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Tire Size and Winter: Should I be concerned?

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by BGrutter, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. Sep 13, 2010 at 7:33 PM
    #1
    BGrutter

    BGrutter [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I searched, but this is a rather specific topic, so I'm sorry if I missed a thread that covers this.

    I think I just might be convinced to get 285/75/16 when the time comes. However, I was wondering if anyone noticed any appreciable difference when going to such a large tire in the snow/ice. Of course, the primary concern is the width.

    With my '94 Ranger (4" Suspension/2" Body), I had 33x12.5 BFG T/As on 15x10 rims. Though I never really noticed much of a difference, everyone asked whether I slid around on the Ice. I always told them "Not that I'd noticed", but it's probably a valid point.

    So there's my question: Am I going to encounter a NOTICEABLY increased likelihood of drifting on the snow/ice? I do realize that those tires were wider and having a 10" rim compared to the 8" I will likely get. However, I'm still wondering what those that have gone before have experienced.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Sep 13, 2010 at 8:23 PM
    #2
    BrokenTusk

    BrokenTusk I support a velociraptor free workplace.

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    You shouldn't, I'm from Far north Alberta, Canada. So I drive 7-8 months worth of winter driving every year. Wider tires = better contact patch on the ground, meaning you'll have more traction. I think whoever told you that big tires slid where those talking about big mud and rock tires, they have a harder rubber. You need a softer rubber in order to grab the Ice and snow easier.

    Thats my experience, gone through about 8 full sets of tires. (I lay alot of rubber)*

    Side note: X-runners are dropped 1.5" inches in suspension, whats the biggest size winter tire I can get for that?

    *In a closed course in mexico
     
  3. Sep 13, 2010 at 8:29 PM
    #3
    MountainEarth

    MountainEarth Well-Known Member

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    Depends on your snow. Out here in CO where the snow is really dry and fluffy. you just cut right through, and I prefer a tire with a smaller contact patch (more pounds per square inch of pressure). So I run 265s. Last year I took out a 2009 Tacoma with 285s and it definitely didn't do as well in our conditions because it couldn't get a good bite. On icy snow - aka Sierra Cement, or what they see up in NE, it may be a whole different story.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2010 at 8:37 PM
    #4
    Simon's Mom

    Simon's Mom Wag More Bark Less

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    I use a narrow tire 245s in the winter. I actually went to a studded tire because the back end kicked out a lot in the short bed & we tow a lot in the mountains.
    In deep snow a wider tire will plow/push/float where a narrower tire will cut through. If you do not see deep snow I would not see a problem. Not sure about ice, as said, a softer compound tire or studs is best in my experience.
     
  5. Sep 13, 2010 at 8:45 PM
    #5
    Snowman

    Snowman I have a problem for your solutionÂ…

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    narrower is better for snow. Thats why they used snowshoes, bigger area so you didnt sink in. You want to sink down to the pavement in a vehicle
     
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