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Tacoma Lift FAQ/Guide - READ THIS

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by Khaos, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. Mar 19, 2013 at 10:40 AM
    #481
    4Wheelin4Banger

    4Wheelin4Banger Longtime Toyman

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    Randy
    Ferntucky, NV Halfway between Reno & Falabama
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    3" OME lift 885s & Dakars riding on 33" KM2s Click the sig pic to see the build thread .
    Save up buy the whole lift at once (with extra $ for UCAs) get it aligned & see if you need new UCAs.
     
  2. Mar 21, 2013 at 10:24 AM
    #482
    YOTA LOVER

    YOTA LOVER Stay Calm, and Fire For Effect

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    2011 MGM Tacoma DCLB SR5
    3" OME lift (HD), LR UCAs, All-Pro Sliders, All-Pro APEX Front Bumper w/PIAA 530 Fogs, All-Pro Skidplate, 1" diff drop, vent visors, OCTaco Braided Lines, baby seat (forward-facing)
    What I found with the OME kit on my 2011 is that there is no NEED for UCA replacement or new brake lines. I would certainly recommend getting the steel brake lines upgraded because it is a smart move, and get them 1-2" longer than stock to account for the lift and have plenty of slack to play with. Only going up 2" or so doesn't really mess with the stock geometry, so your alignment should be pretty straight forward.

    You can throw in the Total Chaos (or similar) UCA for good measure, but I feel it is overkill at that lift height. If you're going to go higher at a later time than it could be a good investment now.

    I installed the diff drop just to ensure that at full extension I wasn't stressing the CV joints on the half shafts. Again, the geometry isn't too far out with a 2" lift, but I opted for safer over sorry approach. I'm running the All-Pro full skid, so I don't have to worry about exposing the diff.

    I'm not sure what they're talking about with the new bushings on the front shocks. The OME springs and shocks (up front) just drop right in. It's not like having to compress the spring to get it out of the strut or anything. If you decide to go w/new UCA than you should certainly upgrade the stock bushings on the LCA while you've got the front end torn apart. It took a lot of pounding on my gen 1 to wreck the stock LCA and UCA bushings, but when I did there was hell to pay.

    I honestly have no idea what the top plate spacer is. The only spacer I had to install was at the drive shaft bearing because I have the 4 door w/ 6' bed, thus the longer drive shaft.
     
  3. Mar 21, 2013 at 12:29 PM
    #483
    Cwpick76

    Cwpick76 Well-Known Member

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    Blacked out badges.

    Can you give me info on the brake lines and LCA bushings; where to buy, what to look for?

    I was told that with the full 3" lift I should get UCA that will allow for angle at full extension, and since I am looking to be able to do more fast-paced off-roading get shocks with remote resevoir (ICON/KING/FOX). lot of brands and models for the shocks wasnt sure what to look for on those either. I don't plan on doing full out racing off-road, but if I get it out to desert or an area where I can open it up I wanted to make sure the suspension would take the abuse.
     
  4. Mar 21, 2013 at 2:01 PM
    #484
    DoorDing

    DoorDing Thank you, Nancy Roman

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    The most important thing about LCA bushings and alignment cams appears to be applying a heavy coat of thick grease before they begin to rust. If there's a source for greasable LCA bolts, I'd probably order today.

    There are lots of UCA options that allow extended travel. Some are designed to correct alignment issues after a lift, and some use a uni-ball instead of a ball joint. It sounds like you're heading for an extended travel shock, so you'll want a UCA that can take advantage of that travel. One of the less expensive options is the Light Racing UCA, made by SPC. It uses a ball joint with an extended travel range, corrects for alignment issues, and can be found for around $375. FWIW, this is my parts list.

    Downsouth Motorsports (DSM) is a popular retailer on TW, and they carry Icon, King, and Fox shocks at competitive pricing; they also have a TW discount. Take a look at their site for some options.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013
  5. Mar 21, 2013 at 2:18 PM
    #485
    Cwpick76

    Cwpick76 Well-Known Member

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    awesome, thanks.
     
  6. Mar 22, 2013 at 11:36 AM
    #486
    YOTA LOVER

    YOTA LOVER Stay Calm, and Fire For Effect

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    ^What he said. I'm a big fan of All-Pro Offroad, so here is a link to the extended brake lines they offer:

    https://www.allprooffroad.com/tech-info-mainmenu-63/model/05-tacoma-mainmenu-113/brake-upgrades

    Here are the All-Pro UCAs:

    https://www.allprooffroad.com/05tacomafrontsuspension/05upperaarms

    You want a rebuildable setup for the ball joint on the new UCA. After a few years dirt and grime get in there and wear them out.

    You can see the polyurethane bushings that come with the kit. You'd want a similar product for the lowers. A bunch of companies make them. Sometimes they get squeeky, so proper lubrication is in order.
     
  7. Mar 24, 2013 at 4:00 PM
    #487
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    Hi folks -

    I bought my truck used a little less than a year ago and am dealing with a motor mount that broke last week. Actually, it's the frame under the motor mount.

    Getting set up for the repair and reinforcement of the frame has got me started thinking about the lift the truck came with. It's a 2005 DC Off-Road V6 4WD 6 speed, and I like how the lift looks, and thought it drove fine until the fan started hitting the shroud this week.

    I live on a gravel/dirt road that is sometimes pretty rough, and have to travel it 2 to 6 times a day. It's about 3 miles of gorgeous, fairly unimproved road. I do need the clearance the tires and lift give. I've got 285/70/17's.

    So this is the current lift kit as per the records I got with the truck. It was installed in January of 2010:

    Daystar KT09116BK (front spacers)
    Skyjacker Add-A-Leaf RTC515
    Skyjacker SP-Shocks H7045.
    Monroe Sensa-Trac Struts 71371

    So these are some of the questions I have after reading this WHOLE thread:
    What about my CV angles? How do I tell if they are okay?
    How about the control arm bushings, tie rod ends, and ball joints?
    Did this lift need a differential drop kit but not get it?

    Have I been beating the crap out of my suspension without knowing it? From reading this thread it seems to me that I very well may have a lift that looks good but that hasn't been doing the truck any favors given where I live, and that I need coilovers with better shocks, maybe upper control arms, and a maybe a brand new leaf pack for the rear plus different shocks in the rear.

    I've been looking at the Old Man Emu kits. I've got to pay for the repair and reinforcement of the frame at the motor mounts first, but I wonder what those of you with lifts who live in gorgeous out-of-the-way places like I do think about what I've got on my truck now, and what direction you'd go. I think I'd LIKE a long-travel kit, but that's not going to happen. A long-travel kit costs way too much for me though I think there would be times I'd use it even in my daily life.

    I think the current lift is 3 inch, but I'm not sure. Trucks not here right now, but a pic is in my sig.

    Looking forward to hearing any of your ideas about the replacement lift I should be saving for. Now I'm off to read the OME thread, all 50 pages of it. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Mar 24, 2013 at 5:16 PM
    #488
    DoorDing

    DoorDing Thank you, Nancy Roman

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    blackbrit, do you have any idea how many miles/years are on the old lift? What's your budget for a new lift? The more you want to spend, the more options you'll have, but you don't have to spend several thousand dollars for a good 2"-3" lift. Long Travel may be overkill, but a Mid Travel setup may be within your budget and accomplish your goals.

    Old Man Emu (ARB) is a popular brand that may work for you. A Bilstein lift is another option. Lots of threads on both, and there are obviously a lot of other options.
     
  9. Mar 24, 2013 at 5:49 PM
    #489
    banditstpk

    banditstpk Pabst knows best

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    deck plate, led lights interior, center hubs painted black,
    so whats the difference between progressive and normal coils?
     
  10. Mar 24, 2013 at 5:57 PM
    #490
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    3 inch lift
    Hi DoorDing -

    it's just a little over 3 years old. It was done in January 2010. My best estimate for miles is 46K. There isn't a mileage note on the sales slip from the shop that did the lift. The closest receipt is for tires the next month, and that receipt says 64K. The current odometer reading is a little over 110K, about 6 or 7K of which I put on myself. I think the previous owner was on paved roads more than I am, but I don't know.

    I have a budget of $0 :mad: right now, as I don't know what the labor will be for the frame repair, and I'd rather spend no money at all at the moment. Having said that, if I had loads of money I'd love to spend it on the truck, and even more importantly, I'll take care of it if I need to make a change in the lift to avoid further destruction of my truck :confused: I have been looking at the mid-travel option, just like you say, to replace what's there.

    What is the OME 885 with the Dakar leaves considered to be?
     
  11. Mar 24, 2013 at 6:06 PM
    #491
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    3 inch lift
    And thanks for the link. Now I'm reading TWO humongous threads! But really, thanks. That and the OME thread are helping to educate me a lot.
     
  12. Mar 24, 2013 at 6:41 PM
    #492
    DoorDing

    DoorDing Thank you, Nancy Roman

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    Even if you decide against using OME parts, I think you'll find several people in that thread to help guide you. I'd suggest taking your time and figuring out what you want to do, and the best way to get there. You may find that some of the parts you already have will work fine (or well enough) with some new parts, saving you some money. I don't know anything about your current lift, but you can try using TW's Search to learn more about it.

    BTW, make sure your shop is thoroughly inspecting the frame and crossmembers for rust problems. Better to find them now than later.
     
  13. Mar 24, 2013 at 6:50 PM
    #493
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    I've been worrying about that. It may sound stupid, but how do I actually get a good inspection? Not that I'm not under there plenty myself. My '98 went bye-bye last spring in the Toyota frame rust buyback program. I had this frame inspected before I bought it... and here I am with the 2005 infamous weak frame at motor mount issue.

    Sorry for getting off-topic. But it is on my mind.
     
  14. Mar 24, 2013 at 6:56 PM
    #494
    banditstpk

    banditstpk Pabst knows best

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    nevermind found my answer

    7. What is the difference in progressive and linear springs?

    Linear
    Well linear spring theoretically keep the same spring rate regardless of stroke.
    If you have a 6kg/mm linear spring, if you compress it 10mm it should only take an additional 6kg to compress another mm. Therefore, if you compress a linear 6kg/mm spring with 60kgs of force, it will compress 10mm.

    Linear Spring Characteristics
    The benefit of a linear spring is consistency, meaning the weights transferring from side to side should be very smooth and consistent. After getting use to the car dynamics, drivers can anticipate weight transfers and body roll more accurately. While exiting a corner, a linear spring will return the body in a smooth manner because both sides are compressing and rebounding at the same rate, which keeps one mm of expansion to one mm of compression throughout the traction of the springs. This reduces the demand for excessive counter steering, which can result in fish tailing. For winding roads driving, this has great benefit and allows for more confident use of weight transferring because the driver won't experience unpredictable weight shifts.

    Progressive
    Progressive springs are springs that gradually increase spring rate as the spring compresses. So, if the spring starts out with a 6kg/mm spring rate after 50mm of compression it may then measure 17.75kg/mm.
    Using the above example a 6kg/mm linear spring will take 300kg to compress 50mm while it will take 594kg to compress the progressive spring.

    Progressive Characteristics
    Say you are cornering with these progressive springs, you have compressed your outside spring by 50mm (a little over 2"). While you are exiting the corner the centrifugal channeled inertia (the force that causes body roll during cornering), reduces, allowing the body roll to stabilize. You now have an outside spring that has stored 17.75kg/mm of force. As the centrifugal inertia reduces, it throws the outer side of the chassis up with 17.75 kilograms per/mm of force, roughly 950lbs/ inch of force.

    Since suspensions are designed to keep the vehicle level that force throwing the outside of the chassis up will be partially transferred to the opposite side. But the outside spring has not compressed during cornering so it will absorb the transferred energy at 6kg/mm of compression so for the first mm the outside releases, will translate to almost 3mm of compression on the inside. As the outside spring releases the excess energy and the inner springs absorb it, the ratios gets closer to 1:1, it may even change back and forth. This is excessive body roll requiring more attention and finesse to effectively control. While negotiating chicanes it can make steering extremely complex and demanding compared to what linear spring would produce. Please use the chart below to see the differences in the linear and progressive spring characteristics. .
     
  15. Mar 24, 2013 at 7:02 PM
    #495
    DoorDing

    DoorDing Thank you, Nancy Roman

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    This should brighten your day:

    2005 tacoma 2nd gen terminal frame rot rust cancer

    An automotive shop probably won't perform any formal Non-destructive Testing, but they can tap and probe the frame to check for weak spots, and maybe poke a borescope into some semi-enclosed areas. If rust is a concern for you, there are several threads on rust preventative measures. I applied Fluid Film to my 2012, but it's too soon for me to report its effectiveness.
     
  16. Mar 24, 2013 at 9:48 PM
    #496
    jacobblocker

    jacobblocker Active Member

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    east tennessee
    billet grill, black out emblems, procomp 7089, hankook dynapro 265/70/17
    Question

    I'm gonna buy some 2" coil spacers to level my truck how do I my coils off to get them on pics would be nice
     
  17. Mar 25, 2013 at 6:53 AM
    #497
    YOTA LOVER

    YOTA LOVER Stay Calm, and Fire For Effect

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    If you're talking about a Gen 1 or 2 Tacoma you need to pull the struts off the truck and bring them down to a shop so they can safely compress the spring and add in your spacers.

    My two cents: I originally used spacers to get lift on my 95 (when I didn't know any better) and regret using them. They compress the spring and stiffen up the front. That's cool if you want to stay on pavement, but it's not so cool off road when you need some more flex. I was much happier with adjustable coil-overs, which also allowed me to perfectly level the truck.
     
  18. Mar 25, 2013 at 2:21 PM
    #498
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    EEEEck! You are so very thoughtful, my friend. And of course I bookmarked it.
     
  19. Mar 25, 2013 at 2:22 PM
    #499
    blackbrit

    blackbrit Well-Known Member

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    What coilovers did you get?
     
  20. Mar 26, 2013 at 8:19 AM
    #500
    YOTA LOVER

    YOTA LOVER Stay Calm, and Fire For Effect

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    I wish I could remember. I sold the truck in the fall of 2011 and picked up my new Taco. At the time money was an issue, so I think I went with some subsidiary company like BDS or Zone. If I were to do it again I would replace the UCAs and have gone with the All-Pro Bilstein Coil-Over. For the money it's a pretty solid way to get 2-3" of lift out of the IFS and maintain alignment.
     
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