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Tire and offroading advice

Discussion in 'Off-Roading & Trails' started by gmh16, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:23 PM
    #1
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    Hi all,

    I am new to the world of 4x4's and I have a question about offroading. I have a 2011 4cyl access cab 4x4 with the stock dunlops. I am about to start a season of field research in northwestern California. We get a lot of rain almost all of the time. The forest roads that I will be on will most likely be mildly to very muddy and my truck will be loaded with traps and gear. I will not be doing any serious offroading other than this. My question is will the stock dunlops be fine for the trails? I am a poor college student and I don't have a job at the moment because of the research that I have to do. I don't really have the $800-1000 to replace the tires with some A/T's. Just asking for some advice on this subject.

    Thanks!!!!!
     
  2. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:27 PM
    #2
    CopDoctor

    CopDoctor Well-Known Member

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    stock dunlops will get you there, but if it's very muddy like you say, there's a good chance you'll get stuck a few times. i'd look around on craigslist, you can get used A/T and M/T tires for much cheaper than new
     
  3. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:28 PM
    #3
    Yoytoda

    Yoytoda The Little Truck That Could

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    stock tires are bad in mud...

    Do the yellow wire mod and it will help you not get stuck :)

    i would spent that 800-1000 or try anyway. it will be worth it in the long run. If you can find a local shop who carries Hurcules tires (cooper subdivision) their M/Ts are about 700 for a set. Or you could try the wrangler authority sold at walmart for pretty cheap.

    welcome to the offroading world
     
  4. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:39 PM
    #4
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    I'm also not looking for anything crazy regarding the tires. I would like something that does well for mild offroad situations but is also good on pavement. I have been looking at firestone destinations (what do you think of these?). It is really hard to find a store that sells anything for cheap where I am as it is pretty remote (or at least this is their excuse to jack up prices).
     
  5. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:45 PM
    #5
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    also,

    any tips/advice as far as offroading goes? I have been off the beaten path quite a bit in my old '97 4runner 4X2 (but also got stuck in the mud a lot as well).

    I am mainly worried about getting stuck in the mud and any tips for driving in the mud would be helpful.

    Thanks again!
     
  6. Mar 7, 2011 at 10:59 PM
    #6
    StandingCow

    StandingCow Well-Known Member

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    Bring a shovel with you, and try not to lose momentum.

    The goodyear duratracs are good on pavement as well as mud.
     
  7. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:07 PM
    #7
    David K

    David K Well-Known Member

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    My vote goes to:
    Hankook Dynapro ATM
    Toyo Open Country AT
    Cooper Discoverer ATR

    I have had all three... just got the Hankooks and am loving them after testing in snow, mud and desert sand. The other two I had on my 2005 Taco and they were good... All three were quiet on the highway, too!
     
  8. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:10 PM
    #8
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    Is $810 out the door for toyo open country (4 ply) a good price? This is from a les schwab dealership nearby
     
  9. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:13 PM
    #9
    David K

    David K Well-Known Member

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    Differential Breather Mod Light Bar: 2 Hella 4000 HID, 1 Cibie Halogen. Bilstein 5100s Ride Rite Air Bags
    Yes, adjusting air pressure is everything when you loose traction (tires spin instead of drive). In sand or snow, if you stop moving forward, stop and deflate your tires way down 10-15 psi. Have a good dial type air gauge and an electric pump to re-inflate the tires (the kind the clips onto the battery is better than the kind that plugs into a cigarette lighter (for speed). Get a tire plug repair kit... go you can plug a hole, then fill the tire back up with your pump. Mud is a nightmare... if you can't avoid it then go into L4 and power through it. The 4 Lo Trac (Yellow Wire) mod will give you traction control (limited slip) in low range, as you do not have the Off Road TRD with A-TRAC in L4.
     
  10. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:15 PM
    #10
    David K

    David K Well-Known Member

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    Nope... $700 is more of a good price... keep shopping (however, it has been a few years since I bought those) and look at Hankook ATMs.
     
  11. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:21 PM
    #11
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    Thanks for the replies and advice!!

    I don't know of any tire place that sells Hankook where I am located. I will look around although I am still leaning towards keeping the stock tires on and hoping for the best (I am poor).

    Would I still want to air down when stuck in mud?
     
  12. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:31 PM
    #12
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    also,

    doesn't the yellow wire mod void the warranty?
     
  13. Mar 7, 2011 at 11:34 PM
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    Yoytoda

    Yoytoda The Little Truck That Could

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    it shouldnt. if you do it right you can just put it back. nobody would even know the difference
     
  14. Mar 8, 2011 at 4:03 AM
    #14
    maxamillion2345

    maxamillion2345 Go home if you don't like guns liquor and whores.

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    http://humboldt.craigslist.org/pts/2180261709.html


    If you can't afford NEW tires, try those.

    Another option are heavy v-bar chains for your rear. If you stick to the road, even if it's pretty muddy as long as there is a bottom you should be able to go anywhere with the chains.

    I'd also carry emergency gear, a shovel, straps, and gloves. Make sure you have solid recovery points.

    Deflating will help, on rough roads it will also smooth the ride. Remember though you can ruin a set of tires by running them at low psi on the pavement. You'll need to re-inflate them at some point.


    Here is what my local 4x4 forum recommends for our runs:

    Recommendations For Being Prepared On The Trail
    It seems like every week lately there is a new thread on someone who is stuck and in need of help. With a little bit of planning these situations can be avoided. I recommend taking/doing the following when you are headed out to wheel. Most of these items are required if you go on an organized run like Sierra Trek or Jeeper's Jamboree, so you will already be ahead of the game.

    Bring-
    Tow Strap- A winch is great, but a strap can get you out of most situations if you have someone else to give you a pull.
    Tow Hooks- A strap is no good if you don't have anywhere to hook it. Don't wrap the strap around suspension or steering components, use actual tow hooks and D-rings.
    Hi-Lift- You can use it to change a tire, lift a corner of the vehicle to put rocks in a hole, or even drive over them if you don't have anything else to use. Be careful though, next to your winch a Hi-Lift is one of the most dangerous tools on your vehicle. Always leave the handle in the up position when the jack is stationary.
    First Aid Kit- These are cheap and don't take up much room. Hopefully you never need it, but if you do need it nothing else will do.
    Fire Extinguisher- These are cheap and don't take up much room. Hopefully you never need it, but if you do need it nothing else will do.
    Fullsize Spare- You need a spare tire and the ability to change your tire. Also, if you don't have on board air periodically check the air pressure in your spare to make sure that it is ready when you do need it.
    Water- We live in the desert, so water is important all year round. Whether you need it to drink, for your radiator, or to wash off a muddy windshield, water is scarce in Nevada but necessary. I carry two one-gallon containers. They cost less than a buck each.
    A Friend!- It isn't smart to go out alone if you are going into challenging terrain. Often times a simple tug from another vehicle is enough to get you unstuck. At the very worst, you can hop in the second vehicle and go get/call help.
    A Plan- Everyone loves last minute wheeling trips, but take the time to make a quick call to let someone know where you are going and when you are going to be back. Ideally you would call a friend who has a built rig with a winch, so if you get in trouble they can come rescue you. Of course you need your phone (and service) in order to call them for help.

    Winter wheeling brings its own set of additional requirements. You can spend the night on the Rubicon in the summer rather comfortably, but I wouldn't recommend it in the winter unless you are totally prepared.
    Snow Shovel- A shovel doesn't work as well as a winch, but it will allow you to get out of most situations with a little work.
    Hi-Lift Base- In the snow your jack is going to want to go down instead of your vehicle going up. A piece of wood spreads out the load so the jack won't sink.
    Sleeping Bag- If you do need to spend the night, or if your passenger gets cold, you need to keep warm.
    Energy Bars- You burn a lot of calories keeping your body warm and it is important to replenish them.
    Change of Shoes and Socks- Nothing is more miserable than cold, wet feet. Bring along a second pair of shoes and socks, but wait until the recovery is done to change them. Or change back into your wet shoes if necessary. I know that sucks but it is worth it to keep one pair dry.

    I wrote an article for Off-Road magazine that has even more thorough suggestions regarding tools and parts. You can read it here:

    http://www.off-roadweb.com/tech/0801...ist/index.html


    Read up on basic recovery, tire chains, and off road driving.


    I can't tell you how many unprepared rigs I've run into out on the trails, stucker than shit and completely unprepared.

    Anything from bald tires, to lack of shovel, to lack of recovery points or straps or a chain, to no emergency gear or no water.

    Several of the rigs I've seen would have been okay if they had had a shovel to dig, decent tires or chains, and a basic idea of how to get out. Instead they're still sitting out there, a solid month later, buried up to the windows in snow. I would have helped them out even but their owners were no where to be found.

    Stay safe out there.
     
  15. Mar 8, 2011 at 12:41 PM
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    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    Thanks for the advice!

    I might call the guy you suggested on craigslist to see what those tires look like.

    Thanks again
     
  16. Mar 8, 2011 at 12:48 PM
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    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

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    Those craigslisters look pretty bald to me - about where I'd personally replace an "off road" tire.

    But aside from that, +1 on the good advice in this post.

    EDIT - also, you claim "broke" but you're sporting a new 2011. So you've got some money somewhere. Really, for the use you describe, I'd upgrade my tires from the stockers. You should e able to sell your stockers for at least 50 bucks a tire or so.
     
  17. Mar 8, 2011 at 12:58 PM
    #17
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    I had some money from doing some "T.V. work" when I was a child. I am no longer a child and no longer do "T.V. work" so no more money. The money was going to pay for some college, but sadly fell victim to terrible the terrible stock market. I could either pay an insignificant portion of my student loans off or I could buy a vehicle that would last me 10-20 years.

    That is my long winded way of describing my being broke.

    Do tire dealers usually buy the stock tires or would I have to sell them to a 3rd party?
     
  18. Mar 8, 2011 at 2:38 PM
    #18
    maxamillion2345

    maxamillion2345 Go home if you don't like guns liquor and whores.

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    They might buy em back for very little money.

    CL is likely your best bet.
     
  19. Mar 8, 2011 at 6:33 PM
    #19
    gmh16

    gmh16 [OP] Active Member

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    Had another question.

    I have never used a come-along. I am wondering what the procedure is on using these to get unstuck when alone.
     
  20. Mar 8, 2011 at 7:08 PM
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    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

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    The more I think about it, the more I think you should just keep your stock tires and get two sets of tire chains, as well as some recovery gear.
     
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