal wheels (especially the black rockcrawlers), is because they're CHEAP to replace when you ruin 'em.
     
  3. May 28, 2009 at 11:48 AM
    #3
    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    so what is the downside of aluminum wheels offroading? Even if they're the Konig Countersteer OFFROAD I'm just curious if my friend knows what he's talking about.
     
  4. May 28, 2009 at 3:45 PM
    #4
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    I dunno, never had alluminum wheels for offroading.

    What type of offroading do you do? Are you climbing around on rocks & rocky terrain?

    If you're running around on rocks & stuff - the only downside to alluminum wheels that I know of - is the chance of scratchin 'em up, gouging the edges, etc. It'll be hard to keep them looking 'nice' and expensive to replace if you ruin one.

    Did you ever think about getting a second set of wheels/tires for offroading?
    Keep a good alluminum (or whateve) set of wheels/tires for the street and get a cheap-ass set of steal wheels with mud tires for offroading.
     
  5. May 28, 2009 at 5:42 PM
    #5
    johnecon2001

    johnecon2001 Well-Known Member

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    Entirely depends on how well said rim is made. Steel wheels can crack just as easily as aluminum ones can if they're using a crappy method to manufacture them.
     
  6. May 28, 2009 at 5:47 PM
    #6
    DanGer

    DanGer Avatar approved by 98tacomav6

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    Also aluminum is supposedly stronger but it breaks instead of bends. Steel is supposedly weaker but you can pound it back into shape.

    Here is a question I have been wondering about. I know from experience with our farm equipment that if you heat the steel up to bend it back, it loses some strength. Is that the case with pounding bent steel back or no.
     
  7. May 28, 2009 at 11:39 PM
    #7
    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    alright so basically Steel wheels are the ones that are just the run of the mill black or chrome ones that don't look special, weigh a bunch and they can be bent back into shape given that they are well made. Aluminum wheels are the ones that look really cool, are lighter but are much more expensive and can break and not be bent back into shape?
    So is this (generally speaking) a true statement? And if it is then I'm going steel baby!
     
  8. May 29, 2009 at 1:09 AM
    #8
    RelentlessFab

    RelentlessFab Tacoma offroad armor fabricating beast Vendor

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    yeah, aluminum is more expensive, lighter, and looks better, but they can be easily gouged on rocks and stuff and would crack if you tried to pound a flattened lip back, etc. Steelies are cheap, dont look as good, but you can beat on a flattened edge until its back into shape.
    If they're going a rig intended to spend alot of time offroad, then i'd get steel, if the truck spends the majority of the time on the street and looks are important, then get alumimum and just be a little careful not to gouge/scrape them on rocks.
     
  9. May 29, 2009 at 1:29 AM
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    snowtaco

    snowtaco Well-Known Member

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    unless your goin all out off roading you could make it on alum and because they are lighter they will help with mpg thats how i see it.. it sucks that steel is so much cheeper tho
     
  10. May 29, 2009 at 4:22 AM
    #10
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    If you want a good cheap offroad wheel...I highly recommend a black rockcrawler wheel.

    [​IMG]
    15x8
    $60

    Search around, for better prices. There's a few manufacturers that make the same type.
     
  11. May 29, 2009 at 9:37 AM
    #11
    Kyouto42

    Kyouto42 Iron Beard

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    I thought 16 was the smallest we could go on 2nd gen... due to the caliper size.

    Otherwise, yea pretty much what 'they' said.
     
  12. May 29, 2009 at 11:07 AM
    #12
    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I'm actually getting this exact wheelset, but 16x7 and white for $260
     
  13. May 29, 2009 at 11:10 AM
    #13
    headhunter247

    headhunter247 Well-Known Member

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    $260 for the set? or a piece?
     
  14. May 29, 2009 at 11:24 AM
    #14
    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    The set.
     
  15. May 29, 2009 at 9:52 PM
    #15
    blknblubkrdude

    blknblubkrdude Well-Known Member

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    The only advantage a steel wheel has over an alloy wheel is the cost.

    Breaking an aluminum wheel when wheeling is a non-issue. Don't even think about it.

    You are more likely to get stuck on the trail with a flat if you use steel wheels. The lip on the steel wheels are much more likely to be damaged and let the air out.

    An alloy wheel will save you a lot of unsprung weight, which will increase the performance and longetivity of your truck in all ways.
     
  16. May 30, 2009 at 6:42 AM
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    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    That's a non-issue.

    1) Spare tire
    2) If you carry a good set of tools/equipment/onboard air, it can be fixed.

    I've dented mine plenty of times - nothing a good whack with a mallet can't fix. One paticular dent/bend that I experienced, required dismounting the tire and several good whacks with a mallet. Ratchet strap to help mount it and onboard air to pop it into place. I've also had big chunks of wood shoved into the bead of my wheels/tire - and they still held air. The wheel/tire combo I had was VERY forgiving.
     
  17. May 30, 2009 at 7:17 AM
    #17
    blknblubkrdude

    blknblubkrdude Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the wheel can be repaired or replaced with a spare, but you are still considered "stuck" until you repair it.
    If you are wheeling in deep powder, in the winter, that is one of the last things you want to happen. It is a very dangerous situtation.

    Just fork out the extra money for alloys and you won't have to worry about pounding out the dents.
     
  18. May 31, 2009 at 2:50 AM
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    tmat

    tmat [OP] Well-Known Member

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    um...if I had a spare what difference would this make? I think I'm going with the steelies
     
  19. May 31, 2009 at 5:21 AM
    #19
    Rippin101

    Rippin101 Well-Known Member

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    Thats what I have ;)
     
  20. May 31, 2009 at 6:42 AM
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    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    My $0.02.......Personally, on our trucks, Im happy with aluminum. I have been beating aluminum wheels for over 10 years with no issues. The Konigs are a quality wheel, and many people run them off road with no problems. If you hit any wheel on the rocks, issues are bound to arise.
     
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