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Towing Cross Country 4cyl 4x4

Discussion in 'Towing' started by rydaniels, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. Apr 5, 2012 at 5:33 PM
    #1
    rydaniels

    rydaniels [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Ryan
    South Jersey
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    I want to get some input on my tow. The short of it is I am renting a 6x12 tandem axel uhaul trailer for my 2010 reg cab 4x4 (4cyl). The the trailer is 1900lbs unloaded and in it will be a queen-sized bed, couch, a desk (taken apart) and a small-ish round table. I dont imagine the payload for the trailer exceeding 1000 lbs. Anyone have experience towing moderate loads with their 4 cyl 4x4? My understanding through the forum is that because of the 4x4 I have a better suspension and bigger brakes compared to non 4x4. The truck is a manual so no tranny issues in terms of overheating ( like an auto) The drive is from southern NJ to Peoria IL (roughly 900 miles). Im expecting to be driving 55-65 mph. How does does the truck feel with regards to power, acceleration and how well it will handle? Also there will be some odds and ends (like tools) in the bed and more than likely a 17ft canoe on the ladder rack I installed on the truck. Any input is appreciated.
     
  2. Apr 5, 2012 at 7:23 PM
    #2
    Robertgeejr1

    Robertgeejr1 Well-Known Member

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    Aorora, Ill, yeah!
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    I have done all the hi-pro mods for a life time, since I got this truck at a great price, I will be happy with showroom new.
    the most important thing is to take your time, and take it easy. fast starts, and braking hard will get things hot, quick! and thats not good. I would make sure the truck was serviced, with the best, and take your time.
    and make sure its all loaded right. with the uhaul, when its loaded the noise of the trailer should be flat, or better just a little up. and a 4x4 is better since the hitch is a little higher, makes it easier to tow. never pull a 2 axle if the noise is way down, that means your are riding on the front axle of the trailer and it will sway and weave, the real axle has to force to keep it pressed to the road.
     
  3. Apr 5, 2012 at 8:08 PM
    #3
    rydaniels

    rydaniels [OP] Well-Known Member

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    South Jersey
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    bone stock except tool box in bed

    thanks for the input...planning on taking 2 days to do they leg....I usually do it in a day (15 hrs to rockford IL from where I live, thats where I usually go on my treks to IL). I think my only "issues" i will have are getting through the mtns of W. Pa and getting throught chicago...hate driving through chicago
     
  4. Apr 5, 2012 at 8:13 PM
    #4
    medic2230

    medic2230 Ditch Doctor

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    Columbus, Ga
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    Your going to have fun with that. I hauled my dive trailer which is a 6x10 enclosed to Florida. Holy hell that 4 banger was eating the gas. I had to down shift a lot. It pulled it and stopped it, no problem. You don't have to worry about being in a hurry. The truck will slow you down. That is part of the reason I bought the V6 this time.
     
  5. Apr 5, 2012 at 8:22 PM
    #5
    joes06tacoma

    joes06tacoma Well-Known Member

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    My buddy pulled his 19 foot Bayliner (3000 lbs or so?) from CA to NC when he moved. He was driving an Xterra with 3.3 V6 (170HP, 200 ftlbs). He said it got 10mpg the whole trip and pulled fine. He also had two kids, kid accessories, wife in the Xterra, and the boat was full of random crap that didn't fit in the moving truck. I think his experience is similar in regard to weight. He did this in the winter, so no opportunity for cooling issues, etc. The Taco is rated for 3500lbs, so should be okay. Keep in mind towing capacity includes the stuff you have in the truck as cargo also.
     
  6. Apr 5, 2012 at 8:36 PM
    #6
    rydaniels

    rydaniels [OP] Well-Known Member

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    South Jersey
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    4x4 4cyl manual
    bone stock except tool box in bed
    again all thanks for the input. I am more than confident I will be fairly below the limits of the truck so no worries there. I was dinking around and found a thread where I guy towed a similar trailer but with a pre-runner quad cab 4cyl..He stated he got 15ish towing, which is right around where I am expecting to be. I am going to do an oil change before I head out get things squared away. Thinking of doing the switch from conventional oil to synth or synth blend
     
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